Terminated from office job two years ago, trouble getting iunterviews :(

  1. Terminated for performance at previous job. How can I still get interviews?

    Two years ago I was terminated from an office job. I'm in my last term of nursing school and applying at various hospitals; undoubtedly I have to mark "yes" I was terminated from my last job and I think it is preventing me from getting considered. It seems almost every article addresses explaining termination in an interview and with the angle of explaining a "down-sizing" or something like that. In my case, I was Terminated because I failed to meet the requirements of a two-month performance improvement plan (this is what I put where I have to explain). I wonder if I am giving too much info? How can I spin this so that I can at least get considered for an interview? Is there no way to convey the changes I have made to improve since then (in the application phase)? I think I can present myself well in an interview, but the application keeps locking me out...

    Thank you!
    LS
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  2. 7 Comments

  3. by   /username
    You're not giving two much info, you're giving the wrong kind of information. Something along the lines of "It wasn't a good fit, and I wanted to pursue other opportunities for growth." would be sufficient. Have you had a job in the last two years?
  4. by   chare
    Quote from /username
    You're not giving two much info, you're giving the wrong kind of information. Something along the lines of "It wasn't a good fit, and I wanted to pursue other opportunities for growth." would be sufficient. Have you had a job in the last two years?
    And if a potential emoyer contacts the previous employer, what then? While many believe that all a previous employer can provide are dates of employment and eligibility for rehire, that is not the case.

    Many seem to believe that stating that "it wasn't a good fit" is going to automatically make everything better. Most interviewers, when they hear this, are going to probe further.

    It can be a good start, however, if the applicant has done a realistic self evaluation and can further discuss why it wasn't a good fit, what he or she learned from the experience, and what the have done to improve.
  5. by   /username
    I've had many jobs, both inside of healthcare and out, and I have never, ever, ever, ever, ever, ever had a prospective employer contact prior employers until after the interview, there's simply no time to contact previous employers for every applicant. Additionally, there is no law saying they have to only say dates of employment and rehire eligibility, however, most places avoid going into more detail to save them the liability. Saying it's a good fit gets you into the interview, where you can show how awesome you are and describe how even though it was decided that it would be best to end your previous job, this is what you learned and how you grew.
  6. by   lorenzo895
    Thank you both for the feedback. The only job I have had since then was at KFC in the few months leading up to starting school... I needed something during that transition time. I guess what I'm really concerned about is what to put in the application when having to explain a termination for performance reasons
  7. by   ProperlySeasoned
    As a hiring manager, I would look at what kind of job it was. If the job was in healthcare, the termination/lack of fit could be an issue. However, if you were fired from a telemarketing office job because you were terrible at cold calls selling time shares....I really don't care.
  8. by   TXRNgirl
    I agree with some others that you may be giving the wrong kind of information. I am an HR Director (and an RN) so I screen lots of applicants for various jobs. I have heard people say they had been terminated from a position for performance by saying, "I was not growing in the position and the termination was an eye-opener for me. It confirmed what I knew to be true - that I needed to be in another field." This would be a great segue for explaining what led you to embrace nursing.
    Another option may be to not even list it. If you were attending school at the time and this was only a 2 month stint, why mention it to perspective employers?
  9. by   lorenzo895
    Thank you both so much for your input. I really appreciate the experienced perspective on it. I'm gonna keep trying! Hopefully one of these will come through for me

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