still wanting to be a nurse after failing twice in an RN program - page 3

by Purple Princess 4,735 Views | 24 Comments

hi, I'm in my third year of classes at a local community college. I have wanted to work in the medical field for as long as I can remember. Our college has an RN program so I worked to meet all the requirements to get in and was... Read More


  1. 0
    Quote from Purple Princess
    hi, I'm in my third year of classes at a local community college. I have wanted to work in the medical field for as long as I can remember. Our college has an RN program so I worked to meet all the requirements to get in and was accepted. I struggled in fundamentals and was on remediation about every time I turned around. By the grace of God, I made it through. I began medical surgical nursing this semester but just crumbled. I was so nervous, the teacher again had me on remediation. I was getting very upset and stressed out, depressed because I knew it was over and ultimately it was. I'm still taking other classes and plan to graduate with a general studies degree in December of this year. I'm just bored and frustrated now. I feel like I tried so hard but just blew it. I was prepared for clinical, did my paperwork, knew my meds, and was doing ok in the class. I felt very intimidated by the instructor and became anxious when she asked questions that I just didn't know the answers to. I was not even enjoying what
    I was doing because of being tortured like that. And the staff didn't help either. I couldn't even talk to another student without the teacher having her sonar ears pointed in my direction! Nonetheless I am in a career planning class to explore other options. I have applied to an LPN school. The counselor at school doesn't think it's worth it because I'll probably not make it and they don't make alot of money. I'm working with OVR to set up funding to go and counseling. I just don't know what to do. Plus the school counselor wants me to get this general study degree but ridiculed my choices for courses. History and religion since they don't relate to nursing. I am getting my CNA license to get more experience in the healthcare setting. Does anyone have any ideas?
    I agree with most everyone else, go for LPN and see where it takes you. Try another school maybe they have better counselors that will encourage you instead of discouraging you.
  2. 0
    Quote from Purple Princess
    hi, I'm in my third year of classes at a local community college. I have wanted to work in the medical field for as long as I can remember. Our college has an RN program so I worked to meet all the requirements to get in and was accepted. I struggled in fundamentals and was on remediation about every time I turned around. By the grace of God, I made it through. I began medical surgical nursing this semester but just crumbled. I was so nervous, the teacher again had me on remediation. I was getting very upset and stressed out, depressed because I knew it was over and ultimately it was. I'm still taking other classes and plan to graduate with a general studies degree in December of this year. I'm just bored and frustrated now. I feel like I tried so hard but just blew it. I was prepared for clinical, did my paperwork, knew my meds, and was doing ok in the class. I felt very intimidated by the instructor and became anxious when she asked questions that I just didn't know the answers to. I was not even enjoying what
    I was doing because of being tortured like that. And the staff didn't help either. I couldn't even talk to another student without the teacher having her sonar ears pointed in my direction! Nonetheless I am in a career planning class to explore other options. I have applied to an LPN school. The counselor at school doesn't think it's worth it because I'll probably not make it and they don't make alot of money. I'm working with OVR to set up funding to go and counseling. I just don't know what to do. Plus the school counselor wants me to get this general study degree but ridiculed my choices for courses. History and religion since they don't relate to nursing. I am getting my CNA license to get more experience in the healthcare setting. Does anyone have any ideas?
    Hey girl. my name is sara and im not exactly having the same problem as you but its kinda the same. please dont give up. im doing my pre-reqs for a nursing program(RN) right now and terrified about not getting in.

    i may go for the LPN route. im going to apply for both LPN and RN. i am not going into the field for money. so LPN to RN, isnt bad. if you care for people, no matter what you do will make you feel good. my Aunt was an LPN first. she is currently a nurse practitioner. that took a lot of work. she said the best thing she EVER did was get experience as an LPN before RN school. basically just get your foot in the door.

    i am currently, "getting my foot in the door" im working at a hospital as a nurse technician, they trained me for it for free. just being in the setting seems to help. its in a way encouraging. to me hands on learning is the best!

    GOOD LUCK!

    if you wanna chat you can email me. srhdaw@yahoo.com
  3. 0
    No my dear you are completely wrong when you say that the RN program only consists of 9 months of nsg courses while the LVN program has 12. It doesn't make sense. The California ADN program is 2 years in length AFTER finishing prerequisites (anatomy, physiology, microbiology, biology, chemistry, etc all 1 semester in length per subject). So taking that into account, it might take people up to 2 years for their prereqs plus 2 years of the RN program. The RN students take 2 years of strictly nursing courses and LVNs take 1 year of nursing courses. The following speaks for it self.

    Here's the curriculum for both:
    ***Registered Nursing course sequence for students enrolling as of Fall 2002:
    Prerequisites:
    Micro 2
    Eligibility for English 1A
    Valid AHA CPR/Basic Life Support Card, Course, for health care provider.
    Nutri 125 or</B> Nutri 11
    Psych 24
    Required Non-nursing Courses:
    English 1A
    Speech 1
    Humanities
    Physo 2A or</B> Anatomy 25
    Physo 2B or</B> Physo 1
    Political Science and U.S. History or</B> American Institutions 125
    Critical Thinking (See Associate in Science Degree requirements, page 57)
    It is recommended that the student complete as many of these non-nursing classes as possible prior to beginning the program.
    Registered Nursing Curriculum
    Requirements for the Certificate of Achievement:

    </B></B>Registered Nursing course sequence for students enrolling as of Fall 2002:

    Sequence to be followed:

    </B>Semester I

    Semester II Semester III Semester IV (4 semesters or 2 yrs) Nurs 50

    Nurs 51 Nurs 52 Nurs 53 Nurs 50L

    Nurs 51L Nurs 52L Nurs 53L Nurs 137

    Physo 2B Nurs 138

    or</B> Physo 1
    Physo 2A

    or </B>Anat 25

    Recommended electives:

    </B>Nurs 136, 200, 202, 211, 215

    Anat 110

    MA 109, 115

    ***Vocational Nursing Curriculum

    Requirements for the Certificate of Achievement:

    </B>Sequence must be followed:
    Prerequisites:
    Nurs 137*

    Nurs 103 or a valid CNA Certificate

    Nutri 11 or 125*

    Psych 102*

    Valid AHA CPR/Basic Life Support Card, Course-C

    *It is recommended that students take these courses and Physo 100 during the year prior to enrollment in the program. Completion of these courses will also enhance likelihood of acceptance to the program.

    (Following sequence effective Fall 2003.)

    Semester I

    Winter Intersession Semester II Summer Session II (takes 1 yr) Nurs 108A

    Nurs 108B Nurs 123B Nurs 127 Nurs 123A

    Nurs 126 Nurs 127L Nurs 125

    Nurs 126L Nurs 125L

    **OOPS didnt see your following post. can't delete. but anyhow, i dont think anyone said that LVN's aren't bright, did they? my cousin is an LVN and doing quite well thank you. she is now in the process of completing her prereqs for the rn program. good luck to the first poster!! just keep at it.




    Quote from Dixiedi
    Is it the instrictors not providing the info needed or you not receiving the info they are providing.
    You must be able to answer that question to yourself truthfully before deciding what to do next.
    If they are provinding instruction and you are not "getting it" LPN school will not likely be the place for you. LPN school is not easier than RN school.

    LPN school does not include the more specific details involved in each topic (subject.)

    Too many people think LPN school is a year spent learning how to empty a bedpan. It is not. I admit, I went to school in the mid 70s and all of our graduates (for many years running) passed boards in the 95th and above percentile so I am a bit biased. I do know several nurses who went to public school type LPN programs about the same time I went to school and they barely passed the boards.

    Now, everybody think about this a minute or two. ADN programs consist of two 9 month school years. About 1/2 of of the courses taken are liberal arts/humanities/sciences. That means the ADN prepared nurse has had 9 months of nursing courses while the LPN has 12 months. BSN programs are simular in liberal arts/etc. to nursing courses. I agree liberal arts/humanities/sciences DO help you understand nursing classes more completely but are not required to understand the nursing courses for all of us.

    As I said before, if it's the instructors not presenting the info, just change schools, not your objective. If you are not "getting" the info presented, LPN school would not likely be the answer to your problem.
    Last edit by UCLARN on Jul 21, '04
  4. 0
    Hi,

    Although I am from the UK, the advice I will give you still applies and is very simple. If you truly still want to be an RN, then don't give up.

    I was in a similar situation about 9 years ago when I was doing my training, I failed my exams twice, but I didn't give up, as all I have ever wanted to do is be a RN. Having been qualified for 8 years now, I am so glad I didn't give up. Pursue your dreams and have faith and confidence in yourself, you'll make it in the end.
  5. 0
    Quote from Purple Princess
    hi, I'm in my third year of classes at a local community college. I have wanted to work in the medical field for as long as I can remember. Our college has an RN program so I worked to meet all the requirements to get in and was accepted. I struggled in fundamentals and was on remediation about every time I turned around. By the grace of God, I made it through. I began medical surgical nursing this semester but just crumbled. I was so nervous, the teacher again had me on remediation. I was getting very upset and stressed out, depressed because I knew it was over and ultimately it was. I'm still taking other classes and plan to graduate with a general studies degree in December of this year. I'm just bored and frustrated now. I feel like I tried so hard but just blew it. I was prepared for clinical, did my paperwork, knew my meds, and was doing ok in the class. I felt very intimidated by the instructor and became anxious when she asked questions that I just didn't know the answers to. I was not even enjoying what
    I was doing because of being tortured like that. And the staff didn't help either. I couldn't even talk to another student without the teacher having her sonar ears pointed in my direction! Nonetheless I am in a career planning class to explore other options. I have applied to an LPN school. The counselor at school doesn't think it's worth it because I'll probably not make it and they don't make alot of money. I'm working with OVR to set up funding to go and counseling. I just don't know what to do. Plus the school counselor wants me to get this general study degree but ridiculed my choices for courses. History and religion since they don't relate to nursing. I am getting my CNA license to get more experience in the healthcare setting. Does anyone have any ideas?

    Hi there.
    Hugs first.

    Sounds as if you have a bad case of social anxiety. I have that too and take medicine for it. Go to a counselor ..someone with a master's in social work specializing in conseling can help you sort out things.




    Just don't give up and don't let anyone take your dream to be a nurse, a doctor whatever, away from you.


    You can do anything.


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