Seeking ASN a "chase after wind"?

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    I am a 46 year old single male, and in the middle of a major shift of life-focus.
    After 22.5 years in a Catholic monastery, I felt the need to move on. I surely have had much experience with empathizing with others in my contacts over the years. Also, my last job--albeit short-term--was as a nurse's aide in a nursing home. That was in the summer of 1989.

    During my years of prayer in the monastery, I would often come back to the nursing/hospital scene in my heart. So upon leaving, it was almost 'natural' for me to incline toward the medical/caring scene for my 'new life.' I have certainly been 'acclaimed' for my 'compassion skills'.

    But my main concern is that, as a 46 year old--and not a 26 year old--who has to restart his life, is there really a job prospect for such as me? I have heard dire things about ASN graduates not getting jobs anywhere...........unemployed nurses all over the place.......the myth of the shortage of nurses............At my age, I really don't have time to spend a bunch of money on an education that will get me nowhere!

    I could relocate, if that helps...............any thoughts?
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  3. 5 Comments so far...

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    I should add that I received a BS in Botany from UMass-Amherst in 1988
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    I would encourage you to first see if you can shadow a nurse on a hospital shift. You may find that what nursing is today will not satisfy your desire to show compassion. Sure, nurses have compassion, but we are also mostly overworked and I would imagine most, if not all, of us would say that we just simply don't have enough hours in the day to get it all done, let alone give the care that we thought we were entering the profession to give. So many go into nursing not really understanding what it is, and end up disillusioned. Since this is a second career, be really sure of what you're getting into so all the hard work of school is not in vain.
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    Totally agree with Tammy above. I highly recommend shadowing/talking to nurses in various specialties and get the feel of what it is like to be a nurse in actual practice. This is just my opinion based on my limited experience, but I find that nurses in hospice and palliative care are some of the most amazing and compassionate nurses.

    As far as your concern about your age, I graduated with people who were in your age group and it might not be easy but getting a job isn't impossible. It just takes time and persistence. Also, having BSN rather than ADN gives you a better chance. Since you have a BS degree already, consider accelerated BSN or direct-entry MSN programs. Best of luck!
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    thanks for your input, folks!
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    [QUOTE=johndamien;6848281]I am a 46 year old single male, and in the middle of a major shift of life-focus.
    After 22.5 years in a Catholic monastery, I felt the need to move on. I surely have had much experience with empathizing with others in my contacts over the years. Also, my last job--albeit short-term--was as a nurse's aide in a nursing home. That was in the summer of 1989.



    I have been a nurse for 22 years and I'm not sure at this time that I'd recommend this profession to anyone. Administration is so worried about patient satisfaction that all they worry about is care boards and rounding sheets and fast, fast, fast documentation. All of healthcare is being driven by patient satisfaction and insurance companies to the point where disgruntled doctors are now having money deducted for not being totally compliant with administration/insurance demands. As a charge nurse I am being pushed to coach nurses to do better patient care even as they are already over -extended with their current work load. This builds resentment and poor morale from the nursing staff and ever increasing demand from administration who also insist that everyone clock out on time. Many nurses simply clock out and finish their work off the clock. I easily give administration an hour a day off the clock- just so I don't have to hear their BS. I do procedures by the book -conscientiously and with compassion and it takes time to do things the way you would want your loved ones treated. Administration wants patients in and out- throughput is what it is called. Case management now drives healthcare- not doctors. Case managers and insurance companies tell doctors when a patient should go home- many times against a doctor’s better judgment. Anyway I cannot think of another profession that requires so much emotionally, intellectually, and physically from a person as does nursing. I have often thought about this and cannot think of another profession that requires so much of a person.
    I do not recommend nursing at this time- especially for someone who is 46. If I had to do it over I would probably be an Advanced nurse practitioner, nuclear meds tech, MRI, or CT- all seem like a better choice in hindsight.
    BTW- I am a male nurse.


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