RN working in Dermatology or Plastic Surgery Office??

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    hello everyone, i was just wondering if someone can give me alittle insight of what its like working as an rn in a plastic surgery or dermatology office. i would really love to do this once i become an rn. i really dont see myself working in a hospital. i'am already an esthetician working in a medical spa and i love it, i just want to be able to do more. is there anyone who is already doing this that can give me all the info and far as a day in the life and pay wise?

    thank you so much!
    Minney and esthegirl23 like this.
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    I am also wondering the same thing- I am going to nursing school, and I am positive that my interest is plastic surgery. I looked into becoming a nurse esthetician, but after realizing that this is not really possible in Florida (as far as performing injectables), I am now interested in hearing from someone who works as an RN for a plastic surgeon or dermatologist. I have read that plastic surgeons want you to have prior experience in the OR. Is there anyone that does this that could tell about their job, how you got it, and salary (if you don't mind)? Thank you!
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    I believe you will have to decide whether it is surgical instruments you want to do or teaching patients.

    Last edit by tnbutterfly on Jul 15, '10 : Reason: DO NOT POST LINKS
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    I could have written the original post! There has to be some nurses who can offer insight...
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    I have worked in a privately owned plastic surgery office for several years, starting as a medical assistant, then RN, interim clinical coordinator, and now PRN as I'm in FNP school. It is an office setting with an outpatient ambulatory surgery center (2 full blown ORs and PACU).

    Our RNs work in the front office seeing patients, doing H&Ps, pre/post op care, wound care, assisting w/ local/minor procedures. We see cosmetic and insurance pts. Also work in the pre-op and PACU, and OR. We don't have any RN aesthicians per se (we actually have 2 non-nurse aestheticians that do skin care and some laser), but there are a couple of RNs trained in hair and vein lasers, and cosmetic and nipple tattooing (for breast ca reconstruction). The docs do the botox etc.

    For RNs with surgical experience, they can assist. Sometimes the docs will train to assist and suture if no experience, or they just "circulate", i.e. paperwork, runner for supplies, managing specimens etc.

    Its not a bad place to work. Most patients are healthy and happy (and choose) to be there~the cosmetic ones anyways Being privately owned, it's M-F, no nights, weekends, holidays or call. Most of the clinical staff work four 10 hour days. We do see alot of skin cancers, skin lesions, wounds (ulcers, burns, hand injuries), carpal tunnel etc.

    In Virginia, pay is generally lower for nurses than in other areas. Pay for this office is on the low end which has always been one of my 'issues'. All RNs at this practice start at the same pay regardless of experience. Starting pay is lower than the local hospitals by several $, but the benefits are pretty decent (surgery at cost after 2 years, great 401k match, decent insurance, STD/LTD, montly bonus based on cosmetic revenue, child/family friendly).

    Not sure how much this helps you as its based on my experience with just one office, but I did like it a lot. Not too stressful and able to work in different capacities as an RN, not the same type assignment day in day out.
    esthegirl23 and NeoNurseTX like this.
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    I am a licensed esthetician that just started school to become an RN. I would like to work in the field of plastic surgery and would love to hear from more RN's in the field.
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    I am also a NYS licensed esthetician who is looking into RN school. Anyone know if you get an kind of credits toward your degree at all from the esthetics courses? That would be great but i htink I may know the answer already...
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    I worked as a new grad RN at very prestigious hospital for about 6 months and absolutely hated my job. However, this horrible experience definitely led me into the aesthetic field where I found my true passion. After leaving the hospital, I searched on Craigslist for RN positions and found an open position at a national plastic surgery clinic. My manager absolutely loved my personality and felt my experience as well as "freshness" in my nursing career made me a perfect match for the clinic.

    As an RN at my clinic, my main responsibility is to educate patients during their pre op/post op appointments. I also ensure all charts are accurate and complete in preparation for formal audit. Furthermore, I must promote secondary stage garments to increase our sale volume. When we are low in staff, I help in the OR and assist the surgeon with prepping the patient, recording accurate documentation (I&Os, VS, observation of minimal sedation from patient), and discharging the patient.

    Although I'm getting paid $9 less than I did working in the hospital, I must say that I love my job. Working with people who are young and healthy is way more appealing to me than inpatient care. I'm currently looking into getting certified in Botox and dermal fillers to broaden my skill set and be more marketable.

    **If anyone has experience with injectables and independent contracting, I would be very interested in learning more from you
    Last edit by Cosmetic RN on Apr 26, '12 : Reason: Grammatical error
    Kathleenmae07 and Estefanyvg like this.
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    I know this post is very old, but I live in VA and am interested in this area of nursing- or at least learning more about it. I am graduating in May and need some advice on what it's like to work in this field and etc. If you would be able to help me out I would greatly appreciate it!! Thanks
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    I have been a nurse for 40 year. I have been working in dermatology for 8 year now, in Mohs surgery for 7 of those years. It is very complex and rewarding work. You must be able to multi-task and move fast. It is not a sit at your desk job, you are on your feet and running most of the day (I work 4-ten hour days). If you want an easy going job, this is not it. It is hard work but it is never boring. People often think dermatology equates cosmetic, but since the skin is the largest organ of the body, it is the first to give signs and symptoms of injury and literally multi-thousands illnesses. A rash is not just a rash, but may be the first sign of a deadly illness. Melanoma is the deadliest skin cancer and it is an honor to be part of ridding people of this cancer since the rise in young people is happening so frequently (please use sunscreen and do not use tanning beds). There is much to do in education and soothing people who have disorders that can scar them permanently. Dermatology is not for the faint of heart, but it is very rewarding. My previous experience was in the operating room with plastic surgery being a specialty. Also very hard work. Not everything is breast augmentation or tummy tucks, but often it is a tummy tuck secondary to using that skin and fat to reconstruct breasts after mastectomy, a surgery that will have you on your feet for 6-10 hours. But if you get to be part of that, you feel good for quite awhile! Hope this helps.


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