"Omitting" a job from resume

  1. 0
    Quote from HouTx
    Uh oh. Not a good idea to simply "omit" a job from your resume. When you get a new job, they will have to run a full background check (Federal requirement). This will turn up any job in which you received a paycheck (with FICA deductions), no matter how brief it was. If your application does not match your background check, this is considered falsification of your application and your job offer can just go "poof".
    Taken from HouTx's informative post here.

    I currently have a job as a nurse but I'd like to call it a dead end (P)RN job. Pay is sub par to my worth as a Licensed Registered Professional Nurse but they're the only one hiring new grad AAS in NY Metro.

    Ever since they let us know on day 1 that they won't give us a great recommendation but will actually make sure to make it bad unless we reach that 1 yr employment, they gotta suck that blood dry right. Hey I understand it is a business and so am I, I took the executive decision of "omitting" them in my resume until that yr mark! Yes I will continue my search as a new grad which is how I think will employers see it anyway?!

    Have you ever done it for x reasons? Is omitting a job from a resume a good or bad idea?
    Last edit by double_minority on Feb 27, '13

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  2. 12 Comments...

  3. 0
    The other issue I see is about a gap in your resume. Is this PRN job a 2nd job? If not, then you will have an unaccounted for period of time on your resume. What answer would you give to prospective employers who want to know what you did during that time?
  4. 1
    Well, it's your own choice to make, but, as HouTX noted, a lot of employers, if they asked for all employers and you omitted one, and they find out (and there is a good chance they will), will consider that dishonesty sufficient to send your application to the "circular file" (or fire you if you have already been employed).

    Maybe you ought to do the right thing and keep the current job for a (minimum) year before jumping ship. You can never go wrong "taking the high road" and doing the right thing in nursing, and you never know when something from your past is going to come back and bite you. Nursing is a much smaller "club" than most new grads realize, and information gets around. You have nothing to gain by burning bridges with your current employer.
    psu_213 likes this.
  5. 0
    Quote from double_minority

    Taken from HouTx's informative post here.

    I currently have a job as a nurse but I'd like to call it a dead end (P)RN job. Pay is sub par to my worth as a Licensed Registered Professional Nurse but they're the only one hiring new grad AAS in NY Metro.

    Ever since they let us know on day 1 that they won't give us a great recommendation but will actually make sure to make it bad unless we reach that 1 yr employment, they gotta suck that blood dry right. Hey I understand it is a business and so am I, I took the executive decision of "omitting" them in my resume until that yr mark! Yes I will continue my search as a new grad which is how I think will employers see it anyway?!

    Have you ever done it for x reasons? Is omitting a job from a resume a good or bad idea?
    Pretty sure i work for this same agency.
  6. 0
    It is my first and only job. Having a low salary in NY is no joke

    Quote from psu_213
    The other issue I see is about a gap in your resume. Is this PRN job a 2nd job? If not, then you will have an unaccounted for period of time on your resume. What answer would you give to prospective employers who want to know what you did during that time?
    Lol, and when it comes to what you just said, and I thank you for your input, I would tell them that I have been looking for a JOB! Nothing different than the other gaps in my resume.

    Employers know what time it is, they're the one not employing.
  7. 0
    Quote from elkpark
    Well, it's your own choice to make, but, as HouTX noted, a lot of employers, if they asked for all employers and you omitted one, and they find out (and there is a good chance they will), will consider that dishonesty sufficient to send your application to the "circular file" (or fire you if you have already been employed).

    Maybe you ought to do the right thing and keep the current job for a (minimum) year before jumping ship. You can never go wrong "taking the high road" and doing the right thing in nursing, and you never know when something from your past is going to come back and bite you. Nursing is a much smaller "club" than most new grads realize, and information gets around. You have nothing to gain by burning bridges with your current employer.
    Thank you so much for those very wise words elkpark. I understand it is my decision but I'll appreciate all guidings. I can learn, everyday.
  8. 0
    Quote from double_minority
    It is my first and only job. Having a low salary in NY is no joke



    Lol, and when it comes to what you just said, and I thank you for your input, I would tell them that I have been looking for a JOB! Nothing different than the other gaps in my resume.

    Employers know what time it is, they're the one not employing.
    I see your point, but I'm not sure that I would feel comfortable flat out lying to a prospective employer that asks me if I had any job during a given time frame.
  9. 0
    Quote from psu_213

    I see your point, but I'm not sure that I would feel comfortable flat out lying to a prospective employer that asks me if I had any job during a given time frame.
    Thank you for your input
  10. 0
    Can't you keep looking for a job while keeping the current position on your resume? In an interview, it would be wiser to say, "Xyz wasn't a good fit for me. I decided to move on..." Rather than omitting them from your resume altogether.
  11. 0
    Quote from joanna73
    Can't you keep looking for a job while keeping the current position on your resume? In an interview, it would be wiser to say, "Xyz wasn't a good fit for me. I decided to move on..." Rather than omitting them from your resume altogether.
    I hear all of your advices and learn too. Come up with a tangible and honest excuse as of why I am applying out of a job so soon. I am slowly furthering away from the ommission.

    To answer your question NO :-( I cannot stop looking for another job as in some weeks I am only pulling a $100 a week......


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