Nurse Educator without nursing experience.. (?) - page 3

by bsnwnab

7,819 Views | 41 Comments

If I finished my BSN, and went straight to doing an MSN Educator program without any clinical/work experience, once I finish my MSN Ed, would I ever be hired as a teacher in community colleges or other places that hire MSN Ed... Read More


  1. 1
    Quote from RN In FL
    This is exactly what bugs me about MANY not all career change people, people that get that BSN, go thru accelerated programs, hop on over to MSN programs, with no intentions of "nursing", and wonder why they can't get jobs in what their intentions are in the first place. I am in no way saying this poster has done this, just sounds "suspect". If people dont want to be nurses, stay out of the profession. I may sound harsh, but I am keeping it real. Can you imagine an MSN with no clinical. Thats why many of our young nurses are being turned out the way they are today upon graduating, because of very weak clinical instructors, already.

    signed,

    Old skool RN
    Your young nurses?

    I graduated with an older, second-career lady who was adamant on going straight from BSN to MSN in order to pursue a career either in education or management. Her excuse was that she was older, had already "had one career" and "didn't have the time" to put in the obligatory bedside hours. Her first career had been in accounting, so it's not even like she could claim some ambiguous "experience."
    RN In FL likes this.
  2. 1
    I'm sorry to say it, too, but without experience - hands-on experience - you will not be respected by your students. When I was in school, an assistant nursing director joined us in clinical one day and it was MOST obvious she did not even know how to make a patient's bed - and the patient was not in the bed! While I liked this person for herself, I didn't think too much of her "on the job." PLEASE get some, no make it LOTS, of clinical experience before even attempting to teach others. And don't be fooled by the popular notion of "see one, do one, teach one." Some of us are repetitive learners; the more we can do a procedure with appropriate and helpful supervision, the better it's learned and retained.

    Good luck in your quest.
    loriangel14 likes this.
  3. 5
    Oh, my! I think you have a faulty idea of what nursing instructors do. We teach the realities of nursing. You can't possible know the realities if you haven't experienced them. You haven't experienced the realities in the process of getting a BSN. It's soooo much different when you're "out there" working as a nurse.

    Even with experience, you will probably feel incompetent as a first time instructor, for awahile, just as you very probably would feel incompetent as a first year nurse. That's the norm! Imagine putting both of those incompetent feelings together, and how stressed you'd feel!

    Some schools would hire you, but they would be the schools that can't find someone with experience to teach what they need. That leaves you with extreme stress and an inability to teach what the students need to know.

    Please don't consider this as an option. It would be a dis-service to you and especially to your students.
    loriangel14, wooh, not.done.yet, and 2 others like this.
  4. 5
    I assume that the OP is focusing efforts on a position in academia - & find the PP comments very interesting. I also agree with those who are dismayed (at the very least) at the thought of an instructor without any clinical experience. I'm also very saddened at the hypocrisy - - how could you possibly inspire and motivate student nurses when you have such distaste for the work of nursing? There is no way that the negative attitude could be hidden from students - many of whom look to their instructors as role models.

    I want to put in a word for those of us who are workplace-based educators. There is NO WAY to move into our positions without clinical expertise... not just experience - "expertise". We have to achieve and maintain competency not only in clinical skills but also in operational areas such as quality, risk, HR, etc. in order to do our jobs. Entry level - at least in my organization - is an MSN. Essentially, there really isn't a 'fast track' or accelerated method to become a workplace-based nurse educator ..... thank goodness.
    wooh, loriangel14, Altra, and 2 others like this.
  5. 0
    Quote from dirtyhippiegirl
    Your young nurses?

    I graduated with an older, second-career lady who was adamant on going straight from BSN to MSN in order to pursue a career either in education or management. Her excuse was that she was older, had already "had one career" and "didn't have the time" to put in the obligatory bedside hours. Her first career had been in accounting, so it's not even like she could claim some ambiguous "experience."
    ...those kind too!!! ESPECIALLY. sorry to only make reference to the "young"....my bad!
  6. 2
    I have been a floor nurse now for three months, independent for one of those. I am just now starting to touch the tip of the iceberg in realizing how much I did NOT learn in nursing school. Every shift I have at least three to four deer-in-headlights moments in which I seek out more experienced nurses to guide me. I had incredibly experienced instructors who loved their time at the bedside and some of whom still do stints in PRN bedside/patient care positions during the summer or on their off hours. I tend to believe the best teachers are those who are teaching what they love. You can't love an ideal without teaching an ideal and you can't teach a reality if an ideal is your only experience. I cannot think of another career in which teaching from a place of ideals would hold a greater disservice than nursing. You'd be programming graduates to be disillusioned and ultimately to fail. The students get to bring the ideals to the table. The instructors get to hone those ideals into a baby nurse at least somewhat prepared for the moment the honeymoon is over.
    loriangel14 and wooh like this.
  7. 4
    OP, if what you are after is an academic career, why not pursue a degree in a "pure" science such as biology or chemistry and teach that?

    Any *applied* science, such as nursing, inherently requires an understanding of the application ... something you cannot grasp without having worked in the field.
    loriangel14, NutmeggeRN, RN In FL, and 1 other like this.
  8. 1
    Experience is a must-- not fair to students even if you are very BOOK smart----knowing how and actually doing are not always the same so to be fair to yourself and your students-- try to get in some clinical experience as you work towards your Masters.
    loriangel14 likes this.
  9. 0
    This seems like something an advisor should've talked about when you decided to enter the program. I can't imagine it would be easy to teach without experience and I can't imagine I'd be thrilled to find out I had a nursing instructor who'd never actually been in the field. But I'm sure it's possible.
    I honestly can't believe there are schools that don't require ANY experience. I know of some masters programs that may not require it when you apply, but you have to work for at least a year during the program.
    Would it be possible to get a part-time job while you're in school?
  10. 1
    All these schools nowadays care about are 4.8 gpa's and 100% on TEA's test. ANY of them....from BSN programs to MSN programs
    Stephalump likes this.


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