No I wouldn't recommend nursing - page 8

It surprises me how many students are going into nursing. I had my BSN since 1992 and have worked in the hospitals since then. Nursing is back-breaking labor with the reoccurring role of cleaning... Read More

  1. by   nursechick30
    Quote from Yana
    Jeez! That doesn't sound too good for a student!
    Pardon my stupid question, but do RN's have to clean poop everywhere or it depends on the department you work in?
    Well, I do know from where I work, we don't use aides. We have EMT's who do our prn work. Some of them are good to help, some (if not most) are not. So, it falls to us, the nurses, to do most of the "dirty work". Not all hospitals are lucky enough to have nurse's aides to do bedside care.
  2. by   nursechick30
    I really don't know that I would recommend nursing to anyone. I see EMT's and secretaries pursuing a career in nursing. Now, knowing what they see us do every day, and what we put up with, they still want to do it. I wouldn't presume to tell anyone what I think is best for them. But, speaking for myself, I know that if I knew then what I know now, I would never have entered nursing. Things have changed so much in the 10 years I've worked as one. Things have progressed from caring for the patient to caring for the patient and the family. Since when did it become like going on a vacation? I see really sick patients nearly every day I work and they are the ones you rarely hear a complaint out of. Yet, we get these chronic chest-painers who come in looking for their next fix or attention, or whatever, and milk it for all it's worth. We are no longer required to just provide care for the patients. We also have to take care of the families. Sure, it's okay to provide something to drink or give them a leftover tray or a couple of blankets but when they start treating me like a servant in a 5-star motel, that's when I get more than just a little upset. I'm sorry, but I'm there to take care of patients, not every person who walks through the door to visit.:angryfire When I first started in nursing, I was young and gullible. Over the years I guess I've become a bit calloused. I don't like that, but there it is. Everyone's heard of the classic case of nursing "burnout" and I've got a major case of it. If there was some way to change that, I would. But, as I said, if I knew then what I know now, I would have picked something else. It's not worth the criticism and what we have to put up with. I envy anyone lucky enough to like it and keep liking it.:angel2:
  3. by   Sheri257
    Quote from nursechick30
    Things have progressed from caring for the patient to caring for the patient and the family. Since when did it become like going on a vacation? I see really sick patients nearly every day I work and they are the ones you rarely hear a complaint out of. Yet, we get these chronic chest-painers who come in looking for their next fix or attention, or whatever, and milk it for all it's worth. We are no longer required to just provide care for the patients. We also have to take care of the families. Sure, it's okay to provide something to drink or give them a leftover tray or a couple of blankets but when they start treating me like a servant in a 5-star motel, that's when I get more than just a little upset.
    This is definitely one of the most difficult parts of the job. And when people say things like this ...

    Quote from FutureNurse35
    If you love helping others, there should be no reason to complain.
    I really resent it. It's a hellava lot more complicated than that.

    One of the biggest problems you have is these patients with relatively minor conditions who are fully ambulatory, yet they constantly complain and demand constant attention, expecting you to wait on them hand and foot when you have other patients who are much worse off and who really need your help, but the demanding patient and their family takes all your time away from them.

    You try to help the other patients who really need it ... but the demanding patients start complaining to the nurses' station, to management, to the doctors and anybody else they can find if you're not waiting on them every single minute so ... even if a poor little old lady who can't walk is crying out for help and in pain ... you end up having to ignore her most of the time because the fully ambulatory, self care patient is insisting that you wipe their butt, wash their hair and deliver a special tray of food.

    Now I ask you ... does this mean I don't love helping others ... Or does it mean I feel terrible when that poor little old lady did not get my full attention because the demanding patient who really does not need my help expects the hospital to be a five star hotel? And management forces me to set the wrong priorities because they don't want to deal with the constant demands and complaints?

    No ... I don't think so.

    Last edit by Sheri257 on Jan 2, '06
  4. by   Jessy_RN
    Wow, Lizz

    I am not a nurse, but after reading your post I can see myself in your shoes. What a hard thing to do. How difficult it is to please everyone and split yourself in so many ways.

    Lets pray for the better and for some kind of middle ground to be reached. A good start would be making it clear to the family members to understand they are not there to be catered too. (it should be obvious and no need to do this) but in these days you never can bee too clear.

    Best wishes to you and keep doing the great work you do.
  5. by   Sheri257
    Quote from Future_RN_Jess
    A good start would be making it clear to the family members to understand they are not there to be catered too. (it should be obvious and no need to do this) but in these days you never can bee too clear.
    You can be "clear" all you want with some of these people, but it won't make any difference with a lot of them.

    They will continue to complain to everybody they can find and, even make up outright lies just to get attention. It's very frustrating because it ends up eating up all your time. They have nothing to do all day but think of things for you to do when, you've got a thousand other things to do and other patients to worry about but, they don't want to hear that because they don't care.

    Last edit by Sheri257 on Jan 2, '06
  6. by   nursechick30
    Quote from lizz
    This is definitely one of the most difficult parts of the job. And when people say things like this ...

    I really resent it. It's a hellava lot more complicated than that.

    One of the biggest problems you have is these patients with relatively minor conditions who are fully ambulatory, yet they constantly complain and demand constant attention, expecting you to wait on them hand and foot when you have other patients who are much worse off and who really need your help, but the demanding patient and their family takes all your time away from them.

    You try to help the other patients who really need it ... but the demanding patients start complaining to the nurses' station, to management, to the doctors and anybody else they can find if you're not waiting on them every single minute so ... even if a poor little old lady who can't walk is crying out for help and in pain ... you end up having to ignore her most of the time because the fully ambulatory, self care patient is insisting that you wipe their butt, wash their hair and deliver a special tray of food.

    Now I ask you ... does this mean I don't love helping others ... Or does it mean I feel terrible when that poor little old lady did not get my full attention because the demanding patient who really does not need my help expects the hospital to be a five star hotel? And management forces me to set the wrong priorities because they don't want to deal with the constant demands and complaints?

    No ... I don't think so.


    I see what you're saying, but just because that's how I see things, that doesn't mean I don't like feeling I've done a good job. I do like to help those who honestly need help. It's just that we get these patients in who do take our time when they are not the priority at that time. We are even expected to treat them that way and somehow do it for everyone and get everything done by the end of shift. I'm tired of management who don't care. They just want what looks good on paper. And if our patient satisfaction scores drop, we're the ones who get reamed for it, even if it isn't our responsibility.....like the temperature of a food tray and how the food tastes, etc., etc. The list just goes on and on and on. Things we have no control over, but yet somehow, they make it out to be the nurses' responsibility. These types of things are actually on our surveys and you wouldn't believe the complaints we get. We bust our asses trying to save lives and give the best care we can and yet we're expected to worry over something as stupid as the temperature of a food tray. Now, I'm not saying I wouldn't go and order another one or heat it up, but that's just one more responsibility added, one more thing to worry about, and one more thing to get a complaint from that we get griped at about. No one out there on this forum knows me but I don't act this way at work. I'm just on here to vent a little and let those who are not in nursing to see what it's like and what we have to put up with. I don't know how other hospitals are but I'm telling you what mine is like. And quite frankly, I'm tired of it. I'm tired of not being appreciated. Things are different now than they were 10 years ago when I started. A lot more responsibilities have been added to us that would have been laughed at 10 years ago. So, that's all I'm going to say about it for now.
    Last edit by nursechick30 on Jan 3, '06
  7. by   Sheri257
    Quote from nursechick30
    I see what you're saying, but just because that's how I see things, that doesn't mean I don't like feeling I've done a good job. I do like to help those who honestly need help. It's just that we get these patients in who do take our time when they are not the priority at that time. We are even expected to treat them that way and somehow do it for everyone and get everything done by the end of shift. I'm tired of management who don't care. They just want what looks good on paper. And if our patient satisfaction scores drop, we're the ones who get reamed for it, even if it isn't our responsibility.....like the temperature of a food tray and how the food tastes, etc., etc. The list just goes on and on and on. Things we have no control over, but yet somehow, they make it out to be the nurses' responsibility. These types of things are actually on our surveys and you wouldn't believe the complaints we get. We bust our asses trying to save lives and give the best care we can and yet we're expected to worry over something as stupid as the temperature of a food tray. Now, I'm not saying I wouldn't go and order another one or heat it up, but that's just one more responsibility added, one more thing to worry about, and one more thing to get a complaint from that we get griped at about. No one out there on this forum knows me but I don't act this way at work. I'm just on here to vent a little and let those who are not in nursing to see what it's like and what we have to put up with. I don't know how other hospitals are but I'm telling you what mine is like. And quite frankly, I'm tired of it. I'm tired of not being appreciated. Things are different now than they were 10 years ago when I started. A lot more responsibilities have been added to us that would have been laughed at 10 years ago. So, that's all I'm going to say about it for now.
    I think you might have thought I was criticizing you when, in fact, I was agreeing with you. I actually was responding to someone else's post.

    Last edit by Sheri257 on Jan 3, '06
  8. by   journeeyh
    Hello All,

    I am very stressed out right now. I am going back to complete my final stretch of becoming an LPN. Classes start again on 1/23 and I am seriously considering not going back. My dilema is this, I have been told that there are not a lot of jobs for LPNs out there. Also I hear they are only making around $8-$10 per hour. I can not survive on that I work in customer service and make a lot more than that. I am also looking to go to medical school and I pay my own tuition. 8-10 dollars per hour will put an end to that. I have also looked online and I can not seem to find any jobs for LPNS. I only see positions for RN's. Can this be true, or am I not looking in the right places? Please Help!!!!!!!!
  9. by   RS0302
    Quote from journeeyh
    Hello All,

    I am very stressed out right now. I am going back to complete my final stretch of becoming an LPN. Classes start again on 1/23 and I am seriously considering not going back. My dilema is this, I have been told that there are not a lot of jobs for LPNs out there. Also I hear they are only making around $8-$10 per hour. I can not survive on that I work in customer service and make a lot more than that. I am also looking to go to medical school and I pay my own tuition. 8-10 dollars per hour will put an end to that. I have also looked online and I can not seem to find any jobs for LPNS. I only see positions for RN's. Can this be true, or am I not looking in the right places? Please Help!!!!!!!!

    8-10 dollars seems kinda low. But, I am not from New York state. Where are you looking for jobs? Are you looking at hospitals? Have you looked into employment at nursing homes?
  10. by   crowdreamer
    Hi all. I am currently an attorney, wanting to switch careers to become a certified nurse-midwife. I haven't had time to read ALL the responses yet, but just wanted to add my own 2 cents. I went to school for 4 years to get my B.S., then 3 more long years to get my J.D., all the while thinking I was going to make a difference in the world by becoming an environmental attorney. I have spent the past 6 years sitting in an office for sometimes 12 hours a day, bored out of my mind doing paperwork, or in the courtroom getting yelled at by some judge or other attorney, or being yelled at by supervisers. I went to work for the "big firm" making the "big bucks" (a total of $60,000 per year, whoopee), only to spend every minute of my time working with no life on the side, no vacation, little holiday time, and even working on weekends, all to put more money in the hands of greedy corporations. When I decided I didn't want to sell out anymore, I started my own practice, only to find that my clients are the worst bosses of all, and making less than $20,000 a year my first year. In order to make the big $$$ I would have to put in long hours and get no vacation time, not to mention no benefits. I don't know any happy attorneys. I have tried all areas of law, including family law (divorces and custody), personal injury, real estate, government work (very low pay), medical malpractice, the list goes on and on, and I have not found one area where I felt I was actually helping someone.

    Meanwhile, I have discovered that I have an absolute passion for babies being delivered. And my mom is friends with a nurse who has been practicing for 30-odd years, is paid $80,000 a year +, and works two days a week, in a hospital. So I am going for it.

    I think the bottom line is, if you have a passion for any career, you will gravitate towards it and find a way to make it work for you. Practicing law really does not fit my personality and I did it mainly on the advice of other people, so I do not enjoy it. But I can imagine that there are people out there who absolutely love going into the courtroom and arguing their case, even despite the long hours, and those same people will probably work their way up to partner and make big bucks too. Those same people probably think I am nuts to give up such a "wonderful" career, but I am going to do what I love and so are they.

    If you love being a nurse but hate the working conditions, why not go back to school and become a nurse-anesthetologist (sp?), or switch to clinical work? Surely there is someplace for all these trained yet unsatisfied professionals? If not, I agree with other opinions on here--change your career. No use ******** about it. Do something about it, it's never too late.
  11. by   greystoke
    I'm not a sexist but let's face it. If men outnumbered women in the field I would venture to say that there would be fewer slams from administration. Men would tend to stand more firm on issues and support their staff and put up with less, shall we say, garbage brought on by administration. There would be a better chance of forming unions to support and protect the nursing field.
  12. by   Marie_LPN, RN
    Just once, i'd love the men vs. women crap to be left at the door.
  13. by   greystoke
    Quote from Marie_LPN
    Just once, i'd love the men vs. women crap to be left at t
    he door.
    As I expected there are always those who do not see the point...that's fine. But after 20yrs of nursing I have seen time after time when my female nurse manager has bowed down to upper administration without a fight only to tell me later that what they expected us to do was ridiculous. The few times I had male managers, with one exception, seemed less chaotic. Cold hard fact...I have never been fortunate enough to work in Dreamland.

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