No I wouldn't recommend nursing - page 16

It surprises me how many students are going into nursing. I had my BSN since 1992 and have worked in the hospitals since then. Nursing is back-breaking labor with the reoccurring role of cleaning... Read More

  1. by   icegambit
    I found this thread very helpful. I have been deciding whether I should go into nursing or pursue being a dentist for almost two years now. I graduated with a BA in another field of study last year. I have been taking some science classes since graduation. Last year, I applied to an accelerated BSN program. A couple of months later, I found out that I have been accepted and the program starts in September 2007. If I choose to do the program, I will graduate with a BSN a year later.

    What I have been so confused about is whether I should be a dentist instead. I would really like to become a dentist but the time and money I need to invest in this career seem to hold me back. I figured that I will rack up about $200k in student loans by the time I graduate dental school. Also, I still need to take a few science classes so I won't be able to apply until the 2008 cycle (for the class entering in 2009).

    I know I'm still young (23 yrs. old), but I just want to start a career. I have nothing right now, no job, and no family to help me out. I figured that if I decide to do the nursing program, I could start working as a nurse by next year and then go for an advance degree (crna, msn or etc.). People have been telling me that I should do nursing and forget about dentistry. Dental school is just not practical and I would be drowning in loans by the time I graduate. If I do nursing, I could soon buy a house and do things I wanted to do but could not afford to do. I know that I should not look at the money, but its hard not to look at that aspect when you have nothing else.

    I have been debating with myself since I got the acceptance letter to the acc. BSN program last year. Now, I have two weeks to decide and, once again, I am completely lost. I have been looking at this website and trying to decide if I could make it as a nurse or if I will just be miserable if I choose this route. I thought about becoming a nurse and if I truly do not like it, pursue dentistry later on. However, the BSN program will cost me about $35,000 plus living expenses. I don't want to take on that much debt and then go for dentistry later, which will add more debt.

    I just feel so lost and confused.
  2. by   WDWpixieRN
    Quote from icegambit
    I just feel so lost and confused.
    What do you see yourself LOVE doing? What will make you happy to get out of bed in the morning and spend 8+ hours/day away from your home, family, children, etc.?

    Truly, only you can answer that...but I can tell you, as a 51 y/o woman in her second semester of NS, that I obtained my first bachelor's degree in '99 in MIS (Management Information Systems) because I really didn't know what I wanted to do -- until about 75% of the way through the program and after 2 months on the job in IT. I was MISERABLE. That 2 months led to 6 years of absolutely hating getting up every morning, and of my family being miserable on Sunday nights because Mom had to get up to go to her job that she hated. The only thing I got out of that job was a handful of terrific friends and a decent 401(k).

    If you think being a dentist is what you're really interested in, forget the money for schooling. Apparently you will make that up in short time; I know my dentist isn't exactly eating Alpo for dinner. You're young and that will take care of itself. You will work more "human" hours as a dentist. You can call your own shots and be your own boss for the most part. Once you get established somewhere however, it will be difficult to pull up stakes and start over without that established patient base (I know, my husband's a chiropractor and we're pretty much stuck here for now).

    As a nurse, you will have some good options also, but you will still work a lot within the confines of someone else's rules about shifts, location, etc. You can, however, mostly pick up at a moment's notice and work just about anywhere across the U.S. and be paid from your first day on the job.

    I don't envy you having to make these decisions. I am hoping mostly you will honestly take a look at your heart and make your final decision based on how that feels, knowing that the rest will take care of itself.

    Best wishes!!:icon_hug:
  3. by   WestWingFan
    Quote from lucytaylor
    uhhh.. teaching... been there done that.
    :yeahthat: I shouldn't say that though, I loved teaching. I just was always torn because I also really wanted to be a nurse from when I was a kid--- I really wanted to do both. This is a great time for a career change for me. Well, this thread hasn't changed my mind (although the needle sticks and health risks sure does sound scary).
    Last edit by WestWingFan on Apr 29, '07
  4. by   cappuccino
    After 15 years of nursing I do feel like jumping ship sometimes. Then there are times when I come home feeling pretty good. About everything. About my job. The amount of money I make. My competence.... Then the cycle begins again and you get frustrated with staffing,administrative decisions,and the lack of ancillary help. It is a good career but a tough one. The great thing about nursing is that you have so many different career opportunities that can accomodate your family.......
  5. by   kristie778
    Quote from icegambit
    I found this thread very helpful. I have been deciding whether I should go into nursing or pursue being a dentist for almost two years now. I graduated with a BA in another field of study last year. I have been taking some science classes since graduation. Last year, I applied to an accelerated BSN program. A couple of months later, I found out that I have been accepted and the program starts in September 2007. If I choose to do the program, I will graduate with a BSN a year later.

    What I have been so confused about is whether I should be a dentist instead. I would really like to become a dentist but the time and money I need to invest in this career seem to hold me back. I figured that I will rack up about $200k in student loans by the time I graduate dental school. Also, I still need to take a few science classes so I won't be able to apply until the 2008 cycle (for the class entering in 2009).

    I know I'm still young (23 yrs. old), but I just want to start a career. I have nothing right now, no job, and no family to help me out. I figured that if I decide to do the nursing program, I could start working as a nurse by next year and then go for an advance degree (crna, msn or etc.). People have been telling me that I should do nursing and forget about dentistry. Dental school is just not practical and I would be drowning in loans by the time I graduate. If I do nursing, I could soon buy a house and do things I wanted to do but could not afford to do. I know that I should not look at the money, but its hard not to look at that aspect when you have nothing else.

    I have been debating with myself since I got the acceptance letter to the acc. BSN program last year. Now, I have two weeks to decide and, once again, I am completely lost. I have been looking at this website and trying to decide if I could make it as a nurse or if I will just be miserable if I choose this route. I thought about becoming a nurse and if I truly do not like it, pursue dentistry later on. However, the BSN program will cost me about $35,000 plus living expenses. I don't want to take on that much debt and then go for dentistry later, which will add more debt.

    I just feel so lost and confused.
    If dentistry is what you are believe you should do, then go for it! If you don't do what you truly feel you should, you might end up regretting it. Of course, you should work or shadow in a dental office if you haven't already, to make sure you really like it. You are still young, and the 4 years of dental school (plus the time you spend doing the science pre-reqs and applying) will pass whether or not you're in dental school. Keep in mind that if you get the BSN + advanced degree, particularly CRNA, that it will take at least one year of nursing experience, plus about 2 years of master's level degree courses after the BSN program, to reach your goals. So by the time you add it up, it would be only a little longer for the dental school route. And as for the 200K in student loans, you will be able to pay that off relatively easily with a dentist's salary. It's an INVESTMENT of time and money that will pay off. Don't go for the quick money at the expense of your future. Remember that you will be working for something like 30+ years - don't let the few years of school you need get you down, because it's a small amount when compared to your entire career! And believe me, it's easier to do it when you're younger. I did a BSN, knowing I should have done something different (because it was quicker) and now I regret that decision. Good luck with your decision!
  6. by   pnurseuwm
    I would also like to add that once you're in nursing it's damn hard to get out of. I was a nurse (BSN) for less than a year, I have a B.A. in another field as well. Now that I'm trying to get OUT of nursing, it's like trying to get a needle in a football field size mound of hay! You apply, apply, apply, maybe getting a few interviews and then POOF... nothing. Hiring managers feel since you have "all that education" you will jump ship for more money after a few months, or since you have less than 1 year of work experience you're "questionable," and will not even give you the time of day. I've known police officers to change careers to engineering, teachers who have gotten into television broadcasting.... but, dang it, a nurse trying to LEAVE the field? and boy you're in for an uphill battle.
    IF YOU'RE UNSURE DON'T DO IT!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
  7. by   tatarn2b2007
    Most people ask me why I am giving up my nice "cushy" job sitting at a desk and starring mindlessly at a computer all day to clean up body fluids. I have my answers. First, my job is not that cushy. I don't think nursing jobs will ever be outsourced to India or any other "low cost location." Second, I love to help people. Yes, there are times when I wish I didn't have to be near the patient for various reasons, but mostly they are great. I know it is not rainbows and butterflys, but I don't think any job is. Most people at my current job went to school for 4 years and are starting out at 16.50/hour. Like someone said, not to many professions offer 23.50/hr to start with an associates degree. I jokingly say to my coworkers that I would rather clean up poop than mindlessly type numbers into a computer for 8 hours. I hope I do not become negative about my new future as a nurse. If I do, I hope I am in a position to try something different in the field or make a change. Good luck to all my fellow May graduates! Congrats!
  8. by   kristie778
    Quote from pnurseuwm
    I would also like to add that once you're in nursing it's damn hard to get out of. I was a nurse (BSN) for less than a year, I have a B.A. in another field as well. Now that I'm trying to get OUT of nursing, it's like trying to get a needle in a football field size mound of hay! You apply, apply, apply, maybe getting a few interviews and then POOF... nothing. Hiring managers feel since you have "all that education" you will jump ship for more money after a few months, or since you have less than 1 year of work experience you're "questionable," and will not even give you the time of day. I've known police officers to change careers to engineering, teachers who have gotten into television broadcasting.... but, dang it, a nurse trying to LEAVE the field? and boy you're in for an uphill battle.
    IF YOU'RE UNSURE DON'T DO IT!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    SO true!! It really is hard to get out...and a lot of other nurses are trying to do something "better" so that is why there are so many people competing for master's level programs in nursing, and there SO many nurse practitioners. My mother-in-law is an NP and she said that she has precepted students who were told by their NP program to expect that it might take up to a year to find a job as an NP after they graduate. That's scary - but that just goes to show you all the unhappy nurses are trying to move up and get advanced degrees!
  9. by   pengoo2008
    Hope I don't get chewed out for this but...

    It really surprises me how many nurses adivise others NOT to go into nursing and really dislike their current positions.

    I understand nursing has plenty of negative aspects but it has one giant positive aspect and that is the high DEMAND for nurses. We are in demand and there are is a huge variety of settings in which a nurse can work.

    I feel like the majority of nurses who "hate" their nursing jobs probably are too unimaginative/lazy to find ones that suit them better. Disliking your job is one thing...but not doing anything about it is terrible for you, and probably your coworkers, patients and facility!

    If you don't like bedside nursing, move somewhere else...it isn't rocket science. I really doubt you would hate ALL of the many wonderful careers nurses have available to them, especially when you factor in the current job market.
  10. by   sas8536
    I live in South Carolina and I'm going back to school for nursing, an accelerated BSN/MSN program at MUSC. I have a master's degree in clinical counseling and after working in various settings such as group homes and mental health clinics, I had to leave because on top of the stress of combative adolescents and dual diagnosis patients with schizophrenia, I wasn't making enough money to support myself ($29,000) and had to work part time jobs in addition. = no free time to manage stress because I was too busy trying to pay bills!

    I'm attracted to nursing because the salary for an NP is about double for working with similar populations, which I do enjoy and I feel that I work well with these folks. Also, I know I have the self awareness to recognize when my health is suffering and to explore other settings. Nurses are EVERYWHERE- it's fantastic. My OB-GYN nurse is the happiest, sassiest person I know. My friend (BSN) has been on an adult ICU unit for about 2 years and loves it. A nurse at the group home where I worked cared so much for those kids and was respected like a grandmother-came to work every day with a smile on her face.

    Based on my personal experiences, I am confident that I can find a place in nursing where pay is satisfying to me and I'll love my work, despite it's ups and downs. Tip: I've been shadowing nurses all over the place down here for the last few weeks just to make sure. I recommend this to anyone who's thinking about nursing. Good luck to everyone!
  11. by   Epona
    Hi. I did not read through all 21 pages of posts, but did read quite a few. I wanted to add my thoughts.

    It appears that folks who are in nursing and dislike it are stuck in jobs they do not like. Try applying for another nursing job. There are many out there. If you don't like hospital floor nursing, for example, or the ER, try another avenue. No job is perfect, but nursing does afford us the luxury of moving around and there will always be a need for nurses.

    I am planning on going into public health or cardiac were I have a vested interest. Nurses love their craft WHEN THEY FIND A NICHE THAT FITS THEM. That I believe is the key!

    Good luck!
  12. by   kristie778
    Quote from pengoo2008
    Hope I don't get chewed out for this but...

    It really surprises me how many nurses adivise others NOT to go into nursing and really dislike their current positions.

    I understand nursing has plenty of negative aspects but it has one giant positive aspect and that is the high DEMAND for nurses. We are in demand and there are is a huge variety of settings in which a nurse can work.

    I feel like the majority of nurses who "hate" their nursing jobs probably are too unimaginative/lazy to find ones that suit them better. Disliking your job is one thing...but not doing anything about it is terrible for you, and probably your coworkers, patients and facility!

    If you don't like bedside nursing, move somewhere else...it isn't rocket science. I really doubt you would hate ALL of the many wonderful careers nurses have available to them, especially when you factor in the current job market.
    First off, I no longer work as a bedside nurse because I was "imaginative" enough to find a completely different field that suits me. However, I can still state my opinion about nursing as a career, because I have first-hand experience with it. Have you worked as a nurse? If you have and you like it, great - then share your opinion and don't call others names like "lazy" and "unimaginative" because their opinion differs from yours. If you haven't worked as a nurse, then you really shouldn't judge others who actually have first hand knowledge of the field, because you simply don't know where we're coming from.

    Also, have you considered WHY there is a huge demand of nurses? Do you think a job that is truly wonderful really would have such a large number of qualified people who could work in it, but choose not to? Why do you think there is a "shortage?" And yes, there are many varieties of jobs within nursing, but there are many unhappy nurses competing for those jobs (see my previous post about new grad NPs taking up to a year to find a job).
  13. by   pengoo2008
    If you haven't worked as a nurse, then you really shouldn't judge others who actually have first hand knowledge of the field, because you simply don't know where we're coming from.
    I am a student and no I have not worked as a nurse. But that doesn't mean I'm completely in the dark.

    Since you have worked as a nurse, I agree that you have an excellent perspective on the type of nursing you have done. However, there are many facets of nursing and unless you have worked or thoroughly explored each of them, your perspective also has its limitations.

    Also, have you considered WHY there is a huge demand of nurses? Do you think a job that is truly wonderful really would have such a large number of qualified people who could work in it, but choose not to? Why do you think there is a "shortage?" And yes, there are many varieties of jobs within nursing, but there are many unhappy nurses competing for those jobs (see my previous post about new grad NPs taking up to a year to find a job).
    In my humble opinion, the shortage is mainly caused by a lack of educators and the sheer number of nurses NEEDED by the healthcare system. I THINK (although I'm not positive) that nurses makeup the majority of employees at hospitals, this obviously leads to the higher demand as well.

    I think overall, nurses lack the support they need in the workplace which is contributing to turnover.

    and sorry for using the words lazy and unimaginative of me. Honestly, I could have phrased it in a more appropriate way but I suppose I was being lazy and unimaginative.

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