New nurse here. How do I overcome a suspension from work? - page 4

by BradenRN30 | 15,817 Views | 38 Comments

I recently got my RN about 5 months ago and have been employed on a medsurg unit. It is a very busy unit that is at times understaffed and it is a lot to adjust to. I started with 2 other nurses and we have all made mistakes,... Read More


  1. 4
    While it is nice that she reassured you, your misgivings are quite justified. I have seen situations where someone went through what you describe in your last post. They thought things were going fine but got whammied in the end. You can not let anxiety about "what ifs" deter you from your efforts to improve and move beyond this. Work on your relaxation techniques as well as improving your job performance and you should be ok. Best wishes.
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    "i did talk with my manager about the one nurse who seems to want to get me in trouble, and i also asked her to speak to some of the other nurses that i regularly work with (because i know they will say good things about me). she thanked me for letting her know and told me that one person alone is unlikely to get me into trouble, because she will see that it is always coming from the same person. she seemed to want to work with me on things, but i dont know how much i can trust this? what if she is just saying that so that i stay my year (my floor has a high, high turn over rate) and then right before it's up she fires me? i told her that i feel like i am walking on eggshells and i'm very worried. there are just so many things that can go wrong...... "

    yeah, well, you have a manager who is not firing your butt right now, says she wants to work c you, and knows that if there's only one person complaining about you it's more likely to be a personal issue so she's willing to let it pass for now, wants to work c you, and wants to work c you, and you have a problem c trusting that?

    dear, you are so inexperienced and you could be out on the sidewalk right now. think about that. you're drowning, she's offering you a life raft, and you think you might want to go for a longer swim instead. bad move. take the help she's offering you, make the most of it, and thank your lucky stars she's doing it.
    SHGR, chevyv, Spidey's mom, and 1 other like this.
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    For heaven's sake, take the offer of help.
    chevyv likes this.
  4. 4
    Quote from bradenrn30
    thanks for all your advice!! i am going to listen to it and count ltc out. i did talk with my manager about the one nurse who seems to want to get me in trouble, and i also asked her to speak to some of the other nurses that i regularly work with (because i know they will say good things about me). she thanked me for letting her know and told me that one person alone is unlikely to get me into trouble, because she will see that it is always coming from the same person. she seemed to want to work with me on things, but i dont know how much i can trust this? what if she is just saying that so that i stay my year (my floor has a high, high turn over rate) and then right before it's up she fires me? i told her that i feel like i am walking on eggshells and i'm very worried. there are just so many things that can go wrong......
    you have a manager who seems to want to work with you on things -- what in the world do you gain by not trusting this? what if she is just saying that so you stay your year? you stay a year, you work hard, you learn everything you can . . . and she probably won't fire you. it's to her advantage not to -- if she fires you, she just has to start all over teaching someone else. but if she does fire you, you have a whole year of experience, a year of income and a year to make contacts. you would be in a much better position to find a new job. what's not to trust with this scenario?
    perioddrama, SHGR, Merlyn, and 1 other like this.
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    Having been in a similar situation minus the mistake and suspension, I totally hear ya! I had great grades, great recommendations from clinical teachers, until one teacher who was known as a bully chose me as her victim. She pushed me into taking a medical leave from the course. When I came back, my confidence levels were in the dumps.
    My first job was what I thought would be my dream job. Super progressive mother-baby department. Turned into a text-book case of nurses eating their young. They threw me into a full patient load after a week long orientation before I even had my license. Forced me into mandatory over-time (totally illegal since I was still unlicensed, but I didnt know this) on a 7am-3pm shift when I was normally evenings, had done a girl a favor and taken her night shift. So of course, I was borderline braindead, crying. Patients felt I didnt teach them as well as I should have, and I got fired. Then there I was, got licensed shortly after, and was working as a waitress because I felt like such a failure as a nurse.
    It took me a while to gain the confidence I needed. I went agency, initially LTC. Let me tell you, even if you excelled in clinicals in school, it is so easy to miss something, just because you havent seen it before. Like others have said, LTC is no good as a fresh RN. Not only for your lack of experience, but you wont get to practice skills that are still new to you.
    Consider yourself lucky to have a nurse manager who wants to help you. That is what helped me learn and gain confidence. Other than the awesome cheat sheet idea others have mentioned (I also use different colors, and put my different systems to organize my evaluations properly), one of the things that helped me most when I doubted myself was what a colleague told me. She said that its ok to not know how to intervene. In fact, its normal because you are new. However, when you go ask someone for advice or help, dont just say "What do I do?". Say "This is happening to Mr. So-and-So. Here is what I think I should do. What do you think?" At least that way, even if you are wrong, you are showing some critical thinking abilities. Then your supervisor/manager/colleague at least knows where to go from there.


    On that note...please dont give up on yourself. If I had listened to what others had to say at times, I would have thought I was the worst nurse ever, not cut out for healthcare work, etc. And now here I am, with almost 3 years of med-surg and almost 2 of mother-baby, contemplating a Masters program. Remember, no one can bring you down unless you let them.
    perioddrama and anotherone like this.
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    Quote from jeweles26
    she said that its ok to not know how to intervene. in fact, its normal because you are new. however, when you go ask someone for advice or help, dont just say "what do i do?". say "this is happening to mr. so-and-so. here is what i think i should do. what do you think?" at least that way, even if you are wrong, you are showing some critical thinking abilities. then your supervisor/manager/colleague at least knows where to go from there.

    that is great advice, and i wish every new grad who says that someone has told her she asks "too many questions" would follow it!
  7. 0
    How close are you to that 1 year mark- Try applying to another place as a per deim, a second job. Just to have a foot in the door some where else. That way when you are therelong enough, you could get a good referrence from them, instead of the hospital your at.

    The problem with the tele you had- I had a similar problem. There were 2 new admits in the same room both were tele monitored. One new admit was mine, the other was another nurses. It was around 5P. The aid is responsible to hook each patient up to the tele box. All the tele boxes are sync'd to a specific bed on the monitor screen. The aid had them flip flopped. The aid is one of the other nurses daughter's who can do no wrong- if she spit on the floor that would be ok in this NM's eyes. well, little princess screwed up(little princess did alot of screwing up, insubordination, refusing to do EKG's when asked and could eat lunch all shift) but both us RN's took the fall for it because it was our job to check and make sure the right tele box was on the right patient. Needless to say: neither one of us received any formal discipline over it just a tongue lashing.. As for little princess-she went about her bratty merry way and kept doing what she does best- mouthing off and nothing!

    I can't see a 3 day suspension over this on a first mistake. I can see a verbal warning or a written warning and some remediation with the nurse educator about setting up tele on an new admit, with some help with priority and time managment skills.
  8. 0
    You need to get into another position, any open position, in acute care, either in the same hospital or preferably in a different hospital. Do not go to LTC, many nursing homes/skilled nursing facilities are stacked against the nurse in so many ways I cannot describe. It does sound like you need to get out of that particular workplace before you get fired. Maybe ask the manager to help you find a different place to go- she might even recommend you in order to get rid of you. I know what it's like to work in an environment where some people ignore each others little mistakes while picking on others little mistakes as a matter of office politics, or because the manager doesn't like how much overtime that person works and gets their cronies to nitpick the person to death. Find a way out, but don't jump from the frying pan into the fires of SNF.
  9. 0
    12/12

    RESIGN! don't let them fire you! I feel your pain. I was too put on suspension but mine was "suspension pending termination" as a new nurse I was devastated, this just happened at the beggining of this year. They didn't want me there. I knew they didn't want me there when among the "many complaints" was one which stated "I didn't smile" *****! I'm working! I'm a new nurse can you guys give a break?! so I quit. I couldn't fight it since this happened at the end of my orientation. End of the year and no job prospects anywhere and no $$$, but I have peace of mind and that is priceless.


    You're consumend with worry about this place and the idiot nurse manger is not your friend, believe me, she's looking after the hospital's financial well being, not you, not the patient's well being either, she's looking after the hospital bottom line, aka lawsuit, which will eat the hospital profits. You're expendable!


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