New Grad + Rough Start = Career Advice Needed

  1. 0
    Hi everyone. I recently graduated from a 2 Yr RN program and I started working in Telemetry, hoping that it would be a good place to start & learn pt care. While that may be true, for me it's turned out to be a VERY difficult experience & adjustment these last 3 months or so, from being a student. Tele is very fast paced and the patient load feels unreal. While the staff & Mngr have been very supportive, some have pointed out that Tele can be very difficult even for experienced nurses and tough for new grads. I asked about switching to Med/Surg on an 8 hr shift but there aren't any openings.

    Did I make the right choice starting in Tele? Would starting on a Med/Surg floor be better? Or maybe there're other areas I haven't considered. For example, I never would've considered the OR as a place for a new grad to start but (based on a posting I read here last week) maybe the OR has some advantages for a new grad like a longer orientation period. *shrug* What I really want is a setting where I can learn the clinical skills I need for patient care and where I have a chance to succeed. I'm also concerned that if I left this position w/things not working out, that could really hinder finding another job. :-(

    Well, any help or advice would be greatly appreciated. Thanks in advance.

    NJRN04
  2. 5 Comments so far...

  3. 0
    You made a good choice. There's a lot to learn on any floor. You're learning other things besides tele. You're learning delegation, time management, assessments, etc. etc. etc. It is completely normal to feel overwhelmed no matter where you work that first year. Hang in there, you're doing better than you think you are. There isn't a new grad anywhere that isn't going to tell you they didn't have the same feelings.
  4. 0
    If you can hang in there a little longer, I recommend giving it a try. As 3rdhiftguy said, most new grads have similar feelings for a while as they transition from student to professional. If the staff and your manager are being supportive, that says a lot of positive things about the unit you chose. I'd be sure to maintain your positive relationships with them and let them mentor you a little while longer before you make throw in the towel. You're lucky to have them and I would take full advantage of what they have to offer -- trying not to appear too needy and too desparate in their eyes. You want their help, advice, and support ... but you also want them to respect you at the same time. So, I would advise you to maintain your dignity while you seek their help and advice.

    Good luck,
    llg
  5. 0
    Thanks guys for the advice & encouragement. I know I'm lucky to be working w/some excellent people. It's tough to feel that you're not up to speed. Oh yeah & all the stress. I'll try to stick w/it and hopefully it'll get better, preferably soon! ;-) Thanks again.

    NJRN04


    Quote from llg
    If you can hang in there a little longer, I recommend giving it a try. As 3rdhiftguy said, most new grads have similar feelings for a while as they transition from student to professional. If the staff and your manager are being supportive, that says a lot of positive things about the unit you chose. I'd be sure to maintain your positive relationships with them and let them mentor you a little while longer before you make throw in the towel. You're lucky to have them and I would take full advantage of what they have to offer -- trying not to appear too needy and too desparate in their eyes. You want their help, advice, and support ... but you also want them to respect you at the same time. So, I would advise you to maintain your dignity while you seek their help and advice.

    Good luck,
    llg
  6. 0
    Don't second guess yourself. Starting your career in a critical care area is a great idea. I did it (a loooonnnnggg) time ago and found that I learned so much more that my classmates. I never got out on time for the first 6 months, it was just a matter of learning how to allocate time. I was doing all of my charting at the end of my shift. Give yourself time...all of a sudden it will click.
  7. 0
    Quote from NJRN04
    Hi everyone. I recently graduated from a 2 Yr RN program and I started working in Telemetry, hoping that it would be a good place to start & learn pt care. While that may be true, for me it's turned out to be a VERY difficult experience & adjustment these last 3 months or so, from being a student. Tele is very fast paced and the patient load feels unreal. While the staff & Mngr have been very supportive, some have pointed out that Tele can be very difficult even for experienced nurses and tough for new grads. I asked about switching to Med/Surg on an 8 hr shift but there aren't any openings.

    Did I make the right choice starting in Tele? Would starting on a Med/Surg floor be better? Or maybe there're other areas I haven't considered. For example, I never would've considered the OR as a place for a new grad to start but (based on a posting I read here last week) maybe the OR has some advantages for a new grad like a longer orientation period. *shrug* What I really want is a setting where I can learn the clinical skills I need for patient care and where I have a chance to succeed. I'm also concerned that if I left this position w/things not working out, that could really hinder finding another job. :-(

    Well, any help or advice would be greatly appreciated. Thanks in advance.

    NJRN04
    Hank in there!!! Maybe concider ICU. We spend a lot of time and money training our GNs in the PICU that I work for. The training is very good and it is nice to really have 1 to 1 training and concentrating on 1 - 2 patients is great. jThink about it. It is actually SAFER than being thrown into a med-surg situation. Good luck. Kris


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