New Grad Leaving Hospital for Office Job - page 6

Hello everyone,Just need some advice on leaving a hospital job for office work. I just graduated a few months ago, and took a job in a hospital. At first I absolutely loved it, but now I hate it and no longer want to work in a... Read More

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    Are you going to feel better when you are changing out printer cartridges? Seriously office work can be quite demeaning as well. Just something to think about.

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    Quote from IcySageNurse
    And after having a patient diarrhea all over the bed while working in med/surg and me being the one expected to clean it, I just decided to throw in the towel. It's not worth it for the pay, really.
    I'm sorry...are you really serious?

    I do this for free, it's part of being a mom.
    CLoGreenEyes, 4EurSole, and cp1024 like this.
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    Quote from T-Bird78
    Really? How many office jobs have you held? You may not have the same type of patients in an office as you do in an acute care setting but you DO have patients and physicians.
    um, I'm crystal clear on what happens in a primary care office. I run one. I don't know how many APNs have responded in the thread in total, but I think I was the first. And yeah, the OP needs acute care experience. But don't take my word for it. After all, I'm just an independent DNP provider running my own successful practice. I probably have no idea what I'm taking about.
    Surprised1, Esme12, NRSKarenRN, and 2 others like this.
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    "After all, I'm just an independent DNP provider running my own successful practice. I probably have no idea what I'm taking about."


    That was funny. I was an office nurse for over a decade and my advice was to get at least some acute care experience (couple of years) also. I often disagree with you Devil, but not on this one.
    nursel56 likes this.
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    Thank you everyone for advice. It seems most people think working in a hospital for a few years is necessary...but I just can't. I became a nurse soley to be an NP - I'm unhappy as an RN, I hate blindly following orders and not taking on any sort of provider role. I feel like I'm wasting my potential and the thought of spending a few years doing this, as many have suggested, sounds like complete misery. Kudos to all of you that can handle such a position, but I cannot. If being an NP will not work out without hospital work I will look into PA school and medical school.
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    I've been following this thread and now feel compelled to respond.

    Of course you're uncomfortable as a new RN--you're not that good at. This isn't a dig on you personally. It takes a long time to get used to being a working nurse. It's far different than nursing school. Maybe bedside nursing isn't for you, but a few months is no indicator of success in the role.

    How much clinical experience did you have a student? I'm floored that a person can actually make it through school without realizing what nurses do. If nothing else, your posts will serve as a good warning for students to research what they are getting into before they spend years of their lives and thousands of dollars on a career they hate.

    Finally, there is the notion that nurses "blindly follow orders" and are "wasting their potential." I was going to respond, but this is so demonstrably false, it really doesn't deserve rebuttal. If you truly believe these things to be true, you went to a terrible nursing school and work for an even worse facility.
    Esme12, NRSKarenRN, CLoGreenEyes, and 3 others like this.
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    We have a great PA program here in North Texas if you decide to go that route.

    Do what will make you happy and not miserable. It is fine not to enjoy nursing. It means nothing about your worth as a human being. There are many nursing jobs that do not consist of that type of patient contact that you can do while you return to school.
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    CrunchRN]We have a great PA program here in North Texas if you decide to go that route.
    Actually it was a PA who took me under her wing when I worked at the doc's office. She wanted to get rid of my "nurse brain" and started off with the very first patient asking me differential diagnosis questions. She was a middle-aged, cantankerous, gay, rancher who branded cattle and rode horses. I responded to an emergency with her at a lumber mill across the street from the clinic and started my first IV outside of the training in nursing school.

    She died a couple of years ago. I so appreciated all she did for me.
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    Quote from helloberry
    I'm sorry if this offends you, but your post kind of makes it sound like you don't like your job because you have to work... 'cleaning excreatment'?? That's simple patient care... It sounds like you want the rewards of nursing without the 'dirty' work. This maybe the opposite of how you feel, but that's the impression I get from your post. I agree w/ the PP that an office job will not give you any of the needed experience & may even set you back.
    I found this post to be unreasonably mean. Yeah, it's simple patient care, but she doesn't want to do it and that's her perogative. I hate it when people keep trying to kick others out of the field, who want to be in it, but want to take a more alternative route. It's possible.

    OP, to be honest with you I've been looking at Grad schools myself and there are schools who are willing to take you right out of a BSN program. You have to have the grades and stuff and pass the GRE, but schools do take you if it's what you want. I even have a professor who went straight to grad school, skipping the work part, and did very well for herself. So, it's possible.
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    Quote from IcySageNurse
    Thank you everyone for advice. It seems most people think working in a hospital for a few years is necessary...but I just can't. I became a nurse soley to be an NP - I'm unhappy as an RN, I hate blindly following orders and not taking on any sort of provider role. I feel like I'm wasting my potential and the thought of spending a few years doing this, as many have suggested, sounds like complete misery. Kudos to all of you that can handle such a position, but I cannot. If being an NP will not work out without hospital work I will look into PA school and medical school.
    You really don't have to. Many of those responding here have their own views and experience. it's what worked for them. I will say that a lot of grad schools do require you to have 2 yrs experience minimum in acute care and at the bedside, but there are other schools as well that don't. So try to find those and ask around. Do you.


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