New Grad Leaving Hospital for Office Job - page 4

by IcySageNurse 9,802 Views | 77 Comments

Hello everyone,Just need some advice on leaving a hospital job for office work. I just graduated a few months ago, and took a job in a hospital. At first I absolutely loved it, but now I hate it and no longer want to work in a... Read More


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    I was a new grad in 2011 landed that hospital job on a busy neuro/trauma unit, was quite overwhelmed, shifts where I would cry, didn't feel like I knew what I was doing and after only 4 months I left for a job in a speciality practice, because I said the same thing, floor nursing just isn't for me, I hate it! My nurse manager and director said "your doing yourself a dis-service, you need to give it and yourself a chance" Hey, I figured I'm 40+ years old, I know what I want, I don't need to be miserable, etc. so I left. 7 months later, I feel like I did do myself a disservice by not giving myself a chance, at least to stick it out that 1st year, I feel I would have gained valuable experience to put it all together, if you know what I mean, experience that I am not gaining in a speciality office. Now working in a primary care office, you will see a lot more, but I can tell you there will be tons of calls, parents and families to deal with, filling prescriptions, setting appointments, etc.

    While I know it don't care for floor nursing, I also know I probably should have stuck it for a little a while. Think long and hard about it, see if you can't shadow for a day to see what it's really like, talk to a trusted friend, talk to other NP's to get their perspective, maybe they wish they had been a floor nurse, etc.

    Good luck with whatever you decide, only you know what is best for you.
    Esme12 and kimbap like this.
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    BAHAhahahahahaha!!!! Are you serious?? LOL... being a nurse is a thankless job but it is very educational with us seeing much more than the doctors do because we are in the field. Good luck with the rest of your schooling!
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    The only thing to consider is where you want to finally practice as an FNP. If its office or clinic that is where you need to be. Floor nursing doesn't give you any experience these days except, well, there just isn't much. You won't participate in any kind of dx as an RN on the floor, you won't have time to ponder much of anything really. Years go by and maybe you are better and faster at charting and tossing med/vomit/poop (in or out) and ignoring irritating coworkers so you can go home on time - golf clap.

    Hospital nursing has nothing to do with clinic or office nursing. In office nursing these days, a nurse is not often hired unless the MD wants another brain. Tasks are for MAs. It's big on the cognitive, whereas hospital nursing has turned to being big on the waitress/housekeeping duties. Too bad, but why do you think most will leave if he economy gets better? Better to use your brain while you still remember your patho and drugs.

    Go to private practice and make the most of it.

    I'll add that most networks are not looking to expand anything "hospital" but they are looking to expand in practices and clinics - they need a nurse who is not a task monkey, they need a thinker. Lots of nurses won't be able to handle this. They can no longer think or communicate or collaborate simply because they were in the hospital too long - to hard to erase the damage.
    Last edit by netglow on Dec 5, '12
    barnstormin' likes this.
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    I am still new at it but I love nursing because of our intimate role with patients (no not the poop especialy haha). We get to be the eyes and the ears and even the noses. Doctors have their fancy diagnostics and 5 minutes with the patient but we are the ones that spend time and find out histories. Some of the best assessments are done while bathing patients. i would not want any CNA to take away this opportunity. NPs are still nurses, they practice a more advanced form of nursing with more responsibilties but it is still nursing, not medicine
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    Quote from netglow
    The only thing to consider is where you want to finally practice as an FNP. If its office or clinic that is where you need to be. Floor nursing doesn't give you any experience these days except, well, there just isn't much. You won't participate in any kind of dx as an RN on the floor, you won't have time to ponder much of anything really. Years go by and maybe you are better and faster at charting and tossing med/vomit/poop (in or out) and ignoring irritating coworkers so you can go home on time - golf clap.Hospital nursing has nothing to do with clinic or office nursing. In office nursing these days, a nurse is not often hired unless the MD wants another brain. Tasks are for MAs. It's big on the cognitive, whereas hospital nursing has turned to being big on the waitress/housekeeping duties. Too bad, but why do you think most will leave if he economy gets better? Better to use your brain while you still remember your patho and drugs.Go to private practice and make the most of it.I'll add that most networks are not looking to expand anything "hospital" but they are looking to expand in practices and clinics - they need a nurse who is not a task monkey, they need a thinker. Lots of nurses won't be able to handle this. They can no longer think or communicate or collaborate simply because they were in the hospital too long - to hard to erase the damage.
    Thank all of you latest posters - I was starting to think all nurses were this crabby! And I agree with the quoted above...as a floor nurse, I feel I do learn more nursing skills...but these are skills I would rarely use as a provider. In an office, wouldn't I be doing a lot more thinking in terms of triaging and seeing patients, etc. in a hospital you don't seem to do as much critical thinking, ICU aside.
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    I'm glad you're finally getting the answers you wanted.
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    Quote from IcySageNurse

    My point here is, PAs and NPs are both midlevels.

    Do NPs HAVE to work in a hospital to have the ability to be a good NP? Do NP programs themselves not teach the required information neccesary to diagnosis and treat without one having prior experience in a hospital?

    I just want an honest answer here so I can plan accordingly.

    I am very, very booksmart, and that's what we need in the NP world. As a patient, I would rather have a well-educated competent NP than one who tells me she happily cleaned up poop before becoming an NP. We are all different, and there is a place for all of us in the world of nursing. I have every right to be an NP, and while I may not be happy about cleaning up excrement, I think my intelligence will make up for that as a provider.
    So much juicy goodness, but I snipped the best parts. I will address these one at a time.

    First, just as an FYI, speaking only for myself, I am not a "middle" level anything, thanks very much. I have attained the terminal degree in my field and am at the very peak of my profession.

    Regarding your second and third comments, I addressed this for you already. I regret that you did not like the response. I gave you the "honest answer" you requested so you could "plan accordingly." To reiterate, yes, you need probably 5 years of acute care experience if you want to be competitive to a quality NP program and if you want to perform well. What you do not have to do is stay exactly where you are at the present time if it is making you unhappy. There are other a myriad of other acute care learning opportunities available to you, I'm certain. Look for one you do not actively despise so much.

    Regarding the final comment, book smart helps, but no, it is simply not enough. Experience will make you or break you, and compassion will make the difference between a full panel and an empty one. And of course, it should go without saying that you have no such "right" to be a NP. None of us has. That is a patently ridiculous assertion. You do have the right to strive to be one. At the end of the day, you are entitled to nothing more than that. Best of luck.
    NRSKarenRN, 4EurSole, nyteshade, and 5 others like this.
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    I hated clinicals in the hospital setting. As soon as I got my LPN degree, i started working in an assisted living facility and have continued working there after getting my RN. I am now almost finished with my BSN and looking at NP programs. I want to focus on geriatrics, so I feel with the path I have chosen, I don't think the hospital would benefit me much. Not sure how much a doctors office would help, but not everyone likes the hospitals!!!
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    Hospital is the way to go. Office doesn't have much of anything to offer you for FNP no matter who you work with and whatever you do there.

    And by the way, if boosting a patient or cleaning up poop is the hardest thing you do as a nurse, then you are either lucky or you don't know what you're doing. Heck, I wish I could complain about those too. Those are the last things on my stressors list as a nurse on the floor.
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    The reason you are getting the answer you have received is because your posts are offensive.

    I do not like beside nursing period. I'm in school for another bachelors degree to get away from the bedside. Then after I graduate with the 2nd bachelors degree I'm headed to law school for healthcare law.

    With that said I would never ever say that bedside nursing is demeaning. Are you kidding? Just because you don't like it doesn't make it demeaning and beneath you. You have insulted a lot of the members on this site just by saying that. What you should have said was I don't like bedside nursing do I have to do it to become an NP. Trust me none one likes cleaning up poop. I know I don't and I'm not one to just leave them sitting in it to run find the PCT. Heck I cleaned up a code brown today twice. I have had doctors help clean patients up. Cleaning up poop is the least of my worries working at the bedside.

    If you take the other job you might want to work PRN in the hospital to remain competitive for the NP program. And think about what you post on this site. Don't ask for advice and insult the people you are asking the advice from. Maybe you should look into medical school instead of becoming a NP.
    cp1024 and scrubsandasmile like this.


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