New Grad Leaving Hospital for Office Job - page 3

Hello everyone,Just need some advice on leaving a hospital job for office work. I just graduated a few months ago, and took a job in a hospital. At first I absolutely loved it, but now I hate it and no longer want to work in a... Read More

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    Quote from mclennan
    It's a running joke on this forum that many people come here asking for advice, and when they are told things they don't wanna hear, they predictably become defensive and angry. Way to keep the stereotype going. All the book smarts in the world can't teach character. Yano?

    The best NPs I know have an equal balance of book smarts and background in POOP. What really matters is the ETHIC and VIRTUE that you need to demonstrate that you'd never, ever see any patient care, from cleaning POOP to using Euclidian Geometric Philosophy to project their ejection fraction or whatever - as "beneath" you or "icky." It's the CONCEPT, the IDEA that you'd apply such elitist thinking to someone lying there in their own diarrhea.....before you've even APPLIED to NP school that is going to get you in trouble. NPs are wonderful but they are NOT doctors and not PAs. Their training comes from a nursing perspective, that which you sorely lack. I also came into nursing with a bunch of academic trophies and medals and degrees and book smarts, blah blah who cares. That patient lying there in their own POOP doesn't give a flying fig about your Yale diploma. I can guarantee that.
    Absolutely. Book smarts, board certifications, high GPA: I have them too along with plenty of other nurses. OP you are not unique in your academic achievement. Nursing care is patient centered, not provider centered. There is not a lot of prestige in providing basic nursing care, but that basic care is critically important to the patient. Instead of thinking about your own feelings and needs, please try to put yourself in the place of a very sick patient with diarrhea, and think of their needs and feelings.
    Last edit by Susie2310 on Dec 5, '12
    wantccu, cp1024, and Sun0408 like this.

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    In honesty, this post is borderline offensive. Someday you might be siting in your own excrement. Sorry if you think I'm catty and mean by having just said that but honestly---I provided care for total care patients for years. And I would not be where I am today without my experiences. It's basic nursing care. And don't forget you have to learn how to walk before you can run. Take that med surg experience and learn as much as you possibly can. It doesn't mean you'll be swimming in a sea of poop to get your experience.
    cp1024 likes this.
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    Listen everyone, I do not mean to come across as elitist toward my patients or other nurses. Quite the contrary, I entered nursing to care for people. As a nurse, I have had my fair share of "nastiness" working on a med surg floor. While it did gross me out, each and every time, I did what I needed to do to help the patient. Did I enjoy it? Not one bit. But I would NEVER leave a patient to sit in anything - I kept my patients completely clean and did what I needed to do and made sure no one ever felt bad about it. Now, despite that, I am simply saying that I do not enjoy doing this, and I find in med surg I am doing this at least once per day. I want to leave that and go to an office position where I can help people and learn what I need to go into primary care without feeling nauseous all the time. I simply want to know if working in an office will still prepare me to be an FNP? As for the demeaning comment - I suppose I feel that as nurses have 4 year college degrees, we shouldn't be doing something so nasty. In our society, more education typically means doing less labor and using your brain more. I feel that nurses should do procedures, assess patients, etc, but I believe that techs and CNAs should clean patients when they make a mess, poop, etc. you guys can attack me for this all you want, but I think nurses work harder than any other person on a unit and some of the things we do that are mainly labor intensive (lifting patients, cleaning patients) should go to those that don't have the same level of education as nurses.

    One last point - there are direct entry FNP programs for non nurses. They don't work on the floor at all. I would at least have some experience over them, right?
    Last edit by IcySageNurse on Dec 5, '12
    Dia1234 likes this.
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    Quote from IcySageNurse
    Here we go. I'm so sick of nurses that think every freakin nurse on the planet is required to clean up poop and other things that 99% of the population wouldn't even dream of doing. There are plenty of nurses that work OUTSIDE of med/surg - in clinics, radiology, etc. And I've even heard a nurse comment that she worked in radiology so she didn't have to deal with all the nasty stuff. Does that make her less of a nurse? No, nor does it make me less of one. I am allowed to not want to do something filthy and still further my education without the snide remarks of other nurses. Must this profession be so catty?

    My point here is, PAs and NPs are both midlevels. They are educated in different models, but still function very similarly in a medical setting, hence why many jobs request a PA or NP for a particular position. In PA programs, all of the knowledge necessary to be a PA is IN the program. They learn about medications, diseases, etc from their training in PA school. Is this NOT similar to NP school? Do NPs HAVE to work in a hospital to have the ability to be a good NP? Do NP programs themselves not teach the required information necessary to diagnosis and treat without one having prior experience in a hospital?

    I just want an honest answer here so I can plan accordingly. I know that in nursing, people seem to value someone willing to clean up poop over someone who is book smart - I think that's a little backwards once you get to the provider level. I am an extremely intelligent person, very book smart, with a previous degree in Biology from Yale University. I entered an accelerated BSN program and graduated top of my class with a 4.0 and honors. I am very, very book smart, and that's what we need in the NP world. As a patient, I would rather have a well-educated competent NP than one who tells me she happily cleaned up poop before becoming an NP. We are all different, and there is a place for all of us in the world of nursing. I have every right to be an NP, and while I may not be happy about cleaning up excrement, I think my intelligence will make up for that as a provider.
    I think you have been given some great advice......it would be better to get your basic skills down and assessment skills down to be the best Nurse Practitioner....for even though you will seek an advanced degree...you are still a RN first. PA school and NP school are different animals. The NP program will begin on the basis that you are seeking an advanced nursing degree which means you have a firm grasp on the basics. PA school and NP school are different animal with different focuses.

    Many credible NP schools will look at your practical experience to make you a competitive applicant. That you worked in a office will not give you that competitive edge. knowing where you came from will light your way to the future. By saying that the standard duty of being a nurse is demeaning is disrespectful of all those nurses who choose to care for those patients at the bedside .....where would those patients be without these people. It's not the "poop" cleaning that will make you a superior NP.....it is knowing the day to day grind of caring for these sick and frightened patients to give you the best insight/assessment skills on how to best care for them and gain the respect of your peers.

    For although you want to pursue an advanced degree...you will always be, at the end of the day..." a Nurse"
    nursel56, cp1024, kelzfuturenurse, and 1 other like this.
  5. 3
    Quote from IcySageNurse
    Listen everyone,I do not mean to come across as elitist toward my patients or other nurses. Quite the contrary, I entered nursing to care for people. As a nurse, I have had my fair share of "nastiness" working on a med surg floor. While it did gross me out, each and every time, I did what I needed to do to help the patient. Did I enjoy it? Not one bit. But I would NEVER leave a patient to sit in anything - I kept my patients completely clean and did what I needed to do and made sure no one ever felt bad about it. Now, despite that, I am simply saying that I do not enjoy doing this, and I find in med surg I am doing this at least once per day. I want to leave that and go to an office position where I can help people and learn what I need to go into primary care without feeling nauseous all the time. I simply want to know if working in an office will still prepare me to be an FNP?As for the demeaning comment - I suppose I feel that as nurses have 4year college degrees, we shouldn't be doing something so nasty. I our society, more education typically means doing less labor and using your brain more. I feel that nurses should do procedures, assess patients, etc, but I believe that techs and CNAs should clean patients when they make a mess, poop, etc. you guys can attack me for this all you want, but I think nurses work harder than another person on a unit and some of the things we do that are mainly labor intensive (lifting patients, cleaning patients) should go to those that don't have the same level of education as nurses.
    Wow......I'm sorry.... I am seldom speechless......I am sorry your were mislead into thinking that nursing didn't have a gritty dirty side......but I have done all of those things......using my brain, doing procedures, assess patients, and wiped more than my fair share of behinds........but I have never begrudged the "dirty jobs" nor have I EVER felt I was above them. I might have not enjoyed it but I never felt my college education made me too superior to perform them. I have had an exemplary career that I am VERY proud of.......

    I wish you the best.
    Last edit by Esme12 on Dec 5, '12
    ProfRN4, cp1024, and Sun0408 like this.
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    My comments . .

    Quote from IcySageNurse
    Listen everyone, I do not mean to come across as elitist toward my patients or other nurses.
    Quote from IcySageNurse
    Really??

    Quite the contrary, I entered nursing to care for people.

    But only clean, neat and highly appreciative people, right?

    I simply want to know if working in an office will still prepare me to be an FNP?

    Nope - However, check program admission requirements since your mileage may vary.

    I suppose I feel that as nurses have 4 year college degrees, we shouldn't be doing something so nasty.

    PP's (including me) feel that calling any aspect of patient care "nasty" is, in itself, offensive.

    I think nurses work harder than any other person on a unit and some of the things we do that are mainly labor intensive (lifting patients, cleaning patients) should go to those that don't have the same level of education as nurses.
    I'll bet you're very popular with all those 'lesser beings' that are lucky enough to work with such a 'highly educated' person.

    I realize that I'm being an old grouch, but as an extremely tenured crusty old bat (who has been on the receiving end of the patient care experience lately) I feel confident about advising you to take that office job ASAP.
    Last edit by HouTx on Dec 5, '12 : Reason: clarity
    EmTheNewRN, nursel56, ProfRN4, and 7 others like this.
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    It seems like everyone is just saying get ur experience first. Why not switch to acute care or an outpatient clinic? And all the questions u have perhaps address them to APN section on here. You might get the response u are looking for. BEST OF LUCK!!!!
    netglow likes this.
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    If you know what school you want to attend for your NP I would contact them and see what the requirements are for acceptance. I know that the clinical portion of it may be affected because the NP preceptors tend to only accept students with applicable experience. If your office job will allow you a lot of autonomy and assissting it might work out for you. I would also look at job postings in your area for NP's and maybe call them just to see what you can find out about their take on it. Does it matter to a hospital or clinic looking to hire an NP or just how much poop you've cleaned, or is the fact that you have achieved a higher level of training and have the degree to show it carry more weight? When people say you get a good look at the disease process I have to wonder, I'm in icu and I only see the end of the process so I never get to be involved in prevention or the beginning process, whereas in the clinic you are in the primary and secondary stages. Why is that clinic education not considered valuable? Isn't an important part of nursing about teaching and prevention? BTW, I have not had any NP's volunteer to clean up a patient, they let me know so I can do it lol.

    It's actually a pretty interesting question I think, it's too bad people got so defensive and you were flamed by so many posters.................oop: I guess poop is a pretty highly charged subject.
  9. 1
    Dang folks....it's just poop. I clean up after my animals and wipe my friends' babies' butts all the time, what's the difference if it
    comes out of an adult human? At the end of the day, even Bill Gates and the President take oop:s.
    KelRN215 likes this.
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    My advice would be to actually move more towards the critical care area. HOWEVER there are no techs and you would be doing more hands on there but the experience especially in the assessment area would be invaluable to you. Working in an office I don't feel you would gain the skills needed for a nurse practioner. Personally I want the NP who has worked on the floor for years in addition to having the book smarts. You can have the book smarts and knowledge all you want, but if you haven't learned how to apply them it does no good. You have to develop that spidey sense of when something is about to go really really wrong. Several NP's I see actually go round the MD's in the hospital before clinic hours or afterwards. You need to be able to assess those critical pt's. You need to be able to confidently assist with the procedures he/she will need to you to preform in that setting. You need to be able to assess when that pt doesn't look quite right even though all of their VS say otherwise. Mostly in the clinic setting you to hand out an script and send them on their way, but if you don't have that sense to know when something is other that you may send someone on their way that really needs to go to the hospital instead. And as a side note, I would rather have a NP with floor experience and an ICU backround than a PA any day. And that bath is a great way to do a FULL skin assessment rather than a quick turn. I found stage 4 metastatic breast cancer in a pt by just giving her a bath first thing that morning when the tech was busy.


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