need advice on what to say after losing previous job

  1. 0
    I recently resigned from a position on a very busy cardio-thoracic floor due to some problems. I learned a great deal and had a great experience on this floor. I am now in the job market again and wondering what I should say at my first interview on TUes when the interviewer asks me why I left this job. Do I tell him or her honestly why I left and risk not getting the job because I was honest? Or do I gloss over it and say that I wanted to work in another venue like long term care or home care?
    I know that honesty is the best policy but it seems you lose when it comes to impressing hiring officials.
    ANy advice would be greatly appreciated.

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  2. 8 Comments...

  3. 0
    You said in your thread starter you lost your job, but then said you resigned. They sound like different issues. I have not found that too many interviewers delve deeply into the reasons you left, if your references check out. I put on the application something benign like, moved, explore new horizons in nursing, etc. It depends on why you really left and what you are planning to do. If you are changing radically like from floor nursing to home health, then say you wanted to try something different in nursing, or you wanted a different schedule...something fairly evasive if needed. I would not go into personality issues, problems with managment etc. because it makes you look like a complainer. I think the less you say negatively about your previous position, the better. Emphasize why you want the new job, not why you left the previous one.
  4. 0
    I think it really depends on the "problems" you had. It also depends on what your letter of resignation stated (if you did indeed resign), because you kind of need to be consistant, in case they check references.
  5. 0
    Get a copy of your last evaluation, if it was mostly positive, and say that there were some issues that couldn't be worked out. You'll have dealt honestly with the bad, and emphasized the good, even if you don't have references from the old job you'll have proof of your hard work.
  6. 0
    Thanks for all your advice. So far, I have one job offer on the table and expecting 2 more responses in the next few days. As a point of clarification, I was having some difficulties at work and decided that it would be best to resign from my position.
  7. 0
    Have you identified the kind of environment where you do your best and are happiest on the job??

    I would simply say although you learned a lot at that job, you felt you and the position were no longer a good fit; you can say you've evolved, grown... have new challenges you wish to explore, etc. You might also say that due to this you felt you weren't doing your best work. If they ask for clarification, you have a chance to steer the interview towards what kind of workplace bring out the best in you, and get some insight about their workplace conditions.

    Although this approach hasn't always gotten me every job offer I interviewed for, it HAS weeded out positions where I knew I would not be happy. Remember you are interviewing THEM too and looking for that 'good fit' for you..

    Good luck. I'm a firm believer that just because somebody loses a job, this needn't automatically reflect poorly on them. We have to be honest with ourselves about what happened in the failed job, though, and do some soulsearching to find out our role in it so we can move on and make a better decision in future jobs.
  8. 0
    I too am having a similar problem with my previous job. I was hired in at a nursing home in late march of this year. I didn't even get to work there, but two months!!!!! I was called in the DON office and she stated that my head was not into my work, and she said to go home. She called me the next day and told me she couldnt have me continue employment there. I was and still am p**sed off bad! I am finding a terrible time getting return calls for jobs that i have been applying for, and I finally filed for unemployment in August, but it will soon run out before the end of this year. So does this mean I wasnt at fault if I recieved it? How do I go about getting a copy of my references from them to find out if they have given me a bad one? I know that when I talked to the DON last, I asked her if she would give me a bad references and she said no that she would just give the dates employed there. This is crazy! I mean, I feel so lost as to what happened to me, then a girl I use to work with there calls me and tells me that people talked bad about me when I left, I even had one girl tell my friend that the reason I was fired was because I gave the wrong medicine to a patient and harmed them very badly. If that was the case, why wasnt this addressed to me by the DON instead of word of mouth? and wouldnt I have a penalty against my license? BTW I am an LPN. My license are due for renewal here soon, and I am getting second thoughts on wether I should continue nursing, I graduated August of 2003, and have had one other job at a hospital for 4 months and decided to find a different speciality of nursing, and I gave my notice....does anyone think this was a personal conflict issue? what then? Also, I come to find out that my position was left open for a good 4 weeks after I left.....this is very odd to me. Why can't I find a job now? I checked my status online and it says my lic are still active. Should I call the Health Bureau and find out why I am not even getting phone calls when I put my app in for open positions? Please what do I do? Any advice please!!!!!!!!! I'm about to quit nursing altogether I am so depressed...and here I was thinking of going back for my ADN, but can I with lil job experience go back to get my Associates? I hear you have to at least have 1 year work experience to get in the LPN to RN transition program :uhoh21:


    Quote from mattsmom81
    Have you identified the kind of environment where you do your best and are happiest on the job??

    I would simply say although you learned a lot at that job, you felt you and the position were no longer a good fit; you can say you've evolved, grown... have new challenges you wish to explore, etc. You might also say that due to this you felt you weren't doing your best work. If they ask for clarification, you have a chance to steer the interview towards what kind of workplace bring out the best in you, and get some insight about their workplace conditions.

    Although this approach hasn't always gotten me every job offer I interviewed for, it HAS weeded out positions where I knew I would not be happy. Remember you are interviewing THEM too and looking for that 'good fit' for you..

    Good luck. I'm a firm believer that just because somebody loses a job, this needn't automatically reflect poorly on them. We have to be honest with ourselves about what happened in the failed job, though, and do some soulsearching to find out our role in it so we can move on and make a better decision in future jobs.
  9. 0
    Forget LTC.

    It's a dead end.

    Get a job at a good hospital.
  10. 0
    Having interviewed many employees for 2 years, I can suggest that you never Lie, yet never feel compelled to go into great details, and just DON't There are laws that prohibit many personal questions to protect you in the hiring process.

    That being said. "I worked a very busy unit where I learned (or mastered) skills such as.....during my employment I realized that the type of unit and I were a poor fit and I resigned. In the past several months of looking for employment I've (either been able to settle personal difficulties... be vague yet to the point), or I've evaluated the type of nursing that is best suited for my skills and this is what I can offer you as a staff nurse.

    I regret having a sub-standard reference and have evaluated what I need to change in a future position to correct those issues... may I elaborate?

    NEVER, NEVER.. no matter how justified, trash a previous employer, focus on how you've adapted to situation and have grown professionally from it.

    Then realize that you are worthy, skilled and in demand... ask what the facility can offer you in growth, what is the facility doing to correct the nursing shortage, what are their ratios of turnover? Is there a clinical ladder? How much training will be provided to ensure your success..

    These are all points that prove you are a stable and motivated employee, interested in professional growth... and looking for the right place for you, not just to fill a hole for them, while tooting you're own horn by recognising the past with a plan for success for the future.

    you can do it, being patient in the process is hard. Don't settle for something you know is short term, postitions like this DO add up on a resume, and with your licensure, you can't hide your past work. It isn't worth looking like a job hopper.


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