My Story / Mayo Clinic

  1. 0
    Hello my fellow nurses. It is great to finally find a message board and be able to discuss my new career with those much wiser than I. Let me start off by saying my story and what crossroads I am approaching.

    I am a student at Pittsburg State University in Kansas. I will graduate with my BSN in May and am counting down the moments. For years I had the plan to become a C.R.N.A., it was my goal and pretty much what I had my heart set on. Then, last summer, I worked as a patient care tech in an ER and loved it, as well as the doctors I worked with. About 4 weeks ago I decided I wanted to try (after school) to go back, take a few classes and go to Medical School to become a Dr. of Emergency Medicine. If this did not come to pass I wished to go for my DNP. But, thinking I was going to become a C.R.N.A. I had applied only to ICUís, but with ER really what I was striving for. I scurried and applied to an ER and was left with two choices

    Thinking I wanted ER and didnít have much interest in ICU, I interviewed at University Hospital in Columbia, MO for an ER position. Having already scheduled an interview at Mayo Clinic from before, I decided to go on it, just almost to see the facilities. I was absolutely blown away by Mayo (even with not wishing to do ICU as much as I had before) I was very impressed by Mayo and how the hospital and staff worked. So (I have not been offered either job, it will be a few weeks before I know in either) I am really in a tough decision. I am between ER (which I love to practice and get great satisfaction from) at Columbia and the ICU at Mayo (which I loved, but didnít know I did until I went to see it).

    Part of the appeal to me for Mayo is that Iíve grown up my whole life in Missouri (SW Missouri) and Minnesota is like a foreign land to me, so it is very interesting and new. I am single with no children and have an adventurous side, so Mayo takes me in that interest. On the other hand, I love Columbia and Mizzou and have a true passion for ER. I am a trauma junkie who loves the fast pace and coming to work everyday unsure of what will occur. With both schools I need to be in a position to take classes in order to try my MCAT, as well as have access to an FNP school, in case I try for my Doctorate of Nurse Practitioner.

    I am sorry this was so long and given in so many details. I know in a few years I will probably look back at all of this and laugh, but as a newbie in the nursing world it is very confusing and scary getting ready to go into the big world by myself for the first time. I am just not sure what I want, and just have some strange feeling I will be forever stuck at the area I choose. Any advice or words of the wise would be appreciated. Looking forward to hearing from you all.
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  4. 22 Comments so far...

  5. 0
    You're only stuck if you choose to be stuck. ICU is good experience, ER is also good experience. Any nursing job you choose will be stressful, eat up more of your time than you think, and challenge you all over the place. It could also inspire you to continue your education, maybe help provide you with ideas of what you want to do later. I have not seen statistics on the subject but I'd be willing to bet most nurses change jobs at some point in their career, and a lot of us change what type of unit we work in as well. The question is not what will your job choice do to you, but what will you do once you are there?
  6. 0
    Quote from buffscotty
    Hello my fellow nurses. It is great to finally find a message board and be able to discuss my new career with those much wiser than I. Let me start off by saying my story and what crossroads I am approaching.

    I am a student at Pittsburg State University in Kansas. I will graduate with my BSN in May and am counting down the moments. For years I had the plan to become a C.R.N.A., it was my goal and pretty much what I had my heart set on. Then, last summer, I worked as a patient care tech in an ER and loved it, as well as the doctors I worked with. About 4 weeks ago I decided I wanted to try (after school) to go back, take a few classes and go to Medical School to become a Dr. of Emergency Medicine. If this did not come to pass I wished to go for my DNP. But, thinking I was going to become a C.R.N.A. I had applied only to ICUís, but with ER really what I was striving for. I scurried and applied to an ER and was left with two choices

    Thinking I wanted ER and didnít have much interest in ICU, I interviewed at University Hospital in Columbia, MO for an ER position. Having already scheduled an interview at Mayo Clinic from before, I decided to go on it, just almost to see the facilities. I was absolutely blown away by Mayo (even with not wishing to do ICU as much as I had before) I was very impressed by Mayo and how the hospital and staff worked. So (I have not been offered either job, it will be a few weeks before I know in either) I am really in a tough decision. I am between ER (which I love to practice and get great satisfaction from) at Columbia and the ICU at Mayo (which I loved, but didnít know I did until I went to see it).

    Part of the appeal to me for Mayo is that Iíve grown up my whole life in Missouri (SW Missouri) and Minnesota is like a foreign land to me, so it is very interesting and new. I am single with no children and have an adventurous side, so Mayo takes me in that interest. On the other hand, I love Columbia and Mizzou and have a true passion for ER. I am a trauma junkie who loves the fast pace and coming to work everyday unsure of what will occur. With both schools I need to be in a position to take classes in order to try my MCAT, as well as have access to an FNP school, in case I try for my Doctorate of Nurse Practitioner.

    I am sorry this was so long and given in so many details. I know in a few years I will probably look back at all of this and laugh, but as a newbie in the nursing world it is very confusing and scary getting ready to go into the big world by myself for the first time. I am just not sure what I want, and just have some strange feeling I will be forever stuck at the area I choose. Any advice or words of the wise would be appreciated. Looking forward to hearing from you all.
    My :typing

    Mayo is the most impressive hospital I've ever seen! I spent a week there with my husband when he had some cardiac complications - I can't say enough about it - From the doctors & nurses to the entire staff of the hospital - my husband & I actually kept looking at each other because we thought we've never seen a more efficient, friendly, professional, therapeutic place in our lives!

    We're from the East Coast and made the trip on the recommendation of a researcher friend who does work for the Mayo Clinic - it's a cutting edge place to work and put on your resume.

    You'll get terrific skills in ICU and you can always go to ER....

    I'd pick ICU-Mayo!

    Good Luck!!!
  7. 0
    I don't believe that a new grad should be in the ER. You must have finely honed assessment skills which you will not have when you come out of school. ER is fast paced and there will be times when you don't even have a patient that can talk back and tell you what is wrong. Without experience it will be more difficult to properly assess and care for an ER patient - unless you are planning to work at a 20 bed rural hospital type ER that doesn't see much action. These days a nurse is expected to be able to pick up and run with little to no orientation. The ER is not the place to be learning about injury and diseases while dealing with life and death issues on a regular basis. You will find it much easier, and safer, to get some experience under your belt before going to the ER. You will also have an easier time of keeping your license if you have some idea of what a nurse does prior to going to such a fast paced environment where you must be able to work independently. You will not have the time to be asking another nurse about each and every case that comes in because you aren't familiar with caring for that problem.
  8. 0
    as an old nurse in tne twilight of my professional practice, i say go for the 'adventure'.

    go to the the BIG medical centers in some 'exotic' place, such as seattle, san francisco, or even minnesota.

    learn ALL you can! then, if you really want to you can always return to MO or KS.

    this is one of my regrets i had always wanted to go to some of these "far off" places -- but settled for 'safe'. i did practice in the Chicago area for > 10 years and LOVED it. but then moved back home where i've been for the past 20 years. i would go back in a heart beat. wish i had tried out seattle and san francisco too.
  9. 1
    Quote from RN1989
    I don't believe that a new grad should be in the ER. You must have finely honed assessment skills which you will not have when you come out of school. ER is fast paced and there will be times when you don't even have a patient that can talk back and tell you what is wrong. Without experience it will be more difficult to properly assess and care for an ER patient - unless you are planning to work at a 20 bed rural hospital type ER that doesn't see much action. These days a nurse is expected to be able to pick up and run with little to no orientation. The ER is not the place to be learning about injury and diseases while dealing with life and death issues on a regular basis. You will find it much easier, and safer, to get some experience under your belt before going to the ER. You will also have an easier time of keeping your license if you have some idea of what a nurse does prior to going to such a fast paced environment where you must be able to work independently. You will not have the time to be asking another nurse about each and every case that comes in because you aren't familiar with caring for that problem.

    I think you are being pessimistic to suggest that new grads should not be working in ER.

    As a new grad, you are fresh from school and knowledge about diseases. Working in ER can be rewarding in practicing all those skills you have mastered in nursing school.

    Many ER are taking new grads, giving them a much needed orienttion.

    For example, my sister started as an ER nurse with a 6 months orientation and she loves it. She is still working there 2 years now. I myself will graduate in May 08 and already applied at Mont Sinai Hospital and offered to work in ER in the new nurse residency program for 12 months orientation.
    miss rochelle likes this.
  10. 0
    Maybe you should research Mayo a little bit on the web. You'll
    see a whole different story. Mayo dosen't care about their patients. The
    nurses are unprofessional. My boyfriend went to their Scottsdale location
    in Phoenix. Not one of the nurses offered him any privacy while he was
    changing in his room. I complained to the state board of nursing about it.
    Believe me, I'm doing everything I can to get them fired! In december
    of last year a 5th year general surgery resident took a pic of a male
    patient's genitals was he was under anesthesia. Then show the pic to
    other people. He was canned. MAYO SUCKS!!! So does their nursing staff!
  11. 0
    Quote from Erlindathequeen
    Maybe you should research Mayo a little bit on the web. You'll
    see a whole different story. Mayo dosen't care about their patients. The
    nurses are unprofessional. My boyfriend went to their Scottsdale location
    in Phoenix. Not one of the nurses offered him any privacy while he was
    changing in his room. I complained to the state board of nursing about it.
    Believe me, I'm doing everything I can to get them fired! In december
    of last year a 5th year general surgery resident took a pic of a male
    patient's genitals was he was under anesthesia. Then show the pic to
    other people. He was canned. MAYO SUCKS!!! So does their nursing staff!
    You want the nurses to be fired for not offering your boyfriend privacy? That's harsh. Of course the nurses should have offered privacy, I'm not saying they were not wrong. To have them fired is a little bit much. Anyway, I doubt you will get them fired. You should focus your energy elsewhere.
  12. 0
    Well, good luck. It sounds like you are more interested in being called "doctor" than nurse. I hope you are able to see that DNP and MD are completely different types of practice. You need quite a bit of nursing expeience to be a NP of any kind. I think the ICU is a solid place to start if offered a comprehensive orientation and supervision.
    Good luck in deciding
  13. 0
    Quote from Erlindathequeen
    Maybe you should research Mayo a little bit on the web. You'll
    see a whole different story. Mayo dosen't care about their patients. The
    nurses are unprofessional. My boyfriend went to their Scottsdale location
    in Phoenix. Not one of the nurses offered him any privacy while he was
    changing in his room. I complained to the state board of nursing about it.
    Believe me, I'm doing everything I can to get them fired! In december
    of last year a 5th year general surgery resident took a pic of a male
    patient's genitals was he was under anesthesia. Then show the pic to
    other people. He was canned. MAYO SUCKS!!! So does their nursing staff!
    The fact he was fired speaks well for them also, in my opinion. On this site you will find more than one story of the 'good ole boy' mentality where Doctors are protected and coddled vs nurses. I always have to remind myself these days to shut the door and pull the curtain now it seems. It seems the longer you are in nursing, the more you get that' I've seen it all before' thing going on. Many of my patients have encouraged this forgetting privacy matters on my part along the years, by exhibiting no modesty what so ever. One gentleman I recall regularly would walk out in the hall in his birthday suit to get a fresh gown. The only thing that discouraged him to stop this practice was his unfortunate demise. (Not even putting one in his room!) It is a challenge over the years to remain in tune to your patients need regarding the simple courtesies like knocking on the door, pulling curtains,etc. Not that this is an excuse, mind you. I think a gentle reminder is effective as well. The good thing is that along with years of experience comes years of skills. If your boyfriends overall health outcome was positive that should count as well.


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