Midlife Career Change to Nursing - Advice, please - page 3

by mcgocara31

26,175 Views | 73 Comments

Hi all, I'm a 42-year-old lawyer who's seriously considering making a career change to the nursing field. (I've been an unhappy lawyer, in several different law positions, for 18 years now...). I am looking for a career that... Read More


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    Wow! So so cynical I am sure she appreciates the honesty, but not one person could say anything positive. I hope I never become this way.
    HomaShahabzadah and brian like this.
  2. 7
    Quote from gloryfied
    Don't Do It.

    ...plain and simple.
    save yourself.
    I agree. I am a career changer, did so in my thirties. It was a bad decision. I work a million times harder and make way less. My body hates me. I've become so unhealthy! Working 12 hour night shifts was necessary to get my foot in the door and it as aged me so much! Coming from a lawyer background you are probably analytical and appreciate logic. Ths will hinder you in healthcare. There is no logic and you are discouraged from questioning policies that make zero sense. Nursing no longer is centered on caring For patients, it is all about making money and working the staff to death to squeeze out every last drop.
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    @ toonsis sad to admit yup, but we are doing this person a favor. I wish someone would've scared me before I came into this, i wouldve been in a different situation in life. While nursing is not the worse, HMM well i guess i cant say that confidently, but hoonestly i think it's a pretty draining job. Whether you LOVVEEEE helping people, and CARRIINNG for the sick, and HEAALLLINGG. Thats all great, who doesnt want to help sick people get better. That's like doing good deeds every day you work, but the FIELD of nursing apparently has become more robotic than natural. You may love it in the beginning, but sooner or later, you'll find your self in a schizophrenic mode, just out of control who knows.

    Im just saying. It's something that is just.......something,no words
    Fiona59, netglow, and anotherone like this.
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    I graduated just last year, and my program being an entry-level master's geared towards career changers, there were quite a few older students, with a couple of lawyers too. It's true job search is brutal -- I live in California -- and possibly more difficult for older new grads. But eventually almost everyone I know from my cohort have a job now.

    If you're truly certain this is what you want to do, here's what I would suggest.

    Get stellar grades on your pre-reqs and get into a really well-known, reputable nursing school.

    Get to know your faculty. There might be research opportunities. They might connect you to managers and recruiters.

    Keep an open mind about what nursing is. It's not just bedside nursing. There are research, public health,... You will be exposed to various opportunities throughout school. Explore different nursing paths instead of making up your mind on a specialty early on.

    Try to get a healthcare job before or during school, such as CNA or even a volunteer. It may or may not pan out but it will still be an advantage over other applicants who never got exposed to such work.


    I hope this shines a ray of hope, since all other posts are so emphatically gloom.
    If I were so miserable in my current profession, I would gladly take the chance and go back to school. Jobs are hard to find, yes, but they're there. You just have to become one of the candidates who get hired.
    HomaShahabzadah, brian, Soon2BNurse3, and 1 other like this.
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    I agree! There are jobs out there. You just have to be willing to do what other won't do. That is how you get ahead in my opinion. Also, networking during clinical works wonders for potential job opportunities. I wonder if the original poster thought about the direction she may want to go? His/her own business, legal nurse, something that incorporates her current skills into nursing. It's hard to find your niche per say..
    HomaShahabzadah likes this.
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    Everything everyone said is true . competition for nyc jobs is in the 1000s . ny grads, ct, nj, pa, mass, ri etc. and all the other thousands in US that want to work and live in nyc and recent hospital closures. yes there are ltcs and dialysis and prisions but there is competition there too.Some can only find part time work. Many east coast big city grads had to relocate for jobs beginning in 2008 even with BSN. being a lawyer may be a plu us depending on who is looking at your resume. i like that i make wbout $25/hr, work 3 nights etc. those might be cons for you. The schedule may not be consistent. nights, days, holidays, weekends. I was able to relocate because I do not have other people I am responsible for but it was still rough. Oh and I am in my 20s and dont know if I can physically do this for 30more years ( a bit dramatic but it is not exactly a desk job) .
    Fiona59 and netglow like this.
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    Op, the geographic and schedule flexibility works well for the employer more than employee eap in a desirable market. Unless you mean rural montana night shift or part time in nebraska. do not expect any hrs you want where you want in boston, nyc, anywhere in california etc .
    netglow likes this.
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    Quote from toonsis
    Wow! So so cynical I am sure she appreciates the honesty, but not one person could say anything positive. I hope I never become this way.
    I don't know you've been a nurse for very long, or if you even are a nurse. But speaking as an experienced nurse, not one response here has been cynical. We are honestly answering a question that asked for honest answers. We do not have st*rs in our eyes. We are real nurses who understand the current real nursing environment.

    And yes, IF you are a nurse and IF you find a job, you will one day be realistic like us.
    Last edit by roser13 on Mar 23, '13
    forthebirds, chevyv, anotherone, and 2 others like this.
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    Quote from toonsis
    Wow! So so cynical I am sure she appreciates the honesty, but not one person could say anything positive. I hope I never become this way.
    You need to begin thinking in real vs positive/negative feelings as a nursing student. I think you are reading these posts with the impression that some sort of cynical teen angst is behind them. Positive/negative?! Nursing is not some sort of "idea" or "feeling", so positive or negative "feelings" don't enter into a real conversation about nursing.

    Why is it that so many have this unshakeable fairy tale notion of nursing? I wonder, what other profession draws so many with such off-base ideas? I feel that if you grab these people and shake them and make them listen that nursing is not folklore, they'll just break down and cry or something. I wonder if nursing attracts so many because they feel they will be able to use it to fill some sort of need, or fix something in their lives - totally not gonna do that for ya, peeps.
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    Quote from netglow
    You need to begin thinking in real vs positive/negative feelings as a nursing student. I think you are reading these posts with the impression that some sort of cynical teen angst is behind them. Positive/negative?! Nursing is not some sort of "idea" or "feeling", so positive or negative "feelings" don't enter into a real conversation about nursing.

    Why is it that so many have this unshakeable fairy tale notion of nursing? I wonder, what other profession draws so many with such off-base ideas? I feel that if you grab these people and shake them and make them listen that nursing is not folklore, they'll just break down and cry or something. I wonder if nursing attracts so many because they feel they will be able to use it to fill some sort of need, or fix something in their lives - totally not gonna do that for ya, peeps.
    Cannot say AMEN to this strongly enough. I have to think that the Florence Nightengale nursing angel paradigm persists to this day. Probably, only the professions of teaching and ministry carry the same sort of idealism.


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