Master's of Education + RN + experience = Nurse Educator?

  1. 0
    Hi! My name is Lauri and I am thinking of pursuing an R.N degree. I have 10 years teaching experience and am interested in becoming a Nurse Educator. I have read the job descriptions and requirements for a Nurse Educator and am a bit confused. Does anyone know if I pursue this R.N and add on several years experience - could I meet the requirements to be a Nurse Educator because I already have an extensive teaching background?
    Thank you for any responses!!
    ~Lauri
  2. Visit  lstpierre profile page

    About lstpierre

    Joined Nov '12; Posts: 5.

    12 Comments so far...

  3. Visit  PMFB-RN profile page
    0
    There is no such thing as a "RN degree". In any event only nursing degrees count in nursing. It would also be helpful to know what kind of educator you want to be. In house vs instructor at a college. For a college you will need a MSN + experience.
  4. Visit  lstpierre profile page
    0
    Thank you for correcting me...my intention is an A.A.S in Nursing leading to my RN. Also, the Assoc. Prof of Nursing at our local college said that there is a large weight put on prior teaching experience and credentials in the field when it comes to being a Nurse Educator. So, perhaps in this area, nursing degrees aren't the only thing that "count" in nursing??... That is exactly why I am reaching out to those of you who have experience. Thanks.
  5. Visit  PMFB-RN profile page
    0
    Quote from lstpierre
    Thank you for correcting me...my intention is an A.A.S in Nursing leading to my RN. Also, the Assoc. Prof of Nursing at our local college said that there is a large weight put on prior teaching experience and credentials in the field when it comes to being a Nurse Educator. So, perhaps in this area, nursing degrees aren't the only thing that "count" in nursing??... That is exactly why I am reaching out to those of you who have experience. Thanks.

    I am sure she is right when it comes to getting a job. However if you want to teach nursing at a college you will need an MSN at least. Quite possibly your previous teaching experience will be helpful for actually getting a teaching job , after you get your MSN.
    Last edit by TheCommuter on Nov 16, '12 : Reason: [/QUOTE] tags
  6. Visit  Rose_Queen profile page
    0
    Check your state's nurse practice act. I know mine defines the minimum requirements to be a nursing instructor (clinical only or clinical and lecture), so I'm sure other states do as well.
  7. Visit  PMFB-RN profile page
    0
    Wanted to add, if your goal is teaching you might consider a direct entry masters (DEMSN) program instead of an associates degree. It would take the same amount, or maybe less time to become and RN with the DEMSN vs the associates and that way after you have your experience you would be all set to teach.
    One word of caution though. Most of my nurse friends who thought they would like to teach never actually did it due to the huge loss in income it would mean for them vs staff nursing.
  8. Visit  goomer profile page
    1
    You need a Masters Degree in Nursing to become a Nurse Educator
    HouTx likes this.
  9. Visit  lstpierre profile page
    0
    Thanks a lot for all of your responses! Big help.
  10. Visit  Pets to People profile page
    0
    They can hire you as a nurse educator if you have your BSN and are working on your MSN. I have an instructor in my program who is a BSN, has RN experience and is working towards her MSN. She teaches class and does clinicals, just as the other instructors do.

    Previous educational experience is a plus, I'd imagine, but I'm sure they would prefer it would be college level educational experience. At what level is your previous experience?
  11. Visit  Multicollinearity profile page
    1
    Quote from Pets to People
    They can hire you as a nurse educator if you have your BSN and are working on your MSN. I have an instructor in my program who is a BSN, has RN experience and is working towards her MSN. She teaches class and does clinicals, just as the other instructors do.

    Previous educational experience is a plus, I'd imagine, but I'm sure they would prefer it would be college level educational experience. At what level is your previous experience?
    Requirements for nursing educators vary by state nurse practice act. For example, in my state you cannot teach in an RN program unless you have a master's degree in nursing.
    VickyRN likes this.
  12. Visit  Stephalump profile page
    0
    Quote from Pets to People
    They can hire you as a nurse educator if you have your BSN and are working on your MSN. I have an instructor in my program who is a BSN, has RN experience and is working towards her MSN. She teaches class and does clinicals, just as the other instructors do.

    Previous educational experience is a plus, I'd imagine, but I'm sure they would prefer it would be college level educational experience. At what level is your previous experience?
    It does vary. Legally in my state you must have a nursing degree above your students to teach in any capacity, so theoretically you could teach ADNs with a BSN. In realty though, even the ADN professors are MSN prepared with 25+ years of nursing experience.
  13. Visit  HouTx profile page
    0
    I'm a nurse educator (MSN, EdD). Seems like this thread is focusing on teaching in terms of academic settings. If so, PP's are absolutely correct - MSN is entry level. Some schools will hire BSNs as clinical educators but only if they are actively engaged in obtaining their MSN. Anyone who is serious about a career in academia needs to shoot for a doctorate. We are approaching a critical shortage of (academic) nursing faculty, so if this is your goal, there are funding opportunities to help you achieve your grad degree.

    However, workplace teaching is a different sort of animal. I know of many very successful Directors of Nursing/Clinical Education (for various types of hospitals, health care systems) who are RNs with MEd's instead of MSNs. As a general rule, Masters is required for any senior-level educator position, and larger health care organizations prefer educators with terminal degrees (doctorate). Salaries for workplace educators are generally quite a bit higher than our colleagues in academia - but we don't have the security of tenure, so I guess it's all good.
  14. Visit  lstpierre profile page
    0
    Dear HouTex,
    Thank you so much for your response. I know so little about all of this and it sounds like you know quite a bit. It sounds like workplace teaching is what would fit for me with my education. What does "workplace" teaching typically look like, if there is a typical look..


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