LPN to RN or BSN???


  1. I am currently working on my LPN. I am considering moving to Las Vegas when I graduate. Should I go from LPN to RN or BSN? Is there a big different between an RN and BSN??
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  2. 10 Comments

  3. by   Tweety
    Good luck in whatever you decide to do.

    Both BSN and ADN RNs take the same NCLEX and initially there isn't much difference after graduation. The BSN comes in handy later on down the line if you would like to get away from the bedside and do something like management, research, community health, etc.

    You can always do like me and go RN to BSN if you choose. Lots of options. It depends on what you personally want to do with your career, and what fits into your lifestyle. Good luck!
  4. by   EricJRN
    Welcome to Allnurses, Zippy!
  5. by   lilmeeper123
    It also depends on what state you are going to be working in. I am not sure about Nevada if you can work with an ADN - Several states now require BSN education for nurses. I started out with my ADN and went to BSN and now pursuing MSN. It also depends on what your goals are as to where you want to be. Good Luck.
  6. by   JentheRN05
    [BANANA]Welcome to ALLNURSES!![/BANANA]

    I would highly suggest going straight to BSN. It appears the profession is moving in that direction as almost a requirement.

    I only have my RN through a diploma school and I plan to go back as soon as I can afford the tuition. Which at this point seems like forever.
    Last edit by JentheRN05 on Oct 21, '06
  7. by   SmilingBluEyes
    Some ADN programs actually do not lack all that much for a BSN....mainly last year coursework, like Community Health nursing and Nursing statistics, etc. I know my ADN took 3 years to achieve, due to all the pre-req requirements, which literally matched exactly those for the BSN program 90 miles up the road. I literally only lacked the last year (senior) year coursework. I know a diploma nurse who spent a lot more time working on a BSN due to lacking a lot more so-called college work. In some cases these folks are asked to take freshman and sophormore-level coursework in the process of earning a BSN. It varies by program and university. Sometimes, ADN programs "mesh" REALLY well into BSN ones, in many universities. It would pay to check into how well your ADN would transfer to a BSN later on....

    Anyhow....

    I hope we can avoid a "who's better" thing in this thread.

    Personally, I am of the mind, if you can get your BSN right away, do so. If not, consider that if you do go to work fulltime, many hospitals will pay for all or part of your tuition when you do go for an ADN-BSN bridge program. There is definately more than one way to skin the proverbial cat. How you depend on it will depend on your finances and time frame you need to go to work.

    GOOD LUCK and welcome to allnurses.com!
    Last edit by SmilingBluEyes on Oct 20, '06
  8. by   EricJRN
    Moved to Nursing Career Advice Forum, the most appropriate place for discussion of educational paths in nursing.
  9. by   sdmama
    Quote from JentheRN05
    [banana]Welcome to ALLNURSES!![/banana]

    I would highly suggest going straight to BSN. It appears the profession is moving in that direction as almost a requirement.

    I only have my RN through a diploma school (which means I only need a few classes to get my BSN - unlike an ADN) and I plan to go back as soon as I can afford the tuition. Which at this point seems like forever.
    So true!
  10. by   JentheRN05
    I edited my message above - I re-read it and it could be interpreted wrong. But it is now quoted. So please all do not take it that I am trying to get a diploma vs ADN war going. I was just saying according to the classes I took (plus I did pre-reqs at another school) I will have fewer classes IN MY PARTICULAR CASE) than most ADNs. Absolutely NO attack meant in anyway on ADNs. There is no difference in my eyes. Hopefully that prevents any misunderstandings.
  11. by   Jules A
    The thing that I found is that it seems to be quicker in a way to do the LPN to ADN to BSN simply because many of your LPN classes will be counted toward your associates degree via bridge programs but I haven't found any BSN programs that will give you credit for them. I'm looking at 2 or 3 semesters to get my ADN but it would be the full two years for the BSN. Maybe I just haven't found the right school?
  12. by   2bNursevaldez2
    I have a question I'm curently a patien care technician working in the emergency room Which mean i have my phlebotomist , ekg, CNA , certification i also have my associate in health care adminitration ... And i took my intravenouce certification which mean i can put iv .. But im not allowed to ... Lol.. Im also a medical assistant and biller and coder .. Well the question is since i have all of my nursing pre - req i would like to know which would be a smarter route for me ... if going to lpn school then BSN or just going straigth in to RN - school then to BSN .... I was also wondering since i have my associate in health care would it shorten the lpn to bsn process ... Lpn is 11 moth RN 2 years Lpn to bsn 2 - 4 years RN to BSN 1.5 year But i would like to know if having an associate plus lpn plus Rn pre- re would only mean i have to go,for school for 11 moth plus 1.5 year to get my BSN. .? Is that posible ? Because i heard of people who has a BA in what ever concentration and obtain a master in nursing so lpn plus Ass degreed would be a short cut rigth ?

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