LPN then Rn or just straight to RN?

  1. Hi! I can apply to the nursing programs in March. At that point I will have all my prerequisites and electives completed, except for those that can only be take exclusively in the nursing program. Of course if I don't get accepted into the RN program on the first try and I do get accepted into the LPN program I won't have much say in how or what I do, but regardless of that, I am wondering what your opinions are on either starting out as an LPN, then bridging to the RN program or just going straight into the RN program? For me, time and economics are a huge factor in what may very well prevent me from doing the full 2 year program for the RN. And yet I feel if I don't , that I am not doing all I can do, or I am limiting myself (and I wonder to what extent?). I have also heard that the LPN program is extremely intensive..that they are more compressed for time (which kind of makes sense to me). Do you feel that an LPN income is something that would sustain two children until I was able to complete my RN? I am worried that problems could crop up in my marriage that would result in me not being able to finish the RN program..which is why time is a concern. Thank you.
    •  
  2. 6 Comments

  3. by   CHATSDALE
    you have to take a lot of things into consideration

    some lpn courses you take the whole course or nothing if you feel overwhelmed you can not drop one class and concentrate on the others but it is a way of getting your foot in the door and you will learn nursing from the ground up which will help you in rn schooling esp clinicals

    all things being equal i would opt for the rn course but take any door that opens good luck
  4. by   Jules A
    Hi,
    You sure do have a lot to consider. I wasn't 100% sure I would even like nursing so that is one of the reasons I decided to go the LPN route first. It seemed to me that I could get through 1 year of anything, lol. Fortunately I really love nursing. To tell the truth by the end of the year I was ready to move on to a different group and was quite glad that I was graduating. Now I will have a bit of backtracking to do the bridge program but as a licensed LPN you can work and maybe have your employer kick in some tutition assistance. Good luck with whatever you decide. Jules
  5. by   sameasalways
    I know what you mean by the (i can do anything for a year). I have thought that too. And then, I know if I did it, I would have it and no one could take it away regardless of what happens in my personal life ...does that make sense? I feel like I am not fulfilling my full desires though if I go that route. Yet I could always get the complete RN after. shoot I don't know!
  6. by   luv4nursing
    Quote from tinkerbellsmagicglit
    I know what you mean by the (i can do anything for a year). I have thought that too. And then, I know if I did it, I would have it and no one could take it away regardless of what happens in my personal life ...does that make sense? I feel like I am not fulfilling my full desires though if I go that route. Yet I could always get the complete RN after. shoot I don't know!
    Ive been an LPN for almost a year now and will start the bridge in January (God willing I get accepted!). Think of it this way. Its still the same amount of school regardless. The ADN is two years after pre reqs. LPN is one year. The bridge is another year (after pre reqs). What do u have to lose by getting your LPN first? It was the best decision I ever made because Im able to provide for myself financially after just one year of hard work and hard times financially.

    You can also work as an LPN and make a decent living while you finish so finances shouldnt keep u from finishing your RN. You can work home health which is laid back and not too stressful and u can study during your down time. And sort of like u said, I felt if anything got in my way, at least I would have my LPN under my belt versus nothing if I had to drop out of the ADN. Not to mention the fact Im already an LPN and if I hadnt went to LPN school Id still be on the waiting list for the ADN. Now I only have a year left to go versus starting from point A and going for two years. Good luck in whatever you do, but I dont regret getting my LPN for a minute :wink2:
  7. by   allegory
    I would definitely go for the RN if possible. It sounds like you need to do some more thinking on which route you will be able to take and talk it over with your significant other. Once you decide dont second guess yourself just be proud of what your doing and do your best. Either way your entering a great career and I wish you luck!
  8. by   casey12873
    I was kind of in the same predicament. I had two kids and a husband and finances sucked. I went to LPN school, graduated valedictorian of my class, have been working in LTC for a year and a half, and am very glad I did it that way. However, there have been many times I have felt frustrated with my limitations. I did take my IV therapy course--finished today, still have to get my sticks. I am looking into taking some bridge courses to get my ADN now, though. I have never regretted being an LPN first. I felt pressured when I first started LPN classes for time and money, now I don't feel pressured at all starting my RN classes. I can do it at my own pace and still work. It was a great solution!!

close