LPN then on to BSN or ADN?

  1. Hi there, I posted this question on another thread, but thought I would come here and see what current nurses thought to get advice. I am very much hoping to become an RN, still trying to get back into nursing school (I was once a BSN nursing student, but dropped out and kicking myself in hindsight). Because of my life circumstances, cost of tuition and living expenses while attending nursing school are the biggest factors for me, otherwise I'd really be trying for an Accerelerated BSN program. I have been shooting for a 2-year ADN program about 60 miles away from me and still need to take 75 hours of CNA classes and a NET test to get in, but I have recently been seriously thinking of instead applying to and attending a LPN school about 30 miles away as opposed to the ADN program 60 miles away, then right after completing that doing an online LPN to BSN program. I thought really perhaps an online program might be more convenient for a working mother, and might cut some of my time of reaching my ultimate goal of a BSN, and maybe less hassle? Does anyone have any thoughts on this idea? Both the LPN and ADN programs are part of two different state community colleges with probably the same tuition rates, the LPN program is like one less semester to complete than the ADN program. I ideally want to be an RN, but maybe bridging from LPN to BSN would be a better bet for me? I really don't know. Any advice would be greatly appreciated.
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  2. 7 Comments

  3. by   traumaRUs
    Hi there....I'm speaking of my own experiences. I was an LPN who upon graduation, went straight into an ADN program, worked for 10 years, then did a BSN, MSN and post-MSN certificate.

    If I could do it again, I would have gone straight to the BSN, either right from the beginning or after finishing the LPN. It makes it much easier. However, we all know how life creeps in on things.
  4. by   classicdame
    I too wish I had taken the shorter route, but what I did was ADN then BSN then MSN. My advice is to do as much as you reasonably can now so you can start reaping the benefits right away.
  5. by   cajjj
    Thanks for the replies, I worded my question wrong on this thread, so I posted another thread trying to be clear in my question of intent.
  6. by   Jules A
    What puzzles me is that there aren't many LPN to BSN programs so in my area the universities seem to give you more credit if you have your ADN. Maybe I'm mistaken but it seems to me that I won't get credit for any of my LPN nursing courses if I try to go right to my BSN. Anyone have any insight?
  7. by   cajjj
    What are they not going to give you credit for? I took a lot of prereq's when I was in college as a nursing major, and I hope those will be accepted if I were to do the LPN-BSN route. Have you looked into Indiana University's LPN-BSN online program?
  8. by   cajjj
    What are they not going to give you credit for? Wow, now that's something I need to look at too. I took a lot of gen ed prereq's when I was in college as a nursing major, and I hope those will be accepted if I were to do the LPN-BSN route. Have you looked into Indiana University's LPN-BSN online program?
  9. by   Jules A
    Quote from cajjj
    What are they not going to give you credit for? Wow, now that's something I need to look at too. I took a lot of gen ed prereq's when I was in college as a nursing major, and I hope those will be accepted if I were to do the LPN-BSN route. Have you looked into Indiana University's LPN-BSN online program?
    They will take all my gen-ed and pre-req stuff but its the 3 semester of LPN nursing classes that I wouldn't get any credit for. If I do an ADN bridge program I get credit for the full first year of the RN program and then when I go from ADN to BSN they are lighter on their pre-reqs for people that already have their RN. I'd scoot past a second math requirement, second humanities etc. I'm not comfortable with the online programs because my BON is balking at Excellsior and I really do feel I will benefit from what I perceive to be more clinical time than the online courses seem to offer.

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