LPN. or RN - page 4

by gapeacheykeen

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I recently relocated due to a nasty divorce, I have been trying to figure out which to do. LPN or BSN. I was waiting for the in-state tuition to kick in before I made a decision. (In Arkansas the wait is only 6 mo ) I really... Read More


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    I would go straight for your BSN and work as a tech while you're in school. It seems that AK has a lot of weird rules, or maybe it's just the schools in your area. RNs make on average $25,000/yr more than LPNs. As many have pointed out, ADNs are being phased out.
  2. 0
    Quote from gapeacheykeen
    Well first step is CNA, its required to be certified before admittance to the BSN program. Gotta have a job to go to school, so this part is a win-win. In all of the ADN programs being an LPN is a requirement. You may have missed the small print the websites for the colleges, I have poured over several websites. Once admitted to a Bsn program I can apply for student nursing jobs, the only thing I wonder is how much they pay. Hopefully more than cna pay. I know each state has different programs, some make sense and others seem odd. At least the LPN program really does build onto the ADN program....so it can be considered a win in the programs.
    I really don't know why ANY BSN program would require an applicant to become an LPN first unless that program was specifically a bridge-type program wherein LPNs/LVNs can earn their RN (ADN) and sit for the NCLEX within a year or so. These programs are very popular but are also the first to get cut when a state has fiscal trouble. This is not required in the five states I'm familiar with. Not to mention it simply doesn't make sense.

    I know in Nevada and CA one can become a NAP (or Nurse Apprentice) and the pay is about what a CNA would make in either state BUT you usually have to work around the chosen hospital's schedule rather than a school's schedule. It might be easier to simply get the CNA certification and then work per diem for a staffing company. The one benefit of being a NAP is that you most likely would have a job lined up upon graduation.
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    The BSN program requires CNA certification....the ADN program requires LPN certification. So my first baby step is paying out of pocket to get the CNA class and become certified. Next baby step is getting 2nd shift job so that I can take classes only offered in the day. Once I get those then I will be better prepared to decide which route to take.
  4. 0
    Quote from gapeacheykeen
    Well first step is CNA, its required to be certified before admittance to the BSN program. Gotta have a job to go to school, so this part is a win-win. In all of the ADN programs being an LPN is a requirement. You may have missed the small print the websites for the colleges, I have poured over several websites. Once admitted to a Bsn program I can apply for student nursing jobs, the only thing I wonder is how much they pay. Hopefully more than cna pay. I know each state has different programs, some make sense and others seem odd. At least the LPN program really does build onto the ADN program....so it can be considered a win in the programs.
    I found this on Arkansas http://www.bestnursingdegree.com/programs/lpn-to-rn/arkansas/

    I
    t seems like a slightly sketchy site based on the name but it's actually pretty up to date on everything and I've used it to search for online NP programs.

    I can't recommend enough to get a BSN - in the least, you'll find it opens doors in competitive market areas.

    Also, be careful how much you work while in school - everyone needs to make ends meet but with full time night/evening shift you can burn out and it can affect academic performance very quickly if you don't take care of your well-being.

    Good luck!
  5. 0
    I am getting my BSN, RN. I would suggest if you are considering either your Licensed Practical Nurse or Bachelors in Science and Nursing to go for your BSN. An LPN is consistant with getting a Nursing license but you are still restricted as to what you can do as a Nurse and you need to be under the supervision of a Registered Nurse. Instead of going for your LPN I would suggest going for your RN, it is only two years and the pay is rather significant. Then from there I would suggest your BSN because they get paid, depending on the site, more than a RN. Or, you can get your LPN/LVN and bridge to an RN program. Something you need to remember is that LPN/LVN's are starting to be outsourced and laid off from hospitals because they are really not being used as much as they used to be. Even a great deal of nurses who have their RN are being pushed to get their BSN's.
    I am extremely happy with the path I have chosen, to get my BSN because job opportunities will be endless and I will be more stable financially. It will also be easier to go back to school and get my MSN eventually. When I spoke to the head of recuitment at a hospital that I have interned at and told her my goal to get my BSN she specifically said she would hire someone like me over a nurse out of an ADN/ASN program.
    Best of luck
  6. 4
    The claim that "very few" ADNs are getting hired in hospitals anymore is simply false in many areas of the country. It may be true in the northeast and in California, but it is not true at all in many midwest regions and the south. I got hired with an ADN at a teaching hospital - one that is even in the process of pursuing magnet status. My orientation group has about half to two-thirds ADNs. What many hospitals are looking for is that you really applied yourself academically (GPA) and that you went above and beyond in seeking out learning opportunities & experience (working as a hospital tech during school, seeking out shadowing opportunities on your own, volunteering, etc.) In my region, many hospitals will hire an ADN who has a 3.8-4.0 GPA over a BSN with a lower GPA. I definitely know that I would if I was a hiring manager (and I will if I become one).

    Many hospitals strongly encourage their ADN nurses to continue with an ADN-BSN bridge program, but they are not entirely shutting out ADNs. It is interesting that the few hospitals in my area that have switched to BSN-only are NOT the highest ranked hospitals, they are not teaching institutions, they often have bad reputations with the public and among healthcare professionals, and they seem to have nothing else to distinguish themselves from their competition (hence their attempt to create a superificial distinction by only hiring BSNs). I also seem to run into an abnormally large number of experienced nurses who have left these hospitals because of abusive management, poor teamwork among nurses, and workplace hostility. I wouldn't trade my job to get into one of these places even if they offered me a sign-on bonus worth 100% of my salary!

    All I'm saying is that it is very important for you to do your homework ahead of time FOR YOUR REGION since hiring trends are highly variable from one region to another. Do plan to pursue your BSN - but think about the timing and whether it is feasible to get hired first as an ADN and then let your hospital pay your BSN bridge program tuition for you. If you factor in all the financial variables (ADN versus BSN tuition cost, 2 extra years of earning RN salary rather than still being unlicensed during your junior & senior years in a traditional 4-year BSN program, being able to capitalize on a hospital paying your BSN bridge tuition), you stand to come out ahead by well over $100k if you pursue your ADN first.
    Last edit by AJPV on Feb 5, '12
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    Thanks. I didn't think about the hospitals actually helping on the tuition.
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    Florida here...there's a difference in pay (LPN/RN ADN) but it's nothing to brag about.
    Some of us "older folk" can't do the degree in one fell swoop. We need to do it in steps because we have families that we need to support and time constraints with other obligations. You may need to go the long way: LPN->ADN->BSN
    Do whatever it is you need to do...JUST GET THERE! )
  9. 0
    Just an FYI: not all hospitals pay for you to go back to school for the BSN.
  10. 0
    Just an FYI: not all hospitals pay for you to go back to school for the BSN.


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