LPN or RN? need advice

  1. Im a new grad LPN, continuing to go to school. I have been going to school part time for 3 years straight without a break (summers included). In my current situation I cannot work as an LPN, I have to continue school now (for four consecutive semesters without a break) or wait a couple years to get back in the program. Im 26 and want to get it overwith but I am losing my mind!!! I'm a single parent and afraid if I start to work full time I will have a difficult time going back to school. On the other hand I have never worked as a CNA, as many people do before deciding to go to nursing school, I just went to nursing school. So I don't know if it its important to get a practical nursing position first or just continue straight through. I know a lot of people just go straight to their RN, but thier school may not offer any other option, and I have a license that I can't use, should I take advantage of it and give myself a break?

    Please give advice!!!


    Is the pay really that much different??
    Last edit by MelodyRNurse on Feb 20, '07
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  2. 10 Comments

  3. by   CHATSDALE
    if it is humanly possible go for the gold..the pay is better the chance for advancement for an lpn is absolutely nothing

    too many nurses have promised themselves that they were going back to school but family situation, finances just plain prograstination makes it impossible
  4. by   sissyboo
    I say try if at all possible. You've made it this far...Good Luck umpiron:
  5. by   MelodyRNurse
    Thankyou and I feel for anyone who has been in a similar situaltion. Actually I feel for everyone who has been through nursing school, especially full-time and/or with kids.
    I know I haven't seen anything yet. I just hope it gets better. Thanks again for your opinions!!
  6. by   DebbieRN45
    I was an LPN for 10 years and got my RN two years ago in a bridge program. I worked full time (nights), raised my son as a single parent, and went to school to get my prerequisites. It was a battle, but I don't regret it a bit. I doubled my wages when I passed boards, and some facilities give you 1 year of RN for every 2 years of LPN work history. If you can do it, by all means go for it!!
  7. by   love2shop
    In an ideal world it would be good to be a cna first. But trainning is trainning. Once you get use to any job you can do it. Since you have
    had such a hard schedule so far I would say keep going. I stopped school for 1 year to work on getting myself comfortable as a LPN. This one year has lasted 6! I don't know when I will go back to finish my RN.
  8. by   pagandeva2000
    If you are a new graduate LPN and are actually in an RN program, I would consider taking the NCLEX-PN but still continue your RN course. I have friends that dropped the RN course for several reasons, and discovered that they had a very hard time reapplying again. In fact, I hear that some schools are insulted when people drop and then reapply (don't know how true that is, but I have a friend that is insisting that this is happening to her). Since being an RN is your goal, and you are currently in a program, I would try to stick it out unless there is a serious illness in the family. If you do decide to take the NCLEX-PN, you can work on the side in a field closer to what you are aiming for and can make some decent money compared to being a CNA. Best wishes and try to continue!
  9. by   TheCommuter
    Be advised that many LPN-to-RN bridge programs require a minimum of 1 year of LPN work experience before they'll consider admitting you.

    I work full-time on the weekends while attending school full-time during the week. I work 16 hours on Saturdays and 16 hours on Sundays, then have Monday through Friday off to attend school at my local community college full-time for 17 credit hours this semester. My workplace pays me for a 40 hour work week under the Baylor Plan, and I am proud to say I received a 4.0 grade point average last semester.

    If any employers in your area offer full-time weekends, it might be worth looking into. You can attend school full-time for the RN program during the week and earn a decent livelihood as an LPN every weekend. Good luck!
  10. by   MelodyRNurse
    I just passed the NCLEX-PN last month, I am still looking for a job, Unfortunately I just don't have time for the training and I have specific hours that I can work, so no one wants me. I have came to the conclusion that I may have to finish school working at my current non-nursing related position which pays half as much as facilities in my area offer for PNs.

    I have considered that it is difficult to get back into the program. It would probably take me about four years before I would graduate. So I'm pushing myself to continue, but I am dissapointed because I can't work at a nursing job because I'm honestly not sure if I really want to be an RN at this time. I think working as a PN would really give me some insight but I can't have both.

    Anyway I'm just babbling on. Thankyou all for your thoughts.
  11. by   mellyt
    As someone that was in the position you are in I just want to say to have gotten this far is a large step. I am a single mom and just went blindly into nursing school with no healthcare knowledge before hand. I went straight through and I remember thinking after lpn school "Am I sure I need to be an RN." Well I made it through and can say yes, you will find RN school a lil more stressful but overall if you made it through lpn school RN will fly by. DONT GIVE UP! It sounds like you have been very determined to have gotten this far and that is exactly what makes a great nurse. If you need to work or want to work as an LPN then maybe check out Nursing Homes in your area because they utilize lpn's more than the hospital setting does. GOOD LUCK!!!!!
  12. by   MelodyRNurse
    Quote from mellyt
    As someone that was in the position you are in I just want to say to have gotten this far is a large step. I am a single mom and just went blindly into nursing school with no healthcare knowledge before hand. I went straight through and I remember thinking after lpn school "Am I sure I need to be an RN." Well I made it through and can say yes, you will find RN school a lil more stressful but overall if you made it through lpn school RN will fly by. DONT GIVE UP! It sounds like you have been very determined to have gotten this far and that is exactly what makes a great nurse. If you need to work or want to work as an LPN then maybe check out Nursing Homes in your area because they utilize lpn's more than the hospital setting does. GOOD LUCK!!!!!
    Thankyou!!!

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