Looking to negotiate a position

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    there's a position that has been posted, on the unit i work per diem on. it's a full time postion, 8 hrs (it's a cns/educator type position). many have said they are not interested in the position because it is 8 hrs/5 days (the staff works 12 hrs). the only problem is, it is impossible for me to work ft. it's not the 8hrs, it's the 5 days a week that i cannot do. would it be too presumtuous of me to ask if they would consider a pt position (3 days a week)? i don't want to formally apply before finding out if they would consider it. honestly, i don't think it will be too easy to fill the position, because of the 8 hr thing (and it's nights too ). i don't want to be the one to tell them that, but they'll soon realize when few people apply. it seems that there are few who are qualified (i would say i am), or interested. i just don't want to be too pushy. i thought maybe a quick phone call would do it, before i started stressing over it. but i don't want to tell them what they should do. any thoughts???
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    Having been on the "other side," of the situation, trying to hiring people ... I don't think there is anything wrong with a polite phone call asking if they would consider an application from someone who wanted to work part time. Just be sure you are "asking politely" and not "telling them what to do." There is a big difference.

    Another possibility is to officially apply -- but include a good cover letter saying that you would prefer the position be part time -- and would be interested in sharing the postion should another person also be interested in the position on a part time basis. Sometimes, people might consider changing 1 full time postion into 2 part time ones. Again, the trick is to let them know what you are interested in, but respecting their right to decide whether or not to hold out for a single person who wants to work full time.

    Good luck,
    llg
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    Thanks. Good advice.
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    at this point the position's requirements and hours are what "they" think they need. if you bring up a change right off the bat, you will ruin your chances of getting the job anyway. get the offer first. remember, they are interviewing you, not the other way around. after you get the offer, or pretty darn close to it, you can make a suggestion about the part-time and have a chance to sell them on the idea. without getting the offer first, you won't have that chance. they may agree and can see your thinking ability at the same time. have a plan worked out that will provide a win-win situation for all involved. just my opinion but i always used to tell people in interview seminars (i taught them) that when you are looking to change jobs, your immediate task is to get the offer. make them want to make these "small changes" for you. if you sell them on you first, the rest is a cakewalk.
    just my opinion.
    Quote from bonemarrowrn
    there's a position that has been posted, on the unit i work per diem on. it's a full time postion, 8 hrs (it's a cns/educator type position). many have said they are not interested in the position because it is 8 hrs/5 days (the staff works 12 hrs). the only problem is, it is impossible for me to work ft. it's not the 8hrs, it's the 5 days a week that i cannot do. would it be too presumtuous of me to ask if they would consider a pt position (3 days a week)? i don't want to formally apply before finding out if they would consider it. honestly, i don't think it will be too easy to fill the position, because of the 8 hr thing (and it's nights too ). i don't want to be the one to tell them that, but they'll soon realize when few people apply. it seems that there are few who are qualified (i would say i am), or interested. i just don't want to be too pushy. i thought maybe a quick phone call would do it, before i started stressing over it. but i don't want to tell them what they should do. any thoughts???
  7. 0
    Quote from bonnie nurse
    at this point the position's requirements and hours are what "they" think they need. if you bring up a change right off the bat, you will ruin your chances of getting the job anyway. get the offer first. remember, they are interviewing you, not the other way around. after you get the offer, or pretty darn close to it, you can make a suggestion about the part-time and have a chance to sell them on the idea. without getting the offer first, you won't have that chance. they may agree and can see your thinking ability at the same time. have a plan worked out that will provide a win-win situation for all involved. just my opinion but i always used to tell people in interview seminars (i taught them) that when you are looking to change jobs, your immediate task is to get the offer. make them want to make these "small changes" for you. if you sell them on you first, the rest is a cakewalk.
    just my opinion.
    i see your point, but at the same time, i cannot take the job if it is full time. i don't want to 'waste their time' if they have no intentions on negotiating a ft position to pt. i'm not good at lying (or hiding the truth, that is). so i feel like if i went in there, and made no mention of my availability, it would be wrong (i don't think i could do it anyway).

    ironically, i just came back from an open house (different facility than this potential job). i went in with what i thought was a very flexible attitude, as i am looking for something new (a new specialty, that is). i am flexible as far as shift, and can do more than my share of required weekends. they had nothing in a part time position. i didn't want to sound like i would take anything, as long as it was pt, but i just can't consider ft at this point. i wasn't about to go through the motions and tour a unit that only had ft positions, so my stay there was rather short. they took my resume and application, and said they will call me if something pt came up. i narrowed it down to 2 areas i would consider working in. i'm not a new grad, and have a lot of experience, so i felt rather disappointed that they would negotiate any position.

    so do you suggest i apply for the position, interview, and then if offered, attempt to negotiate? or can i make metion of it at the interview (if i get one?)

    i appreciate your honesty, despite the fact that it is not what i wanted to hear.
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    As someone who hires people, I get very angry if someone deceives me during the interview/hiring process. That type of behavior leads me to believe that the person is not trustworthy and is trying to manipulate me. I would much rather have the applicant say something like, "I am very interested in the position, but I am not sure that the hours required are right for me. Is there a little room for negotiation on that aspect of the job?" ... and then be prepared to be flexible.

    Once a person has misled me ... I write them off my list completely. So do most of my friends in management positions.

    Now, if you don't know the people at all and are applying for a position from the outside ... then it is OK to ask for information, express some interest, etc. without divulging your needs for a PT position. However, if it gets to the point of a an actual serious interview, then I would be up-front with them about your need for PT hours.

    llg
  9. 0
    Quote from Bonnie Nurse
    Remember, they are interviewing YOU, not the other way around.
    Not true! I always "interview" the other side to see if the position is a good fit for me as well. I often don't leave the interview until I ask at least 5-6 questions about the position, etc.

    I would simply ask if they would consider a PT person, otherwise, why waste both yours and their time by interviewing when they may really have a reason why they need one full timer?


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