Leaving my job while still in orientation

  1. Hi everyone,

    I need some advice. I started my job June 12th and I am currently still in orientation. I drive an hour to work every day and the drive plus working 12 hour shifts is very taxing. I have gotten a job offer at another place I plan on accepting and I am wanting to leave. What is the right way to go about leaving? I know they are not going to want me to work out a notice, because I am still with a preceptor and I am not on the schedule yet. I live an hour away and I was wondering if a phone call or email would be okay to let my nurse manager know I am leaving. I haven't had a very good experience at the facility and I have discovered that it is not for me. Please give me some input on the correct way to resign from my job. Thank you!
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  2. 27 Comments

  3. by   AnnieOaklyRN
    Hi,

    I would definitely talk to the nurse manager in person on your next shift and show up, don't just call or email. You don't want to burn bridges!

    Good luck

    Annie
  4. by   caliotter3
    Write a letter of resignation and send it by snail mail to HR. Send a copy by email to HR and a copy to your manager. Call and discuss this on the phone with your manager, letting her know that the letters will be forthcoming. Do it with proper notice and allow the employer to tell you not to return, otherwise, without the notice, you will probably be listed as "Not eligible for rehire" and you want to avoid that. Go to work on your next shift until the employer actually tells you that you don't have to return.
  5. by   KourtneiNurse
    Not sure where you live, but I've discovered nursing world is a small world. I remember I helped a coworker with her demanding and difficult patient when I was a new nurse at the hospital. I hated the job and orientation was stressful and difficult. Months later I left the job and was working at a new facility. During the open house this lady came up to me smiling as if she new me. She was the patient I helped my coworker with. Turned out she was a good child-hood friend of the CEO of the new company I worked for! Even though I had the job already, she could have impacted my reputation as an employee there.

    As a hiring manager now, I talk to other managers and nurses from all types of companies (hospital, home health, universities, drug reps, etc) to collaborate and network and if they were to tell me a nurse resigned in any way other than face to face as a professional, I'd think twice about considering that nurse for a job. Its courteous, professional, and mature to give proper notice in writing and in a brief discussion and always give a minimum of 2 weeks notice unless they offer you immediate resignation. Like AnnieOakly said, don't burn bridges!
  6. by   abm2013
    Thank you for the feedback. Should I speak to my nurse manager before sending the letter of resignation? I don't want to blindside her either way. I'm just new to this and I don't want to be unprofessional about it.
  7. by   caliotter3
    I think you should speak to her first.
  8. by   Boomer MS, RN
    Quote from abm2013
    Thank you for the feedback. Should I speak to my nurse manager before sending the letter of resignation? I don't want to blindside her either way. I'm just new to this and I don't want to be unprofessional about it.
    Yes, make an appointment to speak with her in person as soon as possible. You can give her your formal letter of resignation at that time, as well as drop a copy by the HR department. And keep a copy for yourself. It is professional and courteous to inform her in this way. Even if you haven't had a good experience at the facility, it is wise to maintain a cordial relationship with this manager. Since you're still on orientation, the manager may tell you not to return to work after your meeting. She may ask you what did not work for you, so be prepared. And remember to be gracious about giving you the opportunity for the job, even if it did not work out. Good luck.
  9. by   Workitinurfava
    Talk to the manager and then go to HR. Either way get out of there before you go past you orientation period.
  10. by   TriciaJ
    Definitely face-to-face with the manager before HR gets your written notice. Tell her the situation plus the commute are unsustainable for you and you don't want your coworkers to put any more time and energy into your orientation now that you've realized you can't stay.

    Emphasize how much you respect and appreciate everyone and that you had to do a lot of soul-searching before giving up such a great opportunity. If she seems a bit miffed, at least it's a sign that she doesn't want to lose you. Hopefully, she also appreciates your honesty and consideration for others. Good luck!
  11. by   Cinderella8825
    I would write the letter, and you can find drafts online, and bring it with you to the meeting, as well as a copy of it for her to sign and date when she received it for your copy. Be nice and make sure you simply stick with you didn't realize how taxing the travel time would be after a 12 hour shift. I would not delve into anything else. You can also bring a copy for HR. Good luck!
  12. by   Nurse Beth
    Quote from KourtneiNurse
    Not sure where you live, but I've discovered nursing world is a small world. I remember I helped a coworker with her demanding and difficult patient when I was a new nurse at the hospital. I hated the job and orientation was stressful and difficult. Months later I left the job and was working at a new facility. During the open house this lady came up to me smiling as if she new me. She was the patient I helped my coworker with. Turned out she was a good child-hood friend of the CEO of the new company I worked for! Even though I had the job already, she could have impacted my reputation as an employee there.

    As a hiring manager now, I talk to other managers and nurses from all types of companies (hospital, home health, universities, drug reps, etc) to collaborate and network and if they were to tell me a nurse resigned in any way other than face to face as a professional, I'd think twice about considering that nurse for a job. Its courteous, professional, and mature to give proper notice in writing and in a brief discussion and always give a minimum of 2 weeks notice unless they offer you immediate resignation. Like AnnieOakly said, don't burn bridges!
    I so agree that you must do everything the above posters said to mitigate any damage to your professional reputation.

    You will probably be dismissed at the time you give notice, so be sure your other job is lined up. Best wishes.
  13. by   meanmaryjean
    Quote from Nurse Beth
    I so agree that you must do everything the above posters said to mitigate any damage to your professional reputation.

    You will probably be dismissed at the time you give notice, so be sure your other job is lined up. Best wishes.
    ^^ This ^^ Be prepared to be shown the door immediately. Be sure you are prepared to clean out locker, turn in badge, etc.
  14. by   Ben_Dover
    Courtesy is always a given...share it!

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