Just plain need advice!

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    :sighk, here goes. In 2009 I got my bachelors degree from a very expensive school. Drowning in loans and not being able to find a decent job I bounced around lost and poor., I thought about going into nursing. I love working with people and worked many jobs with people who have disabilities and mental illness so I thought it would be a good fit.
    I started my first semester of school to become an RN last year. I began second guessing myself and was really getting discouraged by all the unhappy nurses I saw. I did well my first semester but due to the fact that I was drowning in debt and a)didn't want to take out even more loans and b) I was getting nervous about the responsibilities I'd face, I left school.
    Fast forward to now- I work in a hospital as an admin assistant. As I sit there doing mind numbing jobs, I think of how envious I am of the nurses. I still cannot afford the RN program but I was told by the lpn program advisor that I might be able to skip a semester of the lpn program since I did one semester of rn program already. This would be much cheaper and faster. Then I could get my feet wet and eventually become an Rn down the road if I so choose.
    Here is where I need an opinion. Is it even worth it to become an lpn in ny state these days? I make $14.68 as an admin assistant. Will I be able to even make more than that as an lpn? Is it stupid or weird to get an lpn when I have a bachelors degree (in communications). Is an lpn responsibility a lot different than an rn? I'm so lost. I love helping people. When I say I'm not good at anything my boyfriend always says I'd make a great nurse. I'm caring, calm, and don't get grossed out easily lol. I am in so much debt from student loans that I am trying to dig my way out of. Should I stay where I am or go for the lpn program? Any insight is greatly appreciated.
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  3. 8 Comments so far...

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    A lot of places aren't hiring LPNs, so be very, very careful about that. Also, "might be able to skip my first semester" for LPN school isn't reliable. Call the board of nursing in your state and ask about that.

    Do not take on more debt for any reason; the imagined joys of being a nurse will be tempered considerably by seeing a large hunk of your paycheck go away every month to debt service. Also, contrary to public opinion, there is no nursing shortage and many new RN grads wait many months or even years before being hired for their first jobs...and their loans are due every month anyway.

    If you have a bachelor's already, consider a bachelor's-in-anything-to-BSN program if you can afford the new debt and take the time. Faster, and BSN will put you way ahead of LPNs and ASN/ADNs for hiring.
    loriangel14 likes this.
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    I would go for the RN or LPN. If you need to work, I would consider part-time. Does you hospital have a program where they pay for part of the education. Also, what type of hospital do you work for? Some take part in the nursing loan forgiveness program for federal loans.
    Atlhonee likes this.
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    Well, you may end up working in a nursing home or on a psych floor. I would also see if they have tuition reimbursement. My nursing school can "tweak" the program so you would be part-time and go longer than other students if have a yearly reimbursement limit.

    As for making more than that, I make more than the LPNs do as a paramedic in an ER. I make 16.50 plus an extra dollar for night shift and another .45 cents when I work weekends per hour. So like today, I make 17.50. The LPNs start out at about 14 to 16 in my hospital but they only work in the psych floors and the clinics. The clinics like them because they can provide patient education in my state which is different from most states.
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    moved to nursing career advice for best response
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    Thanks for the help. I actually would like to work in mental health if I have the choice! I think I am going to go for it..
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    Have you looked at becoming a psych tech? I believe that (in most states) the entry level is via certificate or Associate degree.
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    Are you considering going to BOCES? Where I was at you had to complete the 1st YEAR of nursing to skip one semester of LPN at BOCES. After I graduated, I worked in a specialty office in a more rural area and made $14 an hour as a LPN.
    If you do get your LPN, you may still have to do the entire RN program or challenge a semester or two (which was hard where I was located in upstate NY). Also, my SUNY school made you complete the program within 4 years or you had to start over so the semester you have may not count towards RN unless you go back soon. If you are going to go back really soon, you may want to just go back for RN which would end up saving you money vs paying for LPN AND RN.
  11. 0
    Quote from GrnTea
    A lot of places aren't hiring LPNs, so be very, very careful about that. Also, "might be able to skip my first semester" for LPN school isn't reliable. Call the board of nursing in your state and ask about that.

    Do not take on more debt for any reason; the imagined joys of being a nurse will be tempered considerably by seeing a large hunk of your paycheck go away every month to debt service. Also, contrary to public opinion, there is no nursing shortage and many new RN grads wait many months or even years before being hired for their first jobs...and their loans are due every month anyway.

    If you have a bachelor's already, consider a bachelor's-in-anything-to-BSN program if you can afford the new debt and take the time. Faster, and BSN will put you way ahead of LPNs and ASN/ADNs for hiring.
    This is sound advice.


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