Job Proposal

  1. Hi,
    I was wondering how does someone go about developing and submitting a job proposal? What is the proper format and etiquette surrounding this?

    In my current organization, I've recognized a need for a position that doesn't exist. I'm on very good terms with the Director of the area this would impact. I would like to submit a job proposal, as well as recommend myself for such a position.

    I'm just not sure
    1. If this is professionally proper
    2. How do go about doing it properly and professionally

    Any help/suggestions? Thanks!
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  2. 27 Comments

  3. by   llg
    If you already have a good relationship with the Director, why don't you just make an appointment with her and ask her for advice on how to procede? Tell her about your idea and then ask her how she would want you to explore the possibilities further.

    She might want you to research the topic further, do a literature review, develop a possible job description, etc. On the other hand, she may say, "I've already tried to create such a position and have been turned down by my Vice President twice." She might also say something like, "That sounds intriguing. Let me run that idea past a few people and then I'll get back to you."

    I would meet with the Director and get an initial reaction from her and learn a little about the process of job creation in your institution before you invest a whole lot of time with a fancy written proposal that might not be needed.

    I got my current job (which was created with me in mind) by talking with the Vice President for nursing several times, doing some special projects, and otherwise demonstrating the usefulness of having someone do the things I was interested in doing full time. Sometimes, the most convincing "argument" is to demonstrate the usefulness of something. That may be more effective than a written proposal. In your conversation with the Director, be prepared to do a little of what you are proposing to do in order to show the benefit of it.

    Good luck,
    llg
  4. by   Q.
    I never would have thought about that, llg, but I did just that. We'll be meeting in the near future.

    It's promising to here you got your current job in almost the same fashion. I've heard it's those jobs where people are the happiest.
  5. by   llg
    Quote from Q.
    I never would have thought about that, llg, but I did just that. We'll be meeting in the near future.

    It's promising to here you got your current job in almost the same fashion. I've heard it's those jobs where people are the happiest.
    Throughout my career I had run into people with "non-standard" jobs and I always wondered about how they got them. Whenever I had the opportunity, I would ask them about their career paths. One of the things I learned was that it usually depends on being in the right place at the right time.

    So ... when I was in a career crisis about 7.5 years ago, I started resolving the crisis by putting myself in a good environment. I accepted a job that some people would consider being a "step backward," but a job that was in a good hospital working with good people. I had recently gotten my PhD and went back to being a CNS in a role exactly like the one I had before returning to school. Some people would have thought, "All that money and 5 more years of grad school for a PhD and I am going to back to the same type of job! No way!"

    But I had learned that working in a good place with good people was a good thing and I needed a job. Over the next couple of years, I did the best I could with the job and sought ways to demonstrate that I could do more for the hospital with my advanced education and experience than the typical CNS could do. I established very positive relationships with the Vice President for Nursing and other nursing leaders within the system. I volunteered for a few special projects that interested me. So ... when the opportunity arose for the VP for Nursing to create a new position or two to help her manage the nursing shortage, she thought of me and some of the special projects I had done. I had put myself in the right place and had worked hard to establish myself as a good person to have around.

    Some people may call it luck ... but I believe that luck comes with being prepared. It's often a product of having done all the groundwork so that you can take full advantage of any opportunities that come along.

    So ... I guess what I am saying is, that if your upcoming meeting with the Director doesn't go exactly as you hope, don't jump to the conclusion that it won't pay off in the long run. You might plant a seed in her mind that takes a little while to take root.

    Good luck ... and let me know how it goes.

    llg
  6. by   Q.
    Well...
    I had emailed the Director to give her a brief oversight of what I would envision for such a position, also included the thought that perhaps this is already done and I just am not aware of it or perhaps she's already thought of it and can't move it forward (as you've suggested earlier).

    She responded to my email and wants to set up a meeting. She said she'd love to discuss the current structure and plans for the future.

    Sounds promising, no?
  7. by   llg
    Quote from Q.
    Well...
    I had emailed the Director to give her a brief oversight of what I would envision for such a position, also included the thought that perhaps this is already done and I just am not aware of it or perhaps she's already thought of it and can't move it forward (as you've suggested earlier).

    She responded to my email and wants to set up a meeting. She said she'd love to discuss the current structure and plans for the future.

    Sounds promising, no?
    That sounds terrific! She has recognized that you have some good ideas and that you are wanting to explore them with her in a way that is not abrasive to her. You're not trying to ram anything down her throat her criticizing the way things have been done in the past. You're just wanting to discuss some of your thoughts and looking for a way to help her with her goals in a way that would be a good fit for you.

    It might take a while for the situation to evolve to the point at which you actually get a new job, but I think the reaction you got was about as good as any you could hope for.

    Good luck! ... and keep me posted!
    llg
  8. by   Q.
    Of course, now the challenge comes on if I take another job that's offered to me at another organization, or buy my time and wait for this one to potentially pan out.
  9. by   purplemania
    I did a similar thing by writing a proposal on why the position should be created and what the job description would entail. I also outlined what I perceived to be the benefits to the facility in establishing this position. If you have any numbers that would enhance the proposal. Also, anything "evidence-based", or aligning with current nursing trends, JCAHO, State guidelines, etc. will strengthen your position. I got hired and had to create the position from the ground up but it has been fun and I have learned a lot.
  10. by   llg
    Quote from Q.
    Of course, now the challenge comes on if I take another job that's offered to me at another organization, or buy my time and wait for this one to potentially pan out.
    I guess you just have to go with your gut on that one. Does the other job feel like it is the right job for you long-term or is it just an escape from your current job? Is the possible job at your current employer worth waiting for? ... worth taking a risk for? How likely do you think it is that it will materialize?

    llg
  11. by   Q.
    Quote from llg
    I guess you just have to go with your gut on that one. Does the other job feel like it is the right job for you long-term or is it just an escape from your current job? Is the possible job at your current employer worth waiting for? ... worth taking a risk for? How likely do you think it is that it will materialize?

    llg
    Tough questions.
    I haven't interviewed for the other job in question, however, it would be a good career move as far as upward mobility just based on the job description. I have an interview set for the 14th of Jan. The job is as at a manager level (versus now I am at a coordinator level) and is responsible for leading a Community/Public Health Outreach division at the local medical college. They were ideally looking for a MPH but apparently are interested in me.

    My meeting with the Director at my current organization is for Jan 28th. Truthfully, the job I'm potentially trying to create here (a Perinatal Education Manager) would be more my "ideal" in that it fits with my thesis work, still deals with patient education and a bigger bonus is it's tied to my clinical area of expertise and interests. The job that I described above would be good in that it would give me experience in ANY sort of patient/public education and would move me out of staff development which is somewhat my goal.

    Long range goal: I see myself as at a Director level of some sort for education/outreach at a large non-profit organization geared towards women's health, like March of Dimes, The Red Cross, or other organizations like the Endometriosis Association, etc.

    As far as how likely this potential job here could materialize, I don't know. I do know that we are in the process of alot of changes here, and I do know that a similar position exists at our sister organizations, so it would make sense as we all move towards more shared, regional resources that an equivalent would be here as well. In addition, the Women's Service Division has been known to create positions based on need: they did it 5 years ago for staff educator type role (however the person who actually proposed the position wasn't offered the job, nor was it ever posted) So, if I had to bet on it, I would bet the position would materialize eventually; just not sure when or who.

    I guess it looks like I answered my own question.
    Last edit by Q. on Jan 5, '05
  12. by   llg
    Another thought ... can you delay your interview on the 14th? Can you call and push it back a week or two? You wouldn't have to give a big explanation, just say that something has come up that means you can't make the appointment on the 14th. With a delay of a week or two for the interview, you might be able to talk with your director before you would have to respond to a possible job offer.

    llg
  13. by   Q.
    Heh, yeah well...interesting twist to the scenario:

    The interview date on the 14th was tentative. Originally the interview day was the 10th and apparently will be conducted by a selection committee. All next week is absolutely horrible as I'm teaching classes every single day from 8am-4pm except on Friday. I can not miss these. Many of these are specialized classes that I only teach, and the ones that aren't, I'd feel horrible for dumping on my coworkers over an interview.

    So I tell the person on the phone that the 10th is virtually impossible; the 14th is wide open and all the following week. She said she would call me back after she speaks with the selection committee.

    So I get home and find her message. Apparently the selection committee wishes to make a decision next week, and Friday they aren't available, and later in the day on the 10th they aren't available either. The message was basically I interview on the 10th at their prescribed time, or I don't interview at all. :angryfire

    Jeez, what is THAT about? I mean, obviously they are interested in me so most likely that means I have alot of committments at my current job that I don't just want to ditch. And based on my resume alone, one could see all the various projects and committees and things that I am involved in.

    My husband thinks I should call in sick and go to the interview. But honestly, that kind of attitude from them, the complete inflexibility and apparent lack of respect for my schedule and committments just really turned me off. I offered two alternatives: a different day that week or just late in the day on the 10th, and then ANY DAY/TIME AT ALL the week of the 17th. I mean, did they ever think that the reason they WANT to interview me is because of the work I do, and the way I do it and I'm reliable?

    Ugh.

    What would you do?
    Last edit by Q. on Jan 5, '05
  14. by   Havin' A Party!
    Quote from Q.
    ... What would you do?
    Sounds like they're trying to out-power you into coming in. I'd politely make sure my situation was communicated, offer additional alternative dates, and hold my ground. I'd consider their inflexibility as a potential red flag.

    Wouldn't wanna start somewhere new with them believing they can totally control me or that I'm the submissive type. The tone they're setting wouldn't appeal to me at all.

    Remember: The best they're ever gonna treat you is during the interview stage before you've committed. If they're beginning the relationship in the manner you describe, I can only imagine the possibilities down the road.

    Don't forget there are many opportunities out there.

    Please keep us posted.

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