ICU, when to advance?

  1. I have taken my first nursing job at a community hospital general ICU. I intend to move on to larger hospitals as soon as possible as there are numerous academic and trauma centers around. Question: how much experience do I need to get hired in bigger ICU's (including or excluding orientation)? And how do I go about this without upsetting my current manager and staff?

    Thanks.
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  2. 4 Comments

  3. by   one2one
    This is only MY opinion for what it's worth. Starting off in the general ICU of a community hospital is a great place to start because you'll get to see a little bit of everything as opposed to a specialized ICU where you concentrate in only one area. I would try to give it two years if you can. You should get some good basic experiences. Then it might be helpful to take the CCRN exam and get your certification. (It impresses other employers). I don't think your current manager would feel upset with you for moving on after two years.
  4. by   Corvette Guy
    Quote from one2one
    This is only MY opinion for what it's worth. Starting off in the general ICU of a community hospital is a great place to start because you'll get to see a little bit of everything as opposed to a specialized ICU where you concentrate in only one area. I would try to give it two years if you can. You should get some good basic experiences. Then it might be helpful to take the CCRN exam and get your certification. (It impresses other employers). I don't think your current manager would feel upset with you for moving on after two years.
    I was thinking more along the lines of 12 months with a full-time schedule. Otherwise, I agree with the above.
  5. by   RNPamP
    I think it depends on the needs and capabilities of these teaching and trauma hospitals. My first job out of nursing school was in an urban academic setting, and they had no problem hiring me right out of school. You actually may get the most out of getting your training at one of these institutions, since they have the best resources and most up to date clinical practices. Check to see if the academic hospitals have an internship program for graduate nurses; you may receive as much as 6 months of orientation and classes. Believe me, after that you will be well prepared for what they throw at you. Good luck!
  6. by   piper_for_hire
    Why wait at all? Getting a job in a busy inner-city ICU is easy (at least around here) because people are always leaving. I went into one as my first job and it was a great learning experience.

    As far as upsetting your manager - just tell him/her that you crave a little more action.

    -S

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