I do not like patient care nursing :(

  1. 0 hello there! So I am not sure what to do.... I have been a nurse for about 2 and half years now and I hate it.... I have done trauma/Ortho nursing in a level 2 trauma hospital.... Hated that and the night time hours and so I switched to dialysis nursing for the day shift position. I did not like that either and now I am doing post partum nursing night shift. I am just sick of the inconstancy of my schedule and the constant anxiety of charting and finishing things up before I can finally go home. I don't want to feel this way already about nursing and my job. I know there are non clinical RN jobs such as telephonic and working for insurance companies but I don't think I would like that either. I feel like non clinical RN jobs would not pay a lot. I am not sure what to do. I still want to be looked upon as if I am making a difference and not just "oh you're a nurse who works in an office". I am not sure where to go with my nursing career.... Any advise from anyone? And I know some people are going to say why did I go into nursing if I don't like patient care? I don't mind it but I don't want to do it for much longer. Patients are too demanding, I don't like the hours and I like slower paced atmosphere.
  2. Visit  Nurseheidi321 profile page

    About Nurseheidi321

    Joined Feb '14; Posts: 6; Likes: 1.

    34 Comments so far...

  3. Visit  cayenne06 profile page
    0
    What did you do before you were an RN? Patient care isn't for everyone, but most professional jobs are stressful and demanding. I work at an OBGYN clinic (in addition to an inpatient LDRP job), and while it does pay less, it is much less stressful and you have time to get to know your patients and make a real care plan that can promote their overall health.
  4. Visit  nynursey_ profile page
    0
    Could you get involved in case management or some type of care coordinator position? It would afford you the opportunity to use your nursing skills in a different way and have less to do with direct, hands-on patient care.
  5. Visit  Nurseheidi321 profile page
    0
    I went straight out of high school for nursing school. I am 24 and nursing is all I have done so far. I just know I cannot see myself doing hospital nursing for the rest of my career.
  6. Visit  Mulan profile page
    1
    Post partum was the best (and easiest and least stressful) area I ever worked in.

    If you don't like postpartum, I don't know what to say.

    You mention constant anxiety, is that the problem?
    prnqday likes this.
  7. Visit  SionainnRN profile page
    1
    You might just have to stick it out. Three jobs in 2.5 years is a lot and doesn't give you a whole lot of time to get really settled and comfortable in the position. That can be a big cause if your issues. Otherwise try clinic/office nursing. It's less pay but standard hours and less stress. Bottom line is we don't know you or your issues/priorities, so we can't really answer it for you. Try to find something you're passionate about.

    Sent from my iPhone using allnurses.com
    llg likes this.
  8. Visit  mclennan profile page
    21
    Hey. Watch it. We nurses who "work in offices" make HUGE DIFFERENCES in people's lives. Just as much, if not more than nurses in clinical settings. You might have pushed meds through an IV, hung blood or suctioned trachs, but nurses who "work in offices" made sure your patients got their procedures approved by their insurance companies ahead of time, fought for more follow up with specialists, ordered their DME, arranged for post discharge care at home, educated their families, helped them determine DNR status, coordinated referrals with their PCP, facilitated communication between hospitalists, specialists, PCPs, the insurance company and the patient/family, hooked them up with social workers and transportation resources, got them their meds delivered to their door for cheap, consoled and counseled the family about end of life issues, mailed out tons of info on disease management and local agencies, met with the patient in the office to give them salt substitutes, a scale, a BP cuff, a glucometer and strips, and spent 2 hours showing them how to use these things correctly, and spent HOURS documenting all this within compliance, and sitting in endless meetings with doctors, management and other nurses "who work in offices" trying to provide the best care for patients for the most important time in their health care.....OUTSIDE that hospital room. GOT IT? Good.
    SHGR, impossiblepluto, cayenne06, and 18 others like this.
  9. Visit  nynursey_ profile page
    1
    Quote from mclennan
    Hey. Watch it. We nurses who "work in offices" make HUGE DIFFERENCES in people's lives. Just as much, if not more than nurses in clinical settings. You might have pushed meds through an IV, hung blood or suctioned trachs, but nurses who "work in offices" made sure your patients got their procedures approved by their insurance companies ahead of time, fought for more follow up with specialists, ordered their DME, arranged for post discharge care at home, educated their families, helped them determine DNR status, coordinated referrals with their PCP, facilitated communication between hospitalists, specialists, PCPs, the insurance company and the patient/family, hooked them up with social workers and transportation resources, got them their meds delivered to their door for cheap, consoled and counseled the family about end of life issues, mailed out tons of info on disease management and local agencies, met with the patient in the office to give them salt substitutes, a scale, a BP cuff, a glucometer and strips, and spent 2 hours showing them how to use these things correctly, and spent HOURS documenting all this within compliance, and sitting in endless meetings with doctors, management and other nurses "who work in offices" trying to provide the best care for patients for the most important time in their health care.....OUTSIDE that hospital room. GOT IT? Good.
    I have a great deal of respect for any (CM, SW, RN) person that can ensure a patient has approval for procedures, DME, CHHA, coordinate outpatient resources, and ensure the patient has proper teaching. My hospital has been steadily moving toward assigning more of this discharge responsibility to RN's and, let me tell you, it is a huge undertaking.
    HyperSaurus, RN likes this.
  10. Visit  Nurseheidi321 profile page
    1
    I meant no disrespect by office nurses.... At all.
    It does sound like a lot of work. I guess what more I meant by it was that I still want to feel like I am making a difference and by the sounds of it, it is still a very rewarding job
    117800 likes this.
  11. Visit  Nurseheidi321 profile page
    0
    Maybe case management is something I would like. I would just like nursing job that still gives time for a family and not the crazy weekend night shift hours. I want to be happy in a career but I am also the type that wants my outside life to be balanced as well.
  12. Visit  nynursey_ profile page
    0
    Quote from Nurseheidi321
    I meant no disrespect by office nurses.... At all.
    It does sound like a lot of work. I guess what more I meant by it was that I still want to feel like I am making a difference and by the sounds of it, it is still a very rewarding job
    That's sort of why I mentioned either a) staying on an inpatient unit as a discharge coordinator/case manager or b) looking into physician office nursing. Or even coordinating home care. There are a lot of plausible options.
  13. Visit  CWONgal profile page
    2
    Maybe nursing just isn't for you? There's no shame in it, really. Unfortunately we are led to believe we need to make our life plan straight out of high school. I remember being told years ago that most folks have three careers in a lifetime. I was a school teacher years ago and quit after 4.5 years. I felt I was doing the kids a disservice because my heart wasn't in it so I quit. I'm glad I did because I LOVE being a nurse and I get to use my teaching experience all the time.
    ddl77 and Emergent like this.
  14. Visit  nynursey_ profile page
    1
    Quote from CWONgal
    Maybe nursing just isn't for you? There's no shame in it, really. Unfortunately we are led to believe we need to make our life plan straight out of high school. I remember being told years ago that most folks have three careers in a lifetime. I was a school teacher years ago and quit after 4.5 years. I felt I was doing the kids a disservice because my heart wasn't in it so I quit. I'm glad I did because I LOVE being a nurse and I get to use my teaching experience all the time.
    While this may not be applicable to the OP, I can certainly see it. If people can start nursing as their second career, nurses can definitely move to another field as a second career.
    Emergent likes this.

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