I definitely not recommend nursing.

  1. I basically gave up 2 years of my sons lives when they were 8 and 10 to complete my RN. I never saw them awake till the weekend. I had school from 0630 till 12:45 and worked as a secretary on a psych unit from 1400 till 2230. I thought I was doing it to provide them with a secure future. All it gave them was a mother who was stressed out, had back surgery twice, and missed their school concerts and PTA meetings because she was always at work. Luckily they are now grown and have turned out well. But I missed too much, and I can't get it back. I don't feel we are compensated for our sacrifices, nor are we supported or respected by "mahogany hall" administrators. And I would like to know where in this country an RN makes $25.00 to $30.00 an hour. I've been an ICU nurse for 10 years and the best I pull is $18.00. No it's not just about the money, it's about not having the time to give the nursing care you want to give. If I have a patient going for CABG, and they are nervous and scared, I don't have time to sit and explain and encourage, but I'm supposed to take the time to write on the education sheet the teaching I've done. That's hypocritical, but it's the facts. No I wouldn't recommend this back wrenching, exhausting , thankless, tiring, heart wrenching, disrespected job to anyone.
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  2. 108 Comments

  3. by   shee1a
    As for the money. I have read that nurses in Boston, MA make 25-35 an hour. Agency nurses also make decent money I have seen some advertisements for pay to 34 an hour. Im sure both of these already include diffs. I hope yours doesnt already include your diffs.
  4. by   joebud
    I know many health care professionals who are opting out of the industry and going into alternatives and helping as many if not more people then they did in health care. reply to our message or write to us at joebud@erols.com and I will pass on the information you would need to look into an area of alternatives.
  5. by   tremmi
    Thanx, Kona2, I really appreciate the kind words. It is so frustrating to really care about the people you take care of and to have administration throw up brick walls every step of the way.
  6. by   Genista
    [QUOTE]Originally posted by tremmi:
    And I would like to know where in this country an RN makes $25.00 to $30.00 an hour. I've been an ICU nurse for 10 years and the best I pull is $18.00. No it's not just about the money, it's about not having the time to give the nursing care you want to give...

    tremmi- Sorry to hear your frustrations. I know what you mean about not having time for giving the right kind of care.Time to teach and comfort is very condensed in the acute care setting. I try my best, too- often wishing I could have done more. As for the comment about pay- well, no, it's not the main thing, but sure it is important. I live in California & pay in my area is $22-30. for staff RNs in the hospital setting (more for shift diff. & holidays). But keep in mind that the cost of living. Median home prices in my area are $250,000. If you are interested in moving to California, there is currently a nursing shortage here & many hospitals pay hiring bonus and moving cost for ICU experience. I wish I could offer you some words of encouragement- you sound like a caring nurse (and we need to keep ones like you). Take care.
  7. by   julie foster
    Tremmi--couldn't help but have to put in my 2 cents worth, if its even worth that! I certainly understand how you felt about missing out on your children's lives. That certainly is a hazard of going back to school after you have a family. My son was 2 when I went back to school, so I can relate. However, I still feel that overall it was worth it. I guess I've been very fortunate, I've seldom had to miss anything. I've always worked with others who were willing to exchange dates on a schedule, so I did not often have to miss events. Sometimes, though it does seem like all I ever do is work or sleep! I wonder if you ever get caught up on sleep?

    The most frustrating part of nursing I've found, like many others, is the lack of time to spend with my patients. I did not become a nurse to do paperwork. But sometimes that seems like all I have time for. Or else we are so far behind (I work ER) that we have to rush pts. through like they were on an assembly line or something. Often pts. present to the ER with more than just the obvious problem, but because of the load, we as nurses don't have time to find out what they REALLY need. It's always rush, rush, rush. Get them in and get them out--there's always more waiting.

    You know what? I talked with an aunt last week who has been an RN for almost 40 years, and she said she had many of they same feelings early in her career. About not having time to spend with pts. I mean. So maybe that's just part of nursing. If you're good and a truly caring nurse, you never will feel like you spent enough time comforting your patients.

    Hang in there. God bless you all.
  8. by   lindagayle
    I have been an RN since 1972 and when I graduated the chances for work were tremendous. Wonderful opps, lots of new and exciting times to be in nursing. As the time went by, the opps became somewhat limited and the joy of nursing became drudgery. However, only the individual can challenge the future edges of the career of nursing. There are many changes and future developments coming up for us seasoned nurses as well as the new comers. To paraphrase one on the road less travelled, we have the freedom to choose every step of the way, the manner in which we respond to the challenge of nursing.
  9. by   vawoman123
    i agree with you, nursing is very hard, if i had to do it again, i wouldnt be a nurse. i did it cause i like careing for people, but it seems no one appreciates it, and always wants you to do more, and no help.the higherups, dont care how many workers are working, as long as the numbers are ok.which means, you can have 35 patients and 4or 5 people working, and the patients dont get all the care they should.
  10. by   Jeanbean
    I'm sorry to hear that you're so frustrated. I was very frustrated so I changed jobs and just started a new job as a home health nurse 1 month ago. I love it- I get lots of one-on-one time w/ pts and a lot of what I do is teaching. The pay varies day to day since it is based on $30 per-visit. I live in a mid-size town so I don't have to do alot of driving (10-30mi/day).
  11. by   diffster
    Wow! I can't believe some of the salaries you guys are getting. In Mississippi a critical care nurse is lucky to get 18/hr including shift diff. We do not get extra for holidays or any other special times. We work 12/hr shifts, either 3-2-2-3 or 7-7 (days on and off), with one short day to take away our built in overtime. We have lots of nurses who were imported from the Philipines or Canada who were brought in to "fix" the nursing shortage while simultaneously allowing the hospitals to continue paying nurses the salaries they have been paying. The turnover rate is enormous, and new grads make up the bulk of the nursing staff (except for the imports). Each May we have an enormous influx of new grads. The new grads usually stay for a year, maybe 2. (until they get enough experience to go elsewhere. I stay to be close to my kids (Their mom and I are divorced). I love taking care of patients, but I hate being treated like a factory line worker. I have actually heard an administrator say,"If they don't like it, we'll just get more nurses. They're a dime a dozen, like interchangeable cogs in a machine." (This was in response to being told that the nurses would walk if the built in overtime was taken away). (Obviously, the overtime was taken, the nurses walked, and they got new nurses). The money in our area is in home health. Home health nurses make 18-22/hr or per pt. (depending on how their particular contract is negotiated). The down side of this is: in our area, many of the homes you must go into are extremely nasty. (I know, I've done home health). I don't mean dirty. I mean nasty. Some of the homes have rat b.m. all over the floors, walls and floors with cracks so large you can see through to the outside, dirty dishes piled up all over the entire kitchen (to the point that you can't even find the sink), and some of the homes are even worse. Also, some of the homes are in extremely dangerous neighborhoods. So anyway, the hospital is the only logical choice. However, as I explained, the hospitals treat the nurses badly. No matter how much you enjoy being a caregiver, being treated like dirt takes a large portion of it out of you. I don't know the solution. I doubt their really is one.
    diffster
  12. by   oramar
    Originally posted by diffster:
    Wow! I can't believe some of the salaries you guys are getting. In Mississippi a critical care nurse is lucky to get 18/hr including shift diff. We do not get extra for holidays or any other special times. We work 12/hr shifts, either 3-2-2-3 or 7-7 (days on and off), with one short day to take away our built in overtime. We have lots of nurses who were imported from the Philipines or Canada who were brought in to "fix" the nursing shortage while simultaneously allowing the hospitals to continue paying nurses the salaries they have been paying. The turnover rate is enormous, and new grads make up the bulk of the nursing staff (except for the imports). Each May we have an enormous influx of new grads. The new grads usually stay for a year, maybe 2. (until they get enough experience to go elsewhere. I stay to be close to my kids (Their mom and I are divorced). I love taking care of patients, but I hate being treated like a factory line worker. I have actually heard an administrator say,"If they don't like it, we'll just get more nurses. They're a dime a dozen, like interchangeable cogs in a machine." (This was in response to being told that the nurses would walk if the built in overtime was taken away). (Obviously, the overtime was taken, the nurses walked, and they got new nurses). The money in our area is in home health. Home health nurses make 18-22/hr or per pt. (depending on how their particular contract is negotiated). The down side of this is: in our area, many of the homes you must go into are extremely nasty. (I know, I've done home health). I don't mean dirty. I mean nasty. Some of the homes have rat b.m. all over the floors, walls and floors with cracks so large you can see through to the outside, dirty dishes piled up all over the entire kitchen (to the point that you can't even find the sink), and some of the homes are even worse. Also, some of the homes are in extremely dangerous neighborhoods. So anyway, the hospital is the only logical choice. However, as I explained, the hospitals treat the nurses badly. No matter how much you enjoy being a caregiver, being treated like dirt takes a large portion of it out of you. I don't know the solution. I doubt their really is one.
    diffster
    Dear diffster from Mississippi, Did you ever think about travel nursing? Seems to me that with your experience you could name your own place and time. Some travel nurse agency offer benefits and pensions. The money would certainly be better. You could get back between assignments to see the kids. No, I am not a recruiter, it was just a thought.

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  13. by   Mijourney
    Hi Tremmi,
    I fully empathize and sympathize with your plight in nursing. I must comment that never having been exposed to the internet until several years ago, I am glad that there is a forum such as this bb for those wanting to vent issues and concerns anonymously and publicly. I am always intrigued by posts and responses when I get a chance to read them, and I enjoy responding as well.

    I am one of the nurses in favor of those who have a strong desire to pursue work in nursing to come in. Nursing could use a "few" more good people. However, I think it is important for nurses, especially those at the bedside, to actively pursue other options for work or career satisfaction while working; even while raising families, if possible. Joebud's post gave reference to alternatives for health professionals. As you have indicated, the practice of nursing is or can be very stressful, tiring, and thankless. Working for 30 years at the same bedside, in my opinion, is no longer practical or wise unless you truly enjoy and are satisfied with your work. I do feel, nevertheless, that we need to encourage good candidates to pursue nursing. It is a broad-based field with so much potential where one can practice nursing directly or indirectly or use nursing knowledge and skills to work in another occupation. Best wishes.
  14. by   lita1857
    tremmi I definitely understand your posting and here in Rochester, N.Y average RN 10-15yrs experience makes 20-30dollars per hr plus differentials for off shifts/weekends/holidays etc. We are not heaven but we aren't hell either, sounds like Texas has the corner on that this moment. The company I work for is called ViaHeath, they are on the web,,,they do have a sign on bonus- travel expenses etc. if you need more info e-mail me lita1857@hotmail.com Best of luck to you!

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