I definitely not recommend nursing. - page 7

I basically gave up 2 years of my sons lives when they were 8 and 10 to complete my RN. I never saw them awake till the weekend. I had school from 0630 till 12:45 and worked as a secretary on a... Read More

  1. by   Asiancutie
    ditto to above post. yeah, why didn't you take student loans while going to school so you don't have to work. don't you have tuition reimbursements at work? i really want to have kids but im holdin it off because i want to finish school first. life is what you make it and you create the circumstances around you is my opinion. but don't listen to me. i'm young, inexperienced and stupid.
  2. by   KarenAR
    Quote from 1styear
    Someone having to work an insane amount of hours while in nursing school is not a reflection of nursing but is one on their lifestyle. Same goes for missing out on childrens activities. Job is thankless? Maybe the pts have no reason to be thankful for your care? NY pays nurses $30 an hour and that's a low estimate for some parts. You don't make that? You're unhappy with your wages --change positions or employer. Your back hurts? Go work in a doctor's office or become a school nurse or a pharm rep or work for a plastic surgeon. The options are so plentiful that there's no justifying some of your complaints.
    I must say, this was a vicious response to the original post, and was definitely spoken like someone who has not had to walk a mile in this nurse's shoes! You should be thankful that you are apparently so fortunate as to have never experienced these frustrations. Please take a second to step back and realize the following:

    (1) Some people DO have to work to put themselves through school and cannot take on student loans.

    (2) Some people ARE at risk of losing their jobs if they miss too many days due to kids' activities. Some people DO have to miss kids' activities if they want to be able to keep feeding/clothing/housing those same kids.

    (3) MANY areas of the country pay WAY less than NY, no matter who the employer is. MANY people cannot just pick up and move to NY for the pay.

    (4) Non-hospital options are not instantly available overnight. They often require EXPERIENCE in those specific areas. Just because there are many different types of nursing, that doesn't mean you can just switch areas whenever you want, as quickly as you want to.

    And - as for your suggestion that maybe Tremmi's patients had no reason to be thankful for her care - good grief! I hope you don't take the same attitude with YOUR patients that you took with Tremmi! Maybe try a little more sensitivity to where people are coming from???? Geez..... :angryfire
  3. by   renerian
    I missed alot too but it gave my children food on the table, clothes, healthcare, prescriptions, and a safe home. Worked with little kids and went to night school. Worked full time to get my other degrees. Yes it is a sacrifice.

    Alot to think about I know. Your underpaid.

    renerian
  4. by   orrnlori
    Quote from KarenAR
    I must say, this was a vicious response to the original post, and was definitely spoken like someone who has not had to walk a mile in this nurse's shoes! You should be thankful that you are apparently so fortunate as to have never experienced these frustrations. Please take a second to step back and realize the following:

    (1) Some people DO have to work to put themselves through school and cannot take on student loans.

    (2) Some people ARE at risk of losing their jobs if they miss too many days due to kids' activities. Some people DO have to miss kids' activities if they want to be able to keep feeding/clothing/housing those same kids.

    (3) MANY areas of the country pay WAY less than NY, no matter who the employer is. MANY people cannot just pick up and move to NY for the pay.

    (4) Non-hospital options are not instantly available overnight. They often require EXPERIENCE in those specific areas. Just because there are many different types of nursing, that doesn't mean you can just switch areas whenever you want, as quickly as you want to.

    And - as for your suggestion that maybe Tremmi's patients had no reason to be thankful for her care - good grief! I hope you don't take the same attitude with YOUR patients that you took with Tremmi! Maybe try a little more sensitivity to where people are coming from???? Geez..... :angryfire
    If you look at this poster's information they are a first year nursing student. He/she has much to learn about life, and about being a nurse. If the tone of the response is indicative of attitude, this first year student will not finish.
  5. by   dsczephyr
    This particular post sure generated a lot of response! My own perspective is a bit different. I have been an RN for less than one year. I started my prereqs more than ten years ago and with a military husband, I just kept plugging away. I wanted to be a nurse so very badly. Doing volunteer EMS only whetted my appetite.

    It was the high of my life (next to marrying my husband and having my children) when I graduated nursing school with high honors, took the boards and learned that I had made RN on the Fourth of July. Since then, I have become very sad and disillusioned about nursing. I started off in a major teaching hospital and left after five months. In my evaluation there I learned that I asked too many questions which showed I didn't think independently or critically. After, I felt awkward about asking questions and felt I could not stay there. I was not actually asked to leave, but knew that it was only a matter of time. So I left and went to a local community hospital.

    At the end of my orientation at the community hospital I was asked to write a "nice letter of resignation." I was told that I didn't manage my time well because I talked too much to the patients and tried to solve all their problems, and I couldn't. I was told I should be doing research or teaching nursing by my nurse manager. She read a statement to me by my preceptor, a wonderful nurse who had been in nursing for decades that said that I knew more about nursing than she did. My evening preceptor told me I was "brilliant" and that my head got in the way of getting things done.

    Funny. I was usually done within twenty minutes of my shift with everything the vast majority of my worked shifts while orienting on days. It changed when I went to evenings. My preceptor of evenings had been a nurse a year longer than me and had once been a classmate. With her, if I was doing "this," I should have been doing "that" and vice-versa. My timing was never what it should have been.

    Today, I can't even get an interview for another nursing position. I've held two nursing positions in eight months and my guess is, no one can get past that.
    So now, I work per diem as a case manager in a domestic violence shelter (work that I love, but it's not nursing). It pays $12.00 an hour. My supervisor there has told me she thinks "very highly" of my work. I also still do volunteer EMS and no one has any complaints about my time management at a scene or in the back of an ambulance.

    As much as I love the case management work, I miss nursing. I would absolutely love to be able to recommend nursing as a career, but my experiences keep me from doing so. I think nursing as a profession still has a lot of 'growing up' to do in terms of how it treats its members.
  6. by   KarenAR
    dsczephyr, I am sorry you have had that experience! It is a shame that questioning and thinking - and heaven forbid, talking with patients and their families - are not valued more highly in the clinical setting.

    I have also had the problem of being made to feel that I ask too many questions. (By my charge nurse, in particular...) In school, they really pounded it into us that we must always do everything the exactly right and evidence-based way...for that and my own reasons, I am always looking to find out the exactly right way to do everything before I do it.

    As a new nurse, there are a lot of things that are still new to me - and unfortunately I do not have time to go look up the latest research in the middle of my shift. So I ask questions. I personally think that's better than screwing up in the middle of doing whatever it is that needs to be done!

    Quote from dsczephyr
    I think nursing as a profession still has a lot of 'growing up' to do in terms of how it treats its members.
    I absolutely agree with this statement!

    Do you also find that nursing tends to be extremely clique-y? I feel like the more friendly I am with the nurses in my unit's "popular" clique, the easier my work life is. (Fortunately for me, I tend to be friendly with ALL my coworkers, so it works out OK - but I still don't like the feeling I get about this. What happens if I'm someday not in the clique's good graces?)
  7. by   MelissaRN
    I haven't seen too many "cliques" but I have never, ever been spoken so rudely to before by co-workers since becoming a nurse. When I was a tech on another floor I actually witnessed a nurse shove a tech! It's ridiculous.

    I don't mind floor nursing, but the co-workers and lack of support is what has pushed me away from it. The charge nurses encourage you to ask questions, but when you do they act irritated!! I don't care though, I ask anyway and tough if they don't like it.

    I'm making about $25 an hour at my hospital job (includes night differential) and am leaving for a lower paying job. I know alot of nurses that have taken lower paying jobs in exchange for less stress and absolutely love their jobs. For me it's not about the money. I want to be at a job that I love and am not depressed about.
  8. by   KarenAR
    I guess the reason nursing is like that is that nursing is such a stressful job, people just don't know how to handle their stress? Still no excuse, though. If your job causes you so much stress you shove other people, then it's definitely time for a change!! I guess being a "2nd career" nurse, this is easier for me to say, because I have already made a huge career change. Thankfully our family finances allowed me to do this (just barely - and I now have lots of debt). But I think if it got to the point where I was shoving people, I would just have to get out of it no matter what, even if it meant I had to rely on government assistance for a while...

    I agree, quality of life is more important than the extra pay. Besides, when your extra pay is sucked up by therapy and antidepressants because you're so so wrecked emotionally and psychologically from the job, then the money might come out even in the end anyway! ha ha (Only halfway kidding, as I am IN therapy right now - partly to deal with work stress - and the therapist suggested antidepressants...)
  9. by   MelissaRN
    Therapy? No doubt. I went to a therapist through our employee assistance program. She was pretty helpful. The only thing though was that she told me that I needed to get it in my head to put the workday behind me. Basically "realize I did the best job possible and it's behind me". Ha! easier said then done. I had that thought in my head then the nagging question would come, yea but is your best good enough?
  10. by   nurse_robin
    I have been an RN for 20 years now and have 2 adult daughters in college, and a 13 yo dgt still at home. No, nursing is not the easiest job in the world, but we have such flexibility as nurses. I have not in my 20 years found the best job in the world, but I have been allowed to experience different types of nursing....med-surg, home health, icu, insurance company, ltc, week-ends only, registry, clinics etc.... Heck, I have even become disgruntled as a nurse and tried out other fields, but found that I missed working with patients too much!Every job has it's own set of drawbacks as well as benefits. There are too many opporutnities out here for us to be stuck in a job that we don't like! Not very many careers offer that opportunity. I'm now considering going back to school to be some sort of NP! The opportunities are limitless for us. On to the subject of children: There are times when, as a new nurse, I went to work while my own children were sick at home and felt tons of guilt while at work. As I became more confident as a nurse, I set my priorities and decided that when one of my children was very ill, not to go to work and stay at home to take care of my sick child. (Of course, Employers not too happy with my decision...but oh well) Despite my guilty feelings I had while raising my children (missing meetings, school plays, they have let me know that I did a very good job of raising them. They learned to be independent, assertive women with good heads on their shoulders and I am very proud of them. They have a good work ethic by seeing Mom (and Dad) get up to go to work. They know that it takes sacrfices to be a good provider. They have had friends whose parents couldn't provide them with the nicer things in life and they learned to appreciate them. No, they were'nt designer clothing and $100 sneaker kids who demanded to have expensive things given to them at their command, but they know the value of a dollar. I think that nurses who are Mom's deal with a lot of guilt because of our jobs, but know that children are very forgiving and we need to stop beating ourselves up over things that we can't do with our children. The quality of time strongly outweighs the quantitiy of time we spend with our children. <<<<HUGS>>>>To those of you who are disgruntled about your jobs. Know that you are not stuck in some dead-end job. Look for other opportunities. Proud to be an RN, Robin I love what I do!
  11. by   Mandarella
    Hmmm...I believe starting salaries for a graduate RN start at $19/hr, more for specialized care .75 more for a BS. This is Upstate NY.

    Quote from tremmi
    I basically gave up 2 years of my sons lives when they were 8 and 10 to complete my RN. I never saw them awake till the weekend. I had school from 0630 till 12:45 and worked as a secretary on a psych unit from 1400 till 2230. I thought I was doing it to provide them with a secure future. All it gave them was a mother who was stressed out, had back surgery twice, and missed their school concerts and PTA meetings because she was always at work. Luckily they are now grown and have turned out well. But I missed too much, and I can't get it back. I don't feel we are compensated for our sacrifices, nor are we supported or respected by "mahogany hall" administrators. And I would like to know where in this country an RN makes $25.00 to $30.00 an hour. I've been an ICU nurse for 10 years and the best I pull is $18.00. No it's not just about the money, it's about not having the time to give the nursing care you want to give. If I have a patient going for CABG, and they are nervous and scared, I don't have time to sit and explain and encourage, but I'm supposed to take the time to write on the education sheet the teaching I've done. That's hypocritical, but it's the facts. No I wouldn't recommend this back wrenching, exhausting , thankless, tiring, heart wrenching, disrespected job to anyone.
  12. by   Torachan
    julie foster - don't put yourself down. Your opinion is worth just as much as the next persons. Being a RN probably more. Nurse's need to stop selling us short..... That's my dollars worth
  13. by   Torachan
    ....hmmm this thread has gone on for ages....

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