I definitely not recommend nursing. - page 6

I basically gave up 2 years of my sons lives when they were 8 and 10 to complete my RN. I never saw them awake till the weekend. I had school from 0630 till 12:45 and worked as a secretary on a... Read More

  1. by   Fgr8Out
    Reading all of these posts, I have to wonder if I'm the exception. True, my pay could be significantly higher for the work Nursing involves. Yes, Holidays can be a trial if you routinely find you have to work them. Irregular shifts, days off, nights, etc... all take a heavy toll as well.

    But for some mysterious, magical reason... I've still had opportunities to spend time with my children, make a difference in a patients life, grab some sleep once in awhile, earn enough to put a roof over my head, food on my table and even splurge on an indulgence or two. I've rarely, if ever, had anyone slander my Profession... and I do have a high regard for myself and my peers in this very unforgiving occupation, where we are presented extreme challenges everyday and sometimes constantly looking over our shoulders in an effort to watch our own backs when it feels as if nobody else is looking out for us.

    I've had people ask me if they should enter Nursing... and I try to be very thoughtful in my answer. Those who would be put off by this work, I have no trouble telling them "No, I don't think this job is for you." For those who I see potential I say "Yes, it is a wonderful Profession, but not without it's pitfalls." I think this can be said for many high paying jobs available.

    Yes, I've had my moments when I think I might move onto something different. But, I'm still learning something new in my current Profession everyday. And so long as I'm still learning, I'm still willing to give this often unforgiving Career a chance.

    Peace
  2. by   Grace Oz
    When I started out, way back in 1967 !! I felt SO very proud being a nurse. Once that uniform was on, I became "someone"!
    I had this incredible sense of nobility & worth. I was eager to learn, eager to please. The years have rolled on by, all TOO fast, & now I'm a 51 year old woman, still nursing, but the sense of nobility, worth & pride has all been slowly chipped away. Some memories are priceless & will be forever treasured. Some are nightmares & best forgotten. On the one hand, I'm grateful for the experience, on the other....
    Still, it's no good looking back, all you get is a stiff neck!!:chuckle
    Would I reccommend nursing as a career? ... Once I would have, & did, but not anymore. I'm at the closing stages of my nursing career, only work agency now & just do the odd shift when it suits me. Don't like what's happened to the nursing profession, believe it's changed for the worse. Am loathe to suggest it revert back to "in my day", but...
    Everything has it's season.
    Cheers,
    Grace
  3. by   tnnurse2002
    Today's nursing is no longer what it used to be. Nurses used to be allowed to take care of the patients wants and needs. Now it seems that the family members wants take precedence over common sence and nursing judgement.
  4. by   sbic56
    If someone was considering college I would not recommend putting those years into a nursing degree. The wages nurses receive are hardly comparable, especially for BSN and MSN degrees, to the same years put towards degrees in other professions. Of course, it is not all about money, but the profession is gruelling work at best; very hard on you physically and mentally. Sure there are some rewards, but more and more the patient is becoming the customer and the nurse is becoming the servant. Then as you get older and really want to get out of it, you realize how hard it would be to match the income. Avoid this delemma...pick another career!!
  5. by   JillyT
    Tremmi, It's true about the wages in CA due to nursing shotage. I live in Northern Ca (Sacramento area) and know of nurses who make $40 per hour. It's also MUCH cheaper to live in Sacramento than San Francisco.
  6. by   Jojo ford
    There is no way to convince someone of the worth of Nursing unless you can share the highs and lows and accepts that it take s both of these phases in a day of nursing to create a sense of value...not just the job but the effect it has on the multitude on people you will encounter. When I started my General Nursing course several of the Probies dropped out half way through the first 6 weeks. One girl in particular I tried to talk out of going and finally told her she would be back! Seventeen years later who did I bump into in the halls of the University. All she said was "Okay, you can say I told you so!" My reply was I am pleased to see you made it back. She now works as Clinical Consultant. You only need to be able to accept the intrinsic worth of every human being in that we are all on a journey of discovery that will not be without its bumps and rough patches.
    But the honour of helping every trusting soul that commits their fragile and vulnerable existence to your care is without price... merely the reason for humanities existence.
  7. by   NEWER7
    If you feel nursing is a thankless job you are in the wrong business. Who took care of you while you were having your back surgery, the nurses, who was there to explain to you all the things the doctor did not. who quieted your fears if just for a while. who made you feel that all will be well. who gave you reassurance and was there when you came around from anesthesia? That all imortant thankless person who you would not reccommed to do the job. It takes a special person to be a thankless person. and I would not give it up. I am in the lpn to RN bridge for the fact that I want to be a nurse and I love the job. The nurse is the bridge between the patient, the family the docor and those thankless administrators. We are what hold the medical field together. Where would the world be without us?
  8. by   Jojo ford
    I think you misunderstood my previous message. I have nurses for years and still enjoy my profesion. I do not think that telling a prospective canditate that it is all a hoot would provide them with much help. Nursing Education is no longer a cheap method of enlightenment through the apprentice style training it used to be. It is now quite an expensive course that does little to enlighten the student as to the trials and tribulations the career path will provide and I believe it is the shock they encounter that sees many opt out before they have completed the degree or simply move onto another degree or career path that may still be human service oriented but alas not in nursing. I still have patients I cared for many years before who give me a smile in thanks for my efforts and that is what keeps me in the job...certainly not the income which is hardly commensurate with the responsibility we labour under. I enjoy keeping Doctors on their toes and have saved them from many major boo boos and this is purely to fulfil my role as ensurer of patient safety and care. Have a nice day!
  9. by   JennieJenRN
    Is there any field out there that does not have it's up and downs? I think i you hate your job look for a new one. If you wok with adults try peds. nursing has such avast aray o things yu can do! you have to be able to find your place and sometimes that place may change. I love the field would encourage anyone who is hinking to shadow a nurse because Yes some people have no idea what we do and can't handle the demands of it. We just hired a new tech she had a full ride a very impessive school an one week on the unit she is now a teaching major! you have your ups and downs to that ield also! As far as pay ou new grads sat at 20 and you get a raise on your anniver. date and on our conract date!! has anyone ever thought of UNION??? With all of the extras we get we need to add 10% to our houly wage. All because of union!! just a thouht
  10. by   Blackcat99
    Becoming a nurse was the biggest mistake of my life. If I had to do it over I would definately find a different profession.
  11. by   movealong
    Nursing? It's a yes and no type thing for me. Over the years there have been times when I wanted to leave nursing. I wanted to know what a job would be like that didn't not involve death and dying. That was when I was an oncology nurse and I transferred out of that ward shortly after I realized I was burnt out.

    Changing the areas I worked have helped over the years. From hospitals to clinics to doctors offices to private companies and so.

    It is good to know you can stay employed almost anywhere you move to. It may not be exactly the area of nursing you want, but you can work. This was important to me as I am single and always have taken care of myself.

    But bad hours and sometimes unreasonable expectations from employers: patient load, safety issues and hours can drag one down over time. If I had to do it all again? I'm not so sure I would. I think I might have liked a job where everything is not so serious all the time.
  12. by   soltera
    Quote from tremmi
    I basically gave up 2 years of my sons lives when they were 8 and 10 to complete my RN. I never saw them awake till the weekend. I had school from 0630 till 12:45 and worked as a secretary on a psych unit from 1400 till 2230. I thought I was doing it to provide them with a secure future. All it gave them was a mother who was stressed out, had back surgery twice, and missed their school concerts and PTA meetings because she was always at work. Luckily they are now grown and have turned out well. But I missed too much, and I can't get it back. I don't feel we are compensated for our sacrifices, nor are we supported or respected by "mahogany hall" administrators. And I would like to know where in this country an RN makes $25.00 to $30.00 an hour. I've been an ICU nurse for 10 years and the best I pull is $18.00. No it's not just about the money, it's about not having the time to give the nursing care you want to give. If I have a patient going for CABG, and they are nervous and scared, I don't have time to sit and explain and encourage, but I'm supposed to take the time to write on the education sheet the teaching I've done. That's hypocritical, but it's the facts. No I wouldn't recommend this back wrenching, exhausting , thankless, tiring, heart wrenching, disrespected job to anyone.
    you asked about salary,, here in ny rns make 45 an hour!!
  13. by   1styear
    Originally Posted by tremmi
    "I basically gave up 2 years of my sons lives when they were 8 and 10 to complete my RN. I never saw them awake till the weekend. I had school from 0630 till 12:45 and worked as a secretary on a psych unit from 1400 till 2230. I thought I was doing it to provide them with a secure future. All it gave them was a mother who was stressed out, had back surgery twice, and missed their school concerts and PTA meetings because she was always at work. Luckily they are now grown and have turned out well. But I missed too much, and I can't get it back. I don't feel we are compensated for our sacrifices, nor are we supported or respected by "mahogany hall" administrators. And I would like to know where in this country an RN makes $25.00 to $30.00 an hour. I've been an ICU nurse for 10 years and the best I pull is $18.00. No it's not just about the money, it's about not having the time to give the nursing care you want to give. If I have a patient going for CABG, and they are nervous and scared, I don't have time to sit and explain and encourage, but I'm supposed to take the time to write on the education sheet the teaching I've done. That's hypocritical, but it's the facts. No I wouldn't recommend this back wrenching, exhausting , thankless, tiring, heart wrenching, disrespected job to anyone."

    Someone having to work an insane amount of hours while in nursing school is not a reflection of nursing but is one on their lifestyle. Same goes for missing out on childrens activities. Job is thankless? Maybe the pts have no reason to be thankful for your care? NY pays nurses $30 an hour and that's a low estimate for some parts. You don't make that? You're unhappy with your wages --change positions or employer. Your back hurts? Go work in a doctor's office or become a school nurse or a pharm rep or work for a plastic surgeon. The options are so plentiful that there's no justifying some of your complaints.

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