I definitely not recommend nursing. - page 3

I basically gave up 2 years of my sons lives when they were 8 and 10 to complete my RN. I never saw them awake till the weekend. I had school from 0630 till 12:45 and worked as a secretary on a... Read More

  1. by   lita1857
    I second that "amen" and add good luck
  2. by   Lburns
    I am sorry you have had such a bad experience as a nurse. I would recommend nursing to anybody looking for a satisfactory career. I live in CA and there are so many opportunities other than bedside nursing. I love the job, feel very respected by my collegues, family and friends. I make a wage over $30 and have been a RN for 5yrs now. I went back to school to both increase my knowledge base and open up opportunities. It sounds as if nursing hasn't treated you well in the situation you're in but there comes a time when you need to make a choice and be responsible for your decisions. If you no longer like the job, look for something else in nursing or in the health field. Certainly working in MD ofices and gaining relationships with long-term patients or advice line etc would open up your choices other than bedside nursing. Good luck.
  3. by   123lisa
    There are several jobs in Texas through KForce that pay the money you talked about. Just think...you make that kind of money and work less hours = more time for yourself before you life is over and you miss years of your own life! What a great concept. Go to their website and check out the job listings........good luck and God bless
    Originally posted by tremmi:
    I basically gave up 2 years of my sons lives when they were 8 and 10 to complete my RN. I never saw them awake till the weekend. I had school from 0630 till 12:45 and worked as a secretary on a psych unit from 1400 till 2230. I thought I was doing it to provide them with a secure future. All it gave them was a mother who was stressed out, had back surgery twice, and missed their school concerts and PTA meetings because she was always at work. Luckily they are now grown and have turned out well. But I missed too much, and I can't get it back. I don't feel we are compensated for our sacrifices, nor are we supported or respected by "mahogany hall" administrators. And I would like to know where in this country an RN makes $25.00 to $30.00 an hour. I've been an ICU nurse for 10 years and the best I pull is $18.00. No it's not just about the money, it's about not having the time to give the nursing care you want to give. If I have a patient going for CABG, and they are nervous and scared, I don't have time to sit and explain and encourage, but I'm supposed to take the time to write on the education sheet the teaching I've done. That's hypocritical, but it's the facts. No I wouldn't recommend this back wrenching, exhausting , thankless, tiring, heart wrenching, disrespected job to anyone.
  4. by   123lisa
    Go for that MSN, just dont expect much more in the bank!
    Originally posted by lsmo:
    Got to respond to this one-- been a nurse for 16 years in the hospital setting. I have absolutely LOVED my work at times, but frequently found myself HATING my job. For years I took for granted that the "job" or workplace issues that frustrated me were not my responsibilty--out of my control. I found myself conflicted and in "fight or flight" regarding my nursing career. However, over the years I have learned much about what it takes to survive in nursing. I discovered that it started with my unmet needs and expectations--they were most definitely not being met. Working short staffed, administators redesigning the workforce and care delivery systems, stagnant pay and cuts in benefits, etc. etc. I reached the end of my rope. I came to realize that I had become a very unhappy person. I looked around me and many of my coworkers were also very unhappy and, in fact, we were not doing our health any favors dragging all that energy-sapping frustration around. That is when I realized that first and foremost, nurses in general, need to do a better job of taking care of themselves. If our work life isn't what we want--make a change. It won't benefit your health or co-workers, your family, your mate etc. if you are a whining, crabbin' depressed, or burned-out human being. Work is just that, work--it is only as satisfying or fulfilling as you make it. Yea, nursing involves the work of caring and takes many talents, but none so important as CARING for self. It is not reality to think that being a caring person is enough to sustain you in nursing. (Which makes me just cringe when I read about it being a "calling"!!!UGH). Typically, administrators are largely in control of a nurses work "environment" and nurses would agree that nurses need to be "in charge" of their "practice". I wonder how many nurses are really stepping back from their frustrations and thinking about how we can make our work environment a priority. To stand together as we insist on work environment improvements that will enable us to do what we do--the way it should be done. We need more nurses who strategize ways to get to this goal, to work through the problems we are facing, and who insist on only the best for our work life and our patients. Anything less is unacceptable. Sadly,t nursing's huge responsibility and stressful work environmenst devour many of our spirits, and our creativity or commitment is crushed. So, what worked for me was to acknowledge that working conditions need overhauled--but was my responsibility to remain physically, and mentally healthy FOR MYSELF. I have begun to take action. I encourage any of you who still have the stamina to do so as well. If nothing else, you will personally benefit from the change you have created for your own health and well-being. In addition, I encourage you to purge your frustration via letter writing to your politicians, your schools of nursing, the editor of your local paper to let them know what it is you need to do the job of nursing--to KEEP doing the job of nursing. Get heard! Stand up and change your own behavior first--see how you will positively impact those around you. I want to see many things in nursing change for the better. Currently, my survival tactic is to take advantage of my employers tuition reimbursement and am seeking my MSN. I would love to be a part of the solution somehow. Although I plan to remain involved in bedside care, perhaps my additional eduation will afford me more opportunities to influence others. Perhaps in a teaching role, I could influence incoming nursing students regarding survival techniques and impart on them, how important it is to take care of ourselves FIRST...never to allow thinking that to work in a caring profession is to deny yourself proper financial security or self-respect or quality of life. I would like to see nurses be leaders in moving this agenda forward. To be examples for all industry and businesses as to how to CARE for themselves and in doing so create a quality work life and work environment that invites new recruits and retention, rather than repels new and seasoned talent..This will surely not happen without working nurses standing up to unfair labor practices, or ruffling feathers. What better motivation to nurture your physical, mental, and emotional health--I'm gearing up for the challenge--LSMO RNC



  5. by   fyrnymph
    rnirma
    your right Texas does have the corner market in hell for nursing
    I am relocating to NY I can' t take it here anymore
    I hate going to work everyday and I fear the danger that patients are in here...
    don't get sick if your visting texas....the things that I have seen....


    Originally posted by rnirma:
    For the most part I think nurses enjoy their
    jobs. but we do sacrifice time with our families. I have been a R.N. for eleven years and for the first 10 years I sacrificed time with the family during the holidays. I have worked most Thanksgiving, Christmas, New Years, Easter and other Holidays. I have worked most shifts especially nights so that I could be with my family on the holidays, the price was losing sleep and feeling burned out except for the vacations when I was able to sleep more than two nights in a row. I wish someone would have told me what I would have had to sacrifice before entering Nursing School. I would have gone on to graduate and work as a school teacher. I know that most jobs and careers have their disadvantages, but giving up my weekends and holidays for a paycheck is more than I could handle. I now work as a Patient Educator, and a Childbirth Instructor. I set my own hours and have all the major holidays off. I enjoy what I do and has been possible only because of the Nursing Degree I earned.
  6. by   karabuny
    HELP ME PLEASE...I have no clue of what to do, I am torn between 2 careers, teaching and nursing (specifically ob/gyn) I have read most of your stories, and DO NOT know what to do!!??!!! PLEASE give me advice. Is the schooling so difficult, are the hours that bad, isnt it rewarding, isnt helping others and having the knowlegde make you respect yourself, HELP ME!!!???!!!! Nursing seemed wonderful before I read this, this calling everyone keeps talking about, how do I know if I have been called. Does having dreams count!!??? I am torn, both careers are affiliated with helping people!!! PLEASE GIVE MA ANY AND ALL ADVICE!!!!!! thank you sooooooo MUCH EVERYONE!!!!!!!!!!! for your time and answers, this is for my life and I am thankful you care!!!!


    [ June 14, 2001: Message edited by: Kara ]
  7. by   Doc
    Dear Kara,

    From what I hear teaching isn't all it's cracked up to be either. Teachers are increasingly complaining of being overstretched and underpaid, and that there is so much paperwork to do that they wonder how they might manage to get through all the curriculum. Actually, there are many parallels between nursing and education.

    Look nursing can be extremely rewarding. If you are patient, compassionate and humble then you are probably suited to it. Nurses also have to be thick skinned and assertive. Those who aren't don't get very far. One of the great things about being a nurse is that some of the simplest things you can do for someone can make them so grateful. You will see so many things, learn a lot (and continue to every day), and get thank you cards and flowers from patients and their families.

    Unfortunately, nursing can also be very frustrating and as a result many of us use this board to vent our feelings and seek validation from others. It is a real part of nursing, but only a part of it - you have to take the good with the bad and decide which outweighs the other.

    There are some ob/gyn nurses on this board who can tell you about ob/gyn nursing - there is a special section on this board for that.

    As for whether nursing is a calling, I agree in principle but how you come to that realisation is very personal/individual. May I suggest you do a CNA course and work as a CNA for a while first to see how you like it. The course is quite short (5-12 weeks depending on your state) so if you decide you don't like it, you will not have invested very much time in vain. Another advantage is that nursing students are far more clinically prepared if they worked as CNAs first. You will have time management skills which most BSN/ADN students struggle with even after they have graduated. You could count your experience as a CNA as an insight into some of the basic roles of nursing and an observation of how LPNs and RNs work and interact. If this is your calling it will come to you then. Good luck!
  8. by   Nebby Nurse
    Boy I sure wish I could get on a time machine and go back to the day I decided to enter the noble profession of nursing. Oh brother, probably the biggest bone-headed blunder of my entire life! I HATE nursing and everything about it. I want out bad but I'm like a rat in a cage : go to work, come home exhausted and stressed go back to work. Is anyone else out there tired of being a SERVENT? Is anybody else angry about working every major holiday and working these beautiful summer weekends? Every day that I remain in this profession I feel like some kind of masochist. I feel like puking everytime I see an administrator or DON.. Does anyone really think that the federal government or for that manner anyone else is going to save this profession? My prediction is that the average nurse of the future will be minimally educated, less skilled and far more overworked and underpaid than the nurse of today. Nursing Stinks!!!
  9. by   HazeK
    If you love nursing...stay in it!

    If you hate nursing...please leave the field!

    If you are frustrated in your current nursing job, or are feeling 'burned out', how about trying a different facet of nursing? Not everyone has to be a bedside nurse in a hospital!!

    How about pharmacological sales? Equipment sales & inservices? Teaching? Writing?
    Heck, you could take some classes on building a website! (but it would have to be really good to beat Brian's here at allnurses.com!)
    How about sitting in a chair with your feet propped up on a cushion, doing telephone triage?

    But please, DO find a niche that brings you joy and personal satisfaction!

    Happiness!
    Haze
  10. by   Charles S. Smith, RN, MS
    Originally posted by HazeK:
    <STRONG>If you love nursing...stay in it!

    If you hate nursing...please leave the field!

    If you are frustrated in your current nursing job, or are feeling 'burned out', how about trying a different facet of nursing? Not everyone has to be a bedside nurse in a hospital!!

    How about pharmacological sales? Equipment sales & inservices? Teaching? Writing?
    Heck, you could take some classes on building a website! (but it would have to be really good to beat Brian's here at allnurses.com!)
    How about sitting in a chair with your feet propped up on a cushion, doing telephone triage?

    But please, DO find a niche that brings you joy and personal satisfaction!

    Happiness!
    Haze
    </STRONG>
    Haze...I could not agree with you more. Hate is a very strong attribute and if one is that angry about what one is doing, leave and leave fast. Staying only makes it more difficult for the rest of us who do enjoy nursing. I coach nurses who are on the verge of burnout and it is a serious problem. I find, however, that there is a way for nurses to find what truly moves them. Try coaching! As a professional coach who has been coached, the shifts one makes as a result of coaching are awesome! There is light at the end of the tunnel, so email me or check out the coaching section of our company website.

    regards
    chas
  11. by   Mikkey
    I've been an RN for 23 years (19 of them acute care med surg/icu/ccu) Then 3 years ago or so I switched to a nursing home. A very nice one with much potential where a majority of the residents can respond to you and interact with you even if only a little. It was a basic care residence, not skilled. I loved the residents!!! A great part was when they said you quit at 10pm you were home by 10:15....that hardly ever happened in the hospital. In the hospital you NEVER had enough time to do the things you were supposed to.........extremely stressful!!
    Still you give up every other weekend, every other holiday, and then some because so many people call in and you pick up the slack.
    If you have a family, nursing is not worth it, because of the all too real possibility these days of bringing home HIV and other bad things. I was lucky. An agressive pt turned on me suddenly and I got stuck with his insulin needle. Administration wasn't even going to have me tested!!! The DON told me to wash with betadine and put a band-aid on it and I'll be okay. Well, I insisted on testing because this guy had numerous surgeries with blood donations. The tests turned out okay, BUT I had to quit nursing my beautiful baby (this in a household where I did extended nursing with all my kids!), explain abstinance for 6 months to my hubby. The quitting of nursing the baby was devastating to all. I can't imagine if I had actually contracted HIV. It was too stressful a time and I wouldn't want anybody to go through that. BUT, its a real possibility and all too easy to do. The administration was just awful.
    I quit work in Dec as my dh got a new job which requires travel. I now do home sales and think eventually I will be good at it and make more money. I still visit the residents as I really loved most of them. They are special people and it seems that too many people these days "forget" their family members in their old age. Geriatric people don't get the respect they have earned.
  12. by   TERESE A. PANEBIANCO
    Why do nurses always talk about making a decent wage. The salaries in nursing are absolutely INDECENT!!!!!! One of the nurses commented that her husband made a good living, so that she could afford a low paying job in nursing. I bet that that attitude would change considerably if her husband had a low paying job, or she was the sole support of her family! Nursing salaries have not kept up with the cost of living for at least the last 10 years. The majority of us have no pension/retirement plans, and I personally know of nurses who are working into their late sixties, and seventies. They are not doing this because they love their work, or cannot bear to retire - they have no choice ! If i felt that nursing was a calling , and I didn't want to make a decent wage, i would have become a nun ! The majority of the nurses on the job who feel that there is no problem generally have some dysfunctional component to their personality. Either that, or thay have been downtrooden so long that they don't know how to stick up for themselves anymore. Shame on us for letting it get this out of hand ! The solution to the problem lies in our hands - we just have to have the courage to stand up for ourselves, and do something most nurses don't traditionlly do - stick together. We have an awesome amount of numbers and power IF we just stiick by each other !
  13. by   sline81253
    Tremmi,
    I have been a nurse for 16 yrs now and have worked in just about every setting. I definitely would not encourage others to pursue nursing as a career. The most enjoyable work I have done was in a Pediatric Clinic. Easy job, friendly staff, great docs, but low low pay. I guess it makes up for the no-nights, no weekends, no holidays. Nursing homes remind me of Nazi Death Camps. The owner lives in a mansion and the poor residents hardly have food to eat. It is just too dreadful. Home Health may allow nurses to have more 1:1 contact but where I live (rural Arkansas) it can be scary and dangerous to go way out to those needing care. It can be lonely too because there are no other nurses to talk to. I worked agency most of my career. No benefits but higher pay. No regular schedule but more freedom in scheduling work the way you want to work it. One does not have to get involved in all the squabbles and politics going on but you do not get the feeling that you are "one of them." Now I work 12 hour night shifts (shift diffs = much better pay, no doctors, etc. to fool with, less hectic) - in a geri-psych unit 3 nights a week. I wish I could get away from the paperwork and actually get to know my patients but every time we think we have a routine down pat, we get a new unit director and start all over again. For the most part I would say that the best thing about nursing is job security. "We can always get another nursing job" we say to console ourselves for not being considered a profession. Doctors seem to be getting better at respecting nurses but administration values them very little. Also maybe because most nurses are women, there just does not ever seem to be the cohesiveness that one encounters with doctors (they stick together no matter what!). Nurses are unkind to each other, making the adjustment to being fresh out of school extremely frightening and disheartening to those new on a unit. I have heard it is the only profession where they eat their young. So true......

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