How do you feel about ADN nurses? - page 8

My name is Stacy and i will be graduating in May with my ADN nursing degree. I was wondering what everyone thinks about nurses with ADN degrees? Do you think they should go on? Let me know what you... Read More

  1. by   AdvancedTheraphy
    Quote from Michele G.
    That is so not true. No matter what initals are behind our names, we all took the same test, and all of us are RN's (maybe I am smarter than a BSN nurse becasue I was able to pass the NCLEX with 2 years of education...LOL). No matter how much education any of us had, we are RN's and an RN is a PROFESSION no matter what...hence the new name REGISTERED PROFESSIONAL NURSE.

    Beware MyBlueSky I was nice, you may come accoss some others that might be very agnry with what you said!!!
    I guess since you are still a student you have a lot to learn. If you needed a minimum of a BSN degree to be a nurse, then we would be in trouble, we would have even more of a greater shortage, and healthcare would not be the same.
    Michele
    Michelle G., your comment about being smarter than BSNs because you passed NCLEX with 2 years of education is silly at best! If you think hard enough about the curriculum structure differences between the two, you would not have said that comment (even in parenthesis)! This kind of comment is reflective of the 2-year education you have.
  2. by   tfunkrn
    Quote from SmilingBluEyes
    I sometimes think people say things online they never would face to face......cause I have never heard such degrading put-downs toward others' educational choices as I have here. It's sad.
    I am happy for those that have decided to pursue their education further, but we all must not lose sight on what the main focus of Nursing really is.. The Patient. All of us have requirements for CEU's.. so we all are pursuing our education further with each class we take, and each new learning experience we encounter.
    I hope no one has taken anything I have said as degrading, because I did not mean it to be.. I try to always focus on what is best for my patients..
  3. by   boonie181@aol.com
    Dose anyone know about Luthern School of Nursing in St.Louis
  4. by   SmilingBluEyes
    I did not point to *your* saying anything, sunshine (my people are defensive here today).

    I am simply addressing your concern. I said it before; Allnurses is the only place I have heard people slam others' education levels like this. On these very boards, I have seen people actually intimate MSN's have "no common sense" , "BSN's can't handle floor nursing and have no clinical ability "......

    .....and I have seen people time and again put down ADNs as "the ones dragging the whole profession down" , or "easy to pick out from BSN's or higher". Seems to me people take license on the internet to slam one another that they likely would NOT in person----and it's got to stop here, cause it's not helping anyone. Anyhow be all that as it may.....

    I think it is high time to stop putting down each others' choices and unite and tackle larger issues. All this infighting in our ranks does nothing for our more pressing causes.
    Last edit by SmilingBluEyes on Mar 16, '05
  5. by   SmilingBluEyes
    Quote from mommyfunk
    I am happy for those that have decided to pursue their education further, but we all must not lose sight on what the main focus of Nursing really is.. The Patient. All of us have requirements for CEU's.. so we all are pursuing our education further with each class we take, and each new learning experience we encounter.
    I hope no one has taken anything I have said as degrading, because I did not mean it to be.. I try to always focus on what is best for my patients..
    I agree here...it is about the patients. And yes, all of us who are in active practice ARE expected to upgrade and improve our eduation all the time. I can't argue w/what you say here.
  6. by   SmilingBluEyes
    Quote from AdvancedTheraphy
    Michelle G., your comment about being smarter than BSNs because you passed NCLEX with 2 years of education is silly at best! If you think hard enough about the curriculum structure differences between the two, you would not have said that comment (even in parenthesis)! This kind of comment is reflective of the 2-year education you have.
    ah, as if to prove my point: here we go.......Another post insulting an entire group of ADN degree-holders in one fell swoop. THIS is what I am talking about. If you have a concern with ONE individual's comment, kindly address THAT and keep it FOCUSED on that one comment/poster---please refrain from insulting an entire group in order to make a point.
    Last edit by SmilingBluEyes on Mar 16, '05
  7. by   SmilingBluEyes
    Anyhow, back to the OP. Check out that site I posted early for information about ADN nursing and its advocacy. In case you missed it, here it is again:

    www.noadn.org
  8. by   nickola
    I have heard BSNs complain of being less prepared than either diploma or ASNs, and the best education I've obtained has been experience & a willingness to learn as opportunities arose. The hospital I worked at saw that I became ACLS/ATLS/PALS certified since 1987, they also encouraged us to obtain certifications in our speciality areas w/pay raises as incentives. (there is no incentive for advanced degrees w/our respective depts). I have also had the privilege of taking a 6 mo PACU/Critical Care course, and was chosen to be sent to a larger teaching hospital for an OR Circulator course offered for experienced RNs; I was then utilized in the OR as well as PACU/ASU/Pre-Admission Screening. I originally started college as an English major, (under pressure by my advisors b/c I was an english honors student) but switched to nursing. I lack a few classes towards my BSN (Western Civ, Statistics, some literature course)- yet nothing would be as helpful & pertinent to what I do as the options offered & paid for by the hospitals I've worked at- although I should add that they do have a good tuition reimbursement program. My advice to anyone questioning whether to go on to obtain the BSN is do it part time while working & gaining expertise as an RN- and take any opportunity you can to further your goals- a good nurse IS a professional- those hung up on what "degree" you have are truly ignorant & have lost sight of the big picture. Good Luck!

    Quote from rosebud5
    This debate has been going on since BSN programs started. I am an RN (diploma school) with almost 30 years of clinical experience(in patient and ambulatory care). In that time I have come to realize that the "BEST" nurses are those whose use the education they have had to the best of their ability for the good of the patient. A million dollar education from the best school in the country doesn't guarantee the smartest or best prepared nurse. As a professional organization we will NEVER gain the respect or recognition we deserve untill we stop fighting and debating among ourselves. Nursing education should always grow and respond to the changing needs of a population and not rely on who or what deems a Professional. We are professional by virtue of our license not by what program we attended.
  9. by   Michele G.
    Quote from AdvancedTheraphy
    Michelle G., your comment about being smarter than BSNs because you passed NCLEX with 2 years of education is silly at best! If you think hard enough about the curriculum structure differences between the two, you would not have said that comment (even in parenthesis)! This kind of comment is reflective of the 2-year education you have.

    I meant it to be silly, it was a joke, that is why I put LOL after it. I was just trying to get a point accross, since some people think they are better and smarter than me because they have a BSN, I was just trying to defend my self. I feel it doesn't matter if you went to college or not, it comes down to what you know, and experience... for all I know someone who didnt even graduate high school could also be smarter than me, but doesnt give the right to constantly rub it in my face and tell me that I am not a good nurse or I don't know what I am doing, or not qualified enough because I only have a ASN. If you read all my previous posts, you will see that I feel no matter what degree you have, it really depends on the individual, the schools we came from, and the experience we have, and that's what makes us a good nurse, it doesnt matter if you have a BSN or ASN. Having a BSN doesnt make that person any better than anyone else, we are equals, we are all RN's, we all took the same test, and we all need to work together, we all balance eachother out, and are supposed to be a team. Also for your information I did have more than 2 years of education. I'm soory but I think you took it the wrong way. Now you are the one being a little rude with your last comment, and this is the kind of stuff us ASN's have to deal with and try to defend ourselves against, and it should not be that way....Once again WE ARE ALL RN'S, it doesnt matter what degree we have, we all worked hard to become an RN. I dont know how many times I have to say it!!
    Thanks
    Michele
    Last edit by Michele G. on Mar 16, '05
  10. by   kenni
    okay, I'm still a little new to this, but what's up with the rude remarks? we are all adults, why can't we just respect other people's education and comments? yes, this topic has been on here for a while, but I enjoy reading what others have to say about it. I'm going after my second bachelor's degree (obviously in nursing) and I honestly want to know if my extra time, effort, and money were all worth it. besides, if you don't want to see another one you don't have to reply it.

  11. by   alayong
    ADN is great, but you need to go on with your BSN to have more nursing opportunities aside from bedside. Having a BSN will open many more doors and you will get the respect that all nurses deserve. I has an ADN for 26 years before I went back to school. I just got the BSN and starting the MSN in two weeks. At work many new nurses were getting paid more than I, because they had a BSN. Many years of experience was ignored when it came to pay. After all getting the BSN was not difficult.
  12. by   tamar2007
    Quote from betsrn
    your goals should help you with that decision. from a clinical standpoint, i think an adn grad is far better off when starting out because they have far stronger clinical skills than their bsn counterparts. after a year, though, you cannot tell them apart. some people have it and some don't. your hospital will probably pay for you to continue for your bsn. good luck.

    please elaborate on 'some people have it and some don't' i always think about that - so what if i get all a's and everything - what if "i don't have it" - please as an experienced rn help me understand what is included in this "it" and if there's any way i can get a feeling now as a student if i have it or not so i don't find that out in 2 years after i went through all this..... :uhoh21:
  13. by   MyBlueSky
    well... I'm not a nurse yet... but it's just a calling that some poeple have to helping others. If you feel that you can dedicate your life to helping other people over your own personal gains then you might have something in the health care field. I was a computer engineering major the first semester and I liked it but I felt there was something missing... I didn't want to be designing a processor or a computer program while there are people out there who need help. Maybe you should try volunteering at a hospital or do community service and see how you like it.
    I don't really think anyone can truly define "it" Heck I might end up not even being a nurse... There's something about being a male in the nursing field that's still holding me back, and the amount of hostility I just received from some people certainly didn't help, but we'll see... everyone is different I'm sure you'll figure it out soon enough... Good luck!
    Last edit by MyBlueSky on Mar 16, '05

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