How do you feel about ADN nurses? - page 6

My name is Stacy and i will be graduating in May with my ADN nursing degree. I was wondering what everyone thinks about nurses with ADN degrees? Do you think they should go on? Let me know what you... Read More

  1. by   queenrn2000@yahoo.co
    Quote from Stacy W
    My name is Stacy and i will be graduating in May with my ADN nursing degree. I was wondering what everyone thinks about nurses with ADN degrees? Do you think they should go on? Let me know what you all think.
    I have been an LPN and now an RN for over 30 years,, have worked in many fields and positions,, my experience has been, give me an ADN over a BSN new grad any day,, they have much more experience and don't come to their jobs with a big chip on their shoulders. After about 2 yrs,, they all either make it or break it. And as for the rude insult over how people talk and you think you can tell if they have an ADN or BSN.. I have known people with Doctrates, Masters, etc,, who verbal and writting skills are totally inadequate. Good luck in your nursing career. Depending on the type of nursing you want, depends on your education. But many many places do not differ, we ALL had to pass the same dang test...
  2. by   Michele G.
    Quote from SmilingBluEyes
    Well, I am sorry you don't like it----- but that much is true. You cannot achieve the clinical experiences in ONE year you can in two or 3. That is just how it is. And yes, clinical experiences DO matter, a LOT. So yes, they are less-experienced than the generic BSN or ADN is. That is how it is. It's not an attack, just a truth. NO one said it's not something that cannot be overcome, it can. But it's the truth that the accelerated BSN comes out MUCH less experienced clinically than the generic one.

    I dont know what you are talking about, because I did have 2 years of clinical experience, and I dont have a BSN. Also, in Florida the BSN program only gave their students 1 year of clinical experience, and they were only on the floor for 4 hours 2x a week, in my program we were on the floors for atleast 8 hours sometimes full shifts (12hrs) 2-3 times a week. I know of some people who wished they went to my school instead of the BSN school, because we did learn more, and the school was well known for it's nursing program. All the hospitals we went to, the nurses rather have a student from our school than one from the BSN school, taking care of their patients. I worked with some BSN students who just don't know as much as the ASN nurses, so it really comes down to experience!!!
    I know so many people who did not graduate from college and are 10x smarter than people with BSN and Master degrees, and that is becasue they worked 10x harder and have more experience, since they have been working since they were teenagers. I have a friend who has a BSN degree in education and going for her masters, and I really hate to say it, but she is not the smartest person around, she is very nieve and has no street smarts. I also have a friend who is a Medical Assistant, who has been doing it for many years, and she sometimes knows more than I do. Once again, it is not about how much education you have, it all comes down to EXPERIENCE!!!

    Michele
  3. by   rosebud5
    This debate has been going on since BSN programs started. I am an RN (diploma school) with almost 30 years of clinical experience(in patient and ambulatory care). In that time I have come to realize that the "BEST" nurses are those whose use the education they have had to the best of their ability for the good of the patient. A million dollar education from the best school in the country doesn't guarantee the smartest or best prepared nurse. As a professional organization we will NEVER gain the respect or recognition we deserve untill we stop fighting and debating among ourselves. Nursing education should always grow and respond to the changing needs of a population and not rely on who or what deems a Professional. We are professional by virtue of our license not by what program we attended.
    Quote from Tommybabe
    This whole "associate versus bachelor's" issue is dividing nurses apart. The assumption seems to be that associate nurses are only taking nursing courses, when that's not the case at all. At my school, nursing students have to take two english classes, history, two social science classes, math, and physical education, in addition to the three science classes for the nursing degree. And that's on top of the two years of nursing classes. That's not two years worth of liberal arts, but will a couple more literature and philosophy classes really make a difference in the way nurses perform their jobs? Not all of us can afford to go to four-year schools for a bachelor's degree, and since many nurses with associate degrees pass the same NCLEX exam, and are able to get hired, why shouldn't some nurses opt for an associate degree? If others want to get a bachelor's degree, then that's great for them, too. I know many nurses with "only" an associate degree, and they never had any problems getting a job, and are quite well-rounded.
  4. by   Michele G.
    Quote from Namaste4All
    :hatparty:
    Well, I wasn't around the first time this thread went around so I'd like to put my two cents in now.

    1) You shouldn't care about what people think of the letters after your name as much as your ability. Certainly, if you feel that you have more to learn (and there always is) then go about it in any manner available. There are plenty of opportunities to continue learning without official education.

    2) I have many friends with BSN's and ADn's. The BSN's have all expressed feeling LESS prepared for the floor. They were full of theory but didn't get the clinical experience they had expected and felt very uneasy when they began their careers (as most nurses do).

    3) You only get out of the program what you put into it. In my classes (ADN) there are people with masters degrees (including myself) and bachleors degrees. Some folks with other masters degrees are total slackers just getting by and don't really care. The top student in our class has no other college experience, but has the books memorized, a great bedside manner, and a sincere committment to being the best RN with an ADN or BSN.

    4) I have experienced a lot of different nurses as teachers on the floor. I have seen great nurses with ADN's and great nurses with BSN's. I have also seen BSN's be total slackers and tell the students, "you won't need all that book stuff (pathophys) down the road, so don't stress on it." I have seen the best and worst in both ADN's and BSN's. I have to say that the best floor nurse I have worked with, the most knowledgeable, and the best teacher was indeed an ADN.

    Sorry for the poor grammer and/ or spelling. I was never very good at that. Although I do have a masters and I have written many scientific papers I always had friends edit them for me. That's the professional thing to do. I probably use the wrong fork for my salads too. I have spent more time being certain that I have the right needle and med instead.

    Going for my M.S.N.
    I agree...well put. Thank You

    Michele
  5. by   MyBlueSky
    ADNs are one of the reasons nursing cannot be considered a profession
    I agree with the ANA in that the BSN should be the minimum level of education.
    Last edit by MyBlueSky on Mar 16, '05
  6. by   Michele G.
    Quote from MyBlueSky
    ADNs are one of the reasons nursing cannot be considered a profession
    That is so not true. No matter what initals are behind our names, we all took the same test, and all of us are RN's (maybe I am smarter than a BSN nurse becasue I was able to pass the NCLEX with 2 years of education...LOL). No matter how much education any of us had, we are RN's and an RN is a PROFESSION no matter what...hence the new name REGISTERED PROFESSIONAL NURSE.

    Beware MyBlueSky I was nice, you may come accoss some others that might be very agnry with what you said!!!
    I guess since you are still a student you have a lot to learn. If you needed a minimum of a BSN degree to be a nurse, then we would be in trouble, we would have even more of a greater shortage, and healthcare would not be the same.
    Michele
    Last edit by Michele G. on Mar 16, '05
  7. by   Marie_LPN, RN
    Quote from MyBlueSky
    ADNs are one of the reasons nursing cannot be considered a profession
    You DO have actual evidence, links, research, etc. to PROVE this, right??


    I agree with the ANA in that the BSN should be the minimum level of education.
    I get the distinct impression you have that degree already.


    I swear, i think the MAIN issue with the degrees is some of the opinions of those that already have the BSNs. Not all, but SOME.
    Last edit by Marie_LPN, RN on Mar 16, '05
  8. by   MyBlueSky
    No I'm currently a nursing student at a university. I am not degrading ADNs at all! I'm just saying the ana for 40 years now has been pushing for the BSN to be the entry level nursing degree.
    Let me define the qualifications for a profession:
    Higher education
    Vital to human welfare
    Autonomous
    Code of Ethics
    Entry level education
    Service over personal gain
    Adequate Compensation
    ------------
    Now nurisng meets most of these qualifications except two: entry level education and autonomous.
    Professions have at least 4 years of college education which nursing does not.
    ----------
    Nursing is NOT officially a profession.
    It is a professional career.
    ----------
    I think you all have the misconception that I don't think adns are qualified that is not the case. I have much respect for all nurses i was just pointing out that fact

    ---------
    Please Michele G. Don't degrade or belittle anyone because you were able to pass the nclex with 2 years of education. You are one person, everyone is different. Some people are just bad test takers...
    Last edit by MyBlueSky on Mar 16, '05
  9. by   tfunkrn
    Quote from *PICURN*
    ROTFL!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    i didn't know they had a BSN course on "talking to medical professionals"....damn should have taken that one....
    I have known for quite some time you need to take a Bull Sh#t Nicely course before talking to other medical professionals.. ROTFLMAO!!
    (Don't hate me too much.. I just joined the forum)
  10. by   tfunkrn
    Quote from MyBlueSky
    ADNs are one of the reasons nursing cannot be considered a profession
    I agree with the ANA in that the BSN should be the minimum level of education.
    Then I guess you wouldn't mind handling both yours and my patient loads?
  11. by   gwlillith
    Quote from MyBlueSky
    ADNs are one of the reasons nursing cannot be considered a profession
    I agree with the ANA in that the BSN should be the minimum level of education.
    So you're saying my ASN degree doesn't make me a professional?

    I think you should wait a while before you start making those kind of observations and conclusions. At least until you finish your education. I'm sure there are several, including myself, ASN's that could nurse circles around you!

    You asked for it!
  12. by   MyBlueSky
    Quote from elizzy
    So you're saying my ASN degree doesn't make me a professional?

    I think you should wait a while before you start making those kind of observations and conclusions. At least until you finish your education. I'm sure there are several, including myself, ASN's that could nurse circles around you!

    You asked for it!
    why does everyone see me as the enemy here?
    I was just simply stating THE FACT that nursing is NOT officially recognized as a profession because they do not meet the criteria because of the associate degree program. Why is that so hard to accept?
    I never said that I think ADNS are less qualified or never meant anything malicious by saying that. Can you find a line where I stated that I think ADNS are not professionals, made an attack on ADNS, or they said are less qualified? You are the ones who are attacking me for just stating pure facts. Why are all of the ADNS becoming so defensive all of a sudden?
    Last edit by MyBlueSky on Mar 16, '05
  13. by   tfunkrn
    Quote from MyBlueSky
    No I'm currently a nursing student at a university. I am not degrading ADNs at all! I'm just saying the ana for 40 years now has been pushing for the BSN to be the entry level nursing degree.
    Let me define the qualifications for a profession:
    Higher education
    Vital to human welfare
    Autonomous
    Code of Ethics
    Entry level education
    Service over personal gain
    Adequate Compensation
    ------------
    Now nurisng meets most of these qualifications except two: entry level education and autonomous.
    Professions have at least 4 years of college education which nursing does not.
    I beg to differ with the education aspect.. How is taking a few more courses in humanities going to make me more 'professional' or 'autonomous'?
    May I offer you a piece of advice, since you are a nursing student working on your BSN? One of the main things I have seen, that have put many patients in jeopordy, is the Graduate BSN (and a few ADN's) that fails to ask questions when in doubt from the experienced RN mentor (that very well may be a BSN or an ADN).. They are afraid that it makes them look 'stupid'.. This is definitely not the case.. There are times I will question an order and bounce it off of one of my colleages. Remember one thing.. Just because a Physician orders something, you are held just as liable for carrying out an order that is potentially dangerous to the patient.. (I work in a teaching hospital)

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