How do you feel about ADN nurses? - page 2

My name is Stacy and i will be graduating in May with my ADN nursing degree. I was wondering what everyone thinks about nurses with ADN degrees? Do you think they should go on? Let me know what you... Read More

  1. by   live4today
    Quote from stacy w
    my name is stacy and i will be graduating in may with my adn nursing degree. i was wondering what everyone thinks about nurses with adn degrees? do you think they should go on? let me know what you all think.
    well....i am an adn nurse, and i think we're the best!!! :hatparty:

    i can be as prejudice as i want about adns because we still make up the largest population of nurses in our country!

    should any degreed nurse continue their education? of course they should if that is what they wish to do for their own educational reasons.

    let us know when you pass your boards so we can congratulate you! may your journey be successful no matter whether you choose to pursue more nursing education or not!
  2. by   robynhood
    Quote from The Veridican
    Where I work, you don't know which nurses are ADNs or BSNs because it's not on our name badges. But in reality, as soon as you talk to someone on the floor, you can tell whether they've had two years or four years of education.
    [
    Puleeeze!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! I have never heard such a comment. I have been an RN for 6 months and an LVN for 12 years and not once has anybody ever mentioned that they could tell how much education I had by the way I talked. Doctors and staff who do not know me personally have always assumed I was an RN and I never tried to hide the fact I was not. However, I can tell you I was able to tell a couple of nurses were BSN's at the last hospital I worked at. They were all from the latest batch of grads and the four letter words that came out of their mouths showed me that a four year degree does not guarantee class.
    Enough said.
  3. by   live4today
    Quote from the veridican

    i don't think a bsn is necessary, but i do feel a nurse should have a bachelors degree in some field so they are educated enough to converse intelligently with the other members of the healthcare team (doctors, administrators, pts, ots, rts, other nurses, etc.)............................................. .........................

    where i work, you don't know which nurses are adns or bsns because it's not on our name badges. but in reality, as soon as you talk to someone on the floor, you can tell whether they've had two years or four years of education.

    just my two cents.

    veridican
    veridican....your "two cents" comments as stated above have an extremely narrow minded view -- not to mention being very judgemental on top of it all.


    i have never been able to tell what college degree a person has or doesn't have based on how they talk or express themselves, and i've worked with many people across the united states and overseas who have anywhere from a grade school education to a doctorate's degree.

    where do you get off putting people down this way!!! :angryfire
    Last edit by live4today on Mar 2, '05
  4. by   DDRN4me
    Quote from tntrn
    i would think that even the adn nurses (she said with a wink, since she is one) have developed that sacred critical thinking art. don't we do that automatically as we go about our work? of course, it comes with experience. it can't be learned in a classroom.

    as far as only bsn nurses being to carry on an intelligent conversation with other professionals: what hogwash, and i cleaned up my initial reaction to that one. what an elitist way to think. is that an attitude that is taught while you're in bsn school? in my 28 years of experience, i find that i cannot distinguish the adn's from the bsn's during conversation. indeed, some of the younger bsn's i've known recently cannot spell, cannot pronounce drug names properly and in general are interested in partying more than anything else.

    so we all have our experiences...and hopefully those who don't respect adn's hopefully will have occasion to re-evaluate after actually having had some.
    :hatparty: :yeahthat: couldnt have said that better myself...adn after 18 years as an lpn, now in school for my bachelors because i want to, not because it will make me a better nurse...bsn is mostly theory and extraneous bs!
  5. by   Dixielee
    Well, how do you feel about Catholic nurses? Or diabetic nurses? Or single nurses?

    Will we EVER get over this problem? As long as a nurse can pass the NCLEX, perform at a safe level and give quality care, who gives a rip what their background may be? In my ER we have over 100 nurses on the schedule. I can tell you the educational background of 3 of them, and I only know this because they are all in school now. As for competence, some I work with are great, and some are mediocre. I can't believe I am even responding to this.
  6. by   Claver
    I feel compelled to respond and then I feel why bother?. If as nurses we are going to have this old argument when NO MATTER WHAT DEGREE - WE ALL HAVE TO PASS THE SAME STATE BOARDS!!!!!
  7. by   jeepgirl
    Quote from DutchgirlRN
    :deadhorse Sorry couldn't resist, I've been looking for an opportunity to use this dead horse !

    While on the dead horse subject..... I'd like to use it for the "NCLEX- Help I think I failed", "Shut off at 265 I know I failed", "Shut off at 75 I'm convinced I failed". I don't mean to sound crass but doesn't anyone ever search the site first before getting panic stricken?
    I'm snorting because I'm laughing so hard right now.
  8. by   jeepgirl
    Quote from The Veridican
    R.N. is the only profession I know of that allows you to be considered one of the "learned professions" with only having completed an associate degree, and more often in the past, a diploma program.

    People make a lot out of the BSN, but if it were the minimum entrance degree for nursing, we wouldn't have 1/2 the nurses we have. I don't think a BSN is necessary, but I do feel a nurse should have a bachelors degree in some field so they are educated enough to converse intelligently with the other members of the healthcare team (doctors, administrators, PTs, OTs, RTs, other nurses, etc.).

    I am one of the rare individuals that believes a bachelors should be required before admission to nursing school, and nursing school should award a masters degree. The only problem is that no one would want to work at the bedside then.

    Where I work, you don't know which nurses are ADNs or BSNs because it's not on our name badges. But in reality, as soon as you talk to someone on the floor, you can tell whether they've had two years or four years of education.

    Just my two cents.

    Veridican
    Yeah, because I communicate using a system of grunts and hand gestures to talk to the doctors as it is.
  9. by   gerry79
    I guess this debate will never end. At times I wonder what the complaint would be if a bachelors degree were the standard education needed to become a nurse. Would there then be a battle of the specialties (Medsurg vs ED vs ICU)? How can nurses ever gain the respect they deserve in the medical community, when there is no unified front. There are good and bad nurses from every educational discipline.The commonality should lie with the two leters that mean the most...RN. I am not yet a nurse, but was lead to believe that the common enemies of nursing were poor patient ratios, poor management, and greedy corporate hospitals. Not a few extra letters on a name badge.
  10. by   Marie_LPN, RN
    I think ADN nurses are **** good nurses.


    It's the nurses with the holier-than-thou airs that needs more education.
  11. by   Marie_LPN, RN
    Where I work, you don't know which nurses are ADNs or BSNs because it's not on our name badges. But in reality, as soon as you talk to someone on the floor, you can tell whether they've had two years or four years of education.

    I'm curious, which one sounded smarter? LOL!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
  12. by   SmilingBluEyes
    Quote from Marie_LPN
    I'm curious, which one sounded smarter? LOL!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
    ROFLMAO!!! what a ridiculous comment, huh.
  13. by   Euskadi1946
    Quote from Dixielee
    Well, how do you feel about Catholic nurses? Or diabetic nurses? Or single nurses?

    Will we EVER get over this problem? As long as a nurse can pass the NCLEX, perform at a safe level and give quality care, who gives a rip what their background may be? In my ER we have over 100 nurses on the schedule. I can tell you the educational background of 3 of them, and I only know this because they are all in school now. As for competence, some I work with are great, and some are mediocre. I can't believe I am even responding to this.
    Girl did you hit the nail on the head. I worked my tail off in an ADN program at a junior college that prides itself on graduating excellent nurses and has 100% passing rate on NCLEX. That to me was my feather in my cap and I'm going to toot my own horn and state that when I did floor nursing, I gave my patients' the best care possible under grueling staffing situations. Nursing is what you make of it regardless of the degree. Bottom line, its about giving patients the best care possible.

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