How do you feel about ADN nurses? - page 11

My name is Stacy and i will be graduating in May with my ADN nursing degree. I was wondering what everyone thinks about nurses with ADN degrees? Do you think they should go on? Let me know what you... Read More

  1. by   frogdog
    Quote from SmilingBluEyes
    another one who thinks all 2 year nurses sound the same....sheesh.

    Someone needs to remind you all there is more than ONE way to "round" oneself or self-educate. How insulting.

    I agree, it is insulting to generalize that a person without a bachelors in something is less intelligent or learned.

    I have two bachelors, the first in liberal arts. It was useless except it allowed me to get my foot in the door to a real profession (counseling/social services). The second is in nursing. I would have gone for the ADN had there not been an accelerated BSN program at the local university.

    I have met nurses with the 4-year and nurses with the 2-year, and from what I've seen it's all about the individual as to whether or not they are professional...it's not about the degree.

    However, I very much support getting the BSN for the following reason: It helps to professionalize the field; this means higher salaries and generally more respect from other health care professionals.

    Personally, I have appreciated being fortunate enough to get the degrees I've gotten. I'm not disciplined to learn everything on my own. My next door neighbor has no degrees and is much more learned than me. It's really up to the person as to motivation to learn. I encourage everyone to get as much formal education as they can and as fast as they can because it simply opens up one's options.
  2. by   RN&MOM2Girls
    Quote from Stacy W
    My name is Stacy and i will be graduating in May with my ADN nursing degree. I was wondering what everyone thinks about nurses with ADN degrees? Do you think they should go on? Let me know what you all think.
    Good for you I am always glad to hear that we are getting new members to our profession!!! I am however very saddened after reading some of the coments by others regarding the degree differences. We are all working for the good of our patients or our residents (LTC facilities), I am probably out of the norm...with this but I graduated from a BSN program in '99, however I don't feel that because I have that degree that I am a "Better Nurse" than someone who has a ADN or LPN, I realize that I have short falls, and that just because I have my BSN doesn't mean that I know more or am more experienced because of it.
    If I had to go back and do it all again I would have probably just done a 2 year RN program, for the simple fact that with my BSN I am more prone to be a "paper nurse", which is not what I want to do...it took me 5 years to even take my boards, because I really wanted to be in patient care, and on the floor, but was afraid that I wouldn't be because of my degree... how wrong I was! I have since learned that I can work the floor because there are nurses out there that enjoy doing the paper work, I do however feel that they need to work the floor occasionally so that they really know the residents needs.
    Well anyway, I applaud you for finishing your degree, only you will be able to tell if you need to go on. In my opinion, we are all "NURSES" who cares what the letters are before or after your degree!!!
  3. by   adboehnen
    I have my BSN. I went to school directly for it. In my personal practice, I have run across ADNs that are very smart, wonderful nurses. All nurses should be valued as an asset to society and a healthcare team. If you wish to go on for your BSN, that may give you more options in the future, and you'll inevitably learn more for your practice as you continue your studies. It depends on what your goals are, if you're comfortable where you are or not, etc. I am the type of person who always wants to keep going with my career, and I'm going back to school to be a nurse practitioner. I tend to think about the increased options more schooling will render me. Nursing is a terrific profession, and you can't go wrong at any level underneath its wings.
  4. by   LolaJay
    :lol_hitti :lol_hitti It seems you could be a bit out of touch with reality saying something that only leaves the door open for attack. Stating a nurse should have a bachlors degree to take care of patients is flabbergasting to say the least. There are many cultures in the medical care scene where I work. I dont know how anyone could determine someone has a bachlors degree by speaking with them when we have doctors from saudi arabia, egypt, iran, austria as well as nurses, secretaries, RRT's, and the list goes on. A bachor's degree is a great thing, however, I dont see how anyone could possibly separate an ADN prepared nurse vs a BSN nurse by communicating. Good and bad is everywhere, Nursing encompasses all walks of life, a different set of circumstances. In my unit there are two Phillipino nurses, that must pass NCLEX here. In their country they were Doctors, however a huge language barrier is in existance and also a whole new routine that must be adapted. How they functioned and how they were educated in the Phillipines is completely different than the formal education here. They are more educated than a BSN here, however try to determine that when you receive report on your patient.
    I feel from my 13 years experience, the most important thing that is of utmost importance, is understanding the nursing process and be able to apply that to care, also having excellent clinical skills, and be able to constantly stay two steps ahead, is nothing a BSN is going to magically give you. When the heat is on, noone is standing back evaluating your ability to do statistics, or how you did in your abnormal psychology class. It has been very clear to me, for a long time, one of the reasons nursing hasnt been regarded as a Profession is due to the fact we are our own worst enemies and have no problem desimating one of our own. If only BSN programs were in existance, I sit and realize all of the talent nursing would do without. Not everyone has the BSN time line, some are single mothers, or dont have 4 years of their lives to put on hold to get through all this....However as I sit here, pondering, i realize you must certainly be lacking in being openminded and seeing the whole global picture. You seem to find comfort in your "local" closeminded very critical comments. You must have never "DUG IN" the anals of nursing and seen the "whole picture"
    Next time at work, I'll take a moment and look at all the nurses and be thankful to have the talent and expertise, when a patient life is dependent upon their ability to think, and realizing most of them are ADN prepared. I only hope you see your degregation of this moral highground and rescind your very closeminded "STATEMENT of FACTS" If tomorrow it was announced nurses now have a "PROFESSION" it may make you feel a little good as you treck into work, but at the end of the day,..what does it mean? Lastly, perhaps this would be the identity you need to feel good about yourself?
    I just had to reiterate this,,.....While at a recertification class for ACLS, two masters prepared RN's raised their hands during review, to ask the instructor what the heimlech manuever was again? Gosh, this "communication" surely showed their masters level preparation and left that instructor most likely ready to rally to make nursing a profession, Im sure hands down!!!! :smiley_ab
    Last edit by LolaJay on Mar 18, '05 : Reason: ad text
  5. by   LolaJay
    Quote from rsqme


    Please! How arrogant you sound. I do not believe that you can tell how many years of nursing school a nurse has had by talking to them. Inflation is great, and your two cents isn't worth much. Dedicated, caring, intelligent, nurses are abundant in the nursing population. It may be the LVN, LPN, ADN, BSN, or MSN. Most of us chose nursing because we care about people and wanted to make a difference. I have talked to doctors that didn't sound as intelligent as some of the people I work on the floor with, from the diet department to administration. I have also talked to some doctors that are very intelligent, and compassionate.
    Try not to be so judgmental. We are all there for one purpose.
    Look at the whole picture!

    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    It seems you could be a bit out of touch with reality saying something that only leaves the door open for attack. Stating a nurse should have a bachlors degree to take care of patients is flabbergasting to say the least. There are many cultures in the medical care scene where I work. I dont know how anyone could determine someone has a bachlors degree by speaking with them when we have doctors from saudi arabia, egypt, iran, austria as well as nurses, secretaries, RRT's, and the list goes on. A bachor's degree is a great thing, however, I dont see how anyone could possibly separate an ADN prepared nurse vs a BSN nurse by communicating. Good and bad is everywhere, Nursing encompasses all walks of life, a different set of circumstances. In my unit there are two Phillipino nurses, that must pass NCLEX here. In their country they were Doctors, however a huge language barrier is in existance and also a whole new routine that must be adapted. How they functioned and how they were educated in the Phillipines is completely different than the formal education here. They are more educated than a BSN here, however try to determine that when you receive report on your patient.
    I feel from my 13 years experience, the most important thing that is of utmost importance, is understanding the nursing process and be able to apply that to care, also having excellent clinical skills, and be able to constantly stay two steps ahead, is nothing a BSN is going to magically give you. When the heat is on, noone is standing back evaluating your ability to do statistics, or how you did in your abnormal psychology class. It has been very clear to me, for a long time, one of the reasons nursing hasnt been regarded as a Profession is due to the fact we are our own worst enemies and have no problem desimating one of our own. If only BSN programs were in existance, I sit and realize all of the talent nursing would do without. Not everyone has the BSN time line, some are single mothers, or dont have 4 years of their lives to put on hold to get through all this....However as I sit here, pondering, i realize you must certainly be lacking in being openminded and seeing the whole global picture. You seem to find comfort in your "local" closeminded very critical comments. You must have never "DUG IN" the anals of nursing and seen the "whole picture"
    Next time at work, I'll take a moment and look at all the nurses and be thankful to have the talent and expertise, when a patient life is dependent upon their ability to think, and realizing most of them are ADN prepared. I only hope you see your degregation of this moral highground and rescind your very closeminded "STATEMENT of FACTS" If tomorrow it was announced nurses now have a "PROFESSION" it may make you feel a little good as you treck into work, but at the end of the day,..what does it mean? Lastly, perhaps this would be the identity you need to feel good about yourself?
    I just had to reiterate this,,.....While at a recertification class for ACLS, two masters prepared RN's raised their hands during review, to ask the instructor what the heimlech manuever was again? Gosh, this "communication" surely showed their masters level preparation and left that instructor most likely ready to rally to make nursing a profession, Im sure hands down!!!!
  6. by   adboehnen
    Whoa! Calm down. If you read what I wrote, I said that I know many ADNs that are wonderful, smart nurses. I agree that a degree does not necessarily differentiate people based on capabilities and smartness. I told the originator of this topic that she should continue school if that is what she aspires. You cannot disagree that more training will result in more knowledge. As with anything, whatever a person chooses to do with their education, circumstances, natural capabilites, etc will all affect the end results of one's talents. Read more carefully before jumping to the defense.

    Additionally, nursing is noted as a profession. I'm not sure who told you that it wasn't. It is one of the most respected professions, and it has been polled as one of the most trusted in recent years!
    Last edit by adboehnen on Mar 18, '05
  7. by   LolaJay
    Quote from adboehnen
    Whoa! Calm down. If you read what I wrote, I said that I know many ADNs that are wonderful, smart nurses. I agree that a degree does not necessarily differentiate people based on capabilities and smartness. I told the originator of this topic that she should continue school if that is what she aspires. You cannot disagree that more training will result in more knowledge. As with anything, whatever a person chooses to do with their education, circumstances, natural capabilites, etc will all affect the end results of one's talents. Read more carefully before jumping to the defense.

    Additionally, nursing is noted as a profession. I'm not sure who told you that it wasn't. It is one of the most respected professions, and it has been polled as one of the most trusted in recent years!
    I think somehow my "reply" was posted in error to you. I was replying to a topic stating that RN's should be bachlored prepared and this was easy to decipher when speaking to an ADN RN vs a BSN, Im sorry. I will show you the original topic location and you may be intrested.
  8. by   LolaJay
    Quote from MobetterRN2
    There are people who do not have even one year of college that know how to converse with others. I know several. ( Housekeepers, Diet aides,
    volunteers at the hosptial, laundry workers, etc.) I know it is your opinion,
    but I think you better be careful. You may insult someone at your place of work.
    Can you tell I have an ADN or BSN by the way I am writing this reply?
    This is in reply to The Verdican's statement or opinion on the "learned profession" of nursing. I dont stand alone in my belief that if ongoing learning isnt occurring, then stagnation is,..
    Look at the whole picture! :smiley_ab

    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    It seems you could be a bit out of touch with reality saying something that only leaves the door open for attack. Stating a nurse should have a bachlors degree to take care of patients is flabbergasting to say the least. There are many cultures in the medical care scene where I work. I dont know how anyone could determine someone has a bachlors degree by speaking with them when we have doctors from saudi arabia, egypt, iran, austria as well as nurses, secretaries, RRT's, and the list goes on. A bachor's degree is a great thing, however, I dont see how anyone could possibly separate an ADN prepared nurse vs a BSN nurse by communicating. Good and bad is everywhere, Nursing encompasses all walks of life, a different set of circumstances. In my unit there are two Phillipino nurses, that must pass NCLEX here. In their country they were Doctors, however a huge language barrier is in existance and also a whole new routine that must be adapted. How they functioned and how they were educated in the Phillipines is completely different than the formal education here. They are more educated than a BSN here, however try to determine that when you receive report on your patient.
    I feel from my 13 years experience, the most important thing that is of utmost importance, is understanding the nursing process and be able to apply that to care, also having excellent clinical skills, and be able to constantly stay two steps ahead, is nothing a BSN is going to magically give you. When the heat is on, noone is standing back evaluating your ability to do statistics, or how you did in your abnormal psychology class. It has been very clear to me, for a long time, one of the reasons nursing hasnt been regarded as a Profession is due to the fact we are our own worst enemies and have no problem desimating one of our own. If only BSN programs were in existance, I sit and realize all of the talent nursing would do without. Not everyone has the BSN time line, some are single mothers, or dont have 4 years of their lives to put on hold to get through all this....However as I sit here, pondering, i realize you must certainly be lacking in being openminded and seeing the whole global picture. You seem to find comfort in your "local" closeminded very critical comments. You must have never "DUG IN" the anals of nursing and seen the "whole picture"
    Next time at work, I'll take a moment and look at all the nurses and be thankful to have the talent and expertise, when a patient life is dependent upon their ability to think, and realizing most of them are ADN prepared. I only hope you see your degregation of this moral highground and rescind your very closeminded "STATEMENT of FACTS" If tomorrow it was announced nurses now have a "PROFESSION" it may make you feel a little good as you treck into work, but at the end of the day,..what does it mean? Lastly, perhaps this would be the identity you need to feel good about yourself?
    I just had to reiterate this,,.....While at a recertification class for ACLS, two masters prepared RN's raised their hands during review, to ask the instructor what the heimlech manuever was again? Gosh, this "communication" surely showed their masters level preparation and left that instructor most likely ready to rally to make nursing a profession, Im sure hands down!!!! :roll :roll
  9. by   fayray
    Dear Stacy W,

    This posting has most certainly opened the doors to numerous opinions. Let me add my opinion and then some facts. I am a Master's prepared nurse with 20 years of bedside (mainly ICU) experience. I started out as an aide, went on to nursing school (BSN) and then later finally finished my Master's. My experience and opinion is that you are a professional when you come to work, do your very best, give good care, present yourself appropriately EVEN WHEN YOU DON'T FEEL LIKE IT AND WOULD RATHER BE DOING SOMETHING ELSE. That's my definition of a professional, no matter what degree you have. Now, those of you who are posting that ADN's have more clinical are not well informed, so let me inform you. I have also taught at the ADN and BSN level and there is little difference in the number of clinical hours each program has BECAUSE these hours are dictated by the NLN and the state accrediting bodies. The number of clincal hours to didactic hours (hours in the classroom) is controlled very closely by these regulatory bodies and if your program is accredited you CAN NOT go beyond the established number of clinical hours to didactic, or you compromise your program's accreditation status. Been there, done that. So please be aware that when you are posting that you FEEL or THINK that ADN's/ASN's have more clinical hours, you are probably not being factual because in reality they simply do not have more clinical hours. Now, most ADN programs do however get their students to the clinical setting in a swifter fashion, therefore they begin working on their clinical skills sooner in their total educational experience. Stacy I have a feeling you will be a wonderful, professional and caring nurse no matter what educational route you have chosen. Best Wishes!
  10. by   military girl
    I'm sorry, but I don't seem to share your opinion that a BSN should be a required degree. I completed my BSN in August 2004, but before that I was a ADN nurse. What made me really bristle on day was a comment from a BSN who felt the same way that you did. When you put two nurses side by side, who can tell if one is an ADN and the other one is a BSN. If I'm a patient, I want a competent nurse, not one who is caught up in their title.
    Any by the way, the only reason that I went back to get my BSN is now I am a Army nurse and it was required if I wanted to go back on active duty. If I stayed in the reserves, my ADN would have been just fine.






    Quote from The Veridican
    R.N. is the only profession I know of that allows you to be considered one of the "learned professions" with only having completed an associate degree, and more often in the past, a diploma program.

    People make a lot out of the BSN, but if it were the minimum entrance degree for nursing, we wouldn't have 1/2 the nurses we have. I don't think a BSN is necessary, but I do feel a nurse should have a bachelors degree in some field so they are educated enough to converse intelligently with the other members of the healthcare team (doctors, administrators, PTs, OTs, RTs, other nurses, etc.).

    I am one of the rare individuals that believes a bachelors should be required before admission to nursing school, and nursing school should award a masters degree. The only problem is that no one would want to work at the bedside then.

    Where I work, you don't know which nurses are ADNs or BSNs because it's not on our name badges. But in reality, as soon as you talk to someone on the floor, you can tell whether they've had two years or four years of education.

    Just my two cents.

    Veridican
  11. by   lpn1313
    As I was told today "It's the 'N' part of the initials that matter, not the 'LP', 'R' or anything else"
  12. by   saltwaterstat
    Quote from jeepgirl
    Yeah, because I communicate using a system of grunts and hand gestures to talk to the doctors as it is.
    I LOVE IT...thats the way I have always worked too! ps...dont I maybe know ya from somewhere????????
  13. by   saltwaterstat
    Quote from lpn1313
    As I was told today "It's the 'N' part of the initials that matter, not the 'LP', 'R' or anything else"
    I agree its the "N" too. I am an LPN of 20 yrs and my experience is invaluable. I have read most of these posts, and I gotta say..."get over it". I dont happen to give a rats a** about the "degree debate". do what you feel you personally feel re: education. as for me, I DO need to obtain my ASN, probably BSN as I am in NC and the only jobs here for LPN's are in docs offices or LTC..
    my preference is ED (which I luckily was able to do yrs ago in Va., and love it!)..so I am outta luck unless I get further education, so be it.
    so..the nursing rules have changed..and hopefully it is only for the betterment of the patient. Isn't that why we are all here?
    If I in fact, go for my RN (which is up in the air as I'm also looking into RE (real estate), I will do as I have always...hopefully work w/ quality nurses (which I really can't remember ever looking for a further degree on their nametag other than LPN or RN)--just to make sure it wasn't the janitor assisting me. "degree" smarts or "experience" smarts...both would be nice, but the "experience" wins out in my book.
    I am just doing what I figure I will need to do...and not fighting it.
    ps..the RE thing...I just dont know...my hearts in nursing but sometimes ya just wonder, so I'm getting my "ducks in a row" and figuring it all out.

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