has anyone had success leaving nursing for something unrelated?

  1. 0
    Hi everyone:

    I was wondering if anyone had successfully transitioned from being a nurse to a different profession? if so, what are you/did you do? how did you do it?

    I am actively seeking a way out of nursing, but all of the non-hospital nursing jobs are completely saturated, and the experience required is constantly increasing. A few months back, most said "3 years acute care" now say "4-6 years". I just can't do it that long. I really can't.

    I have a degree in an unrelated field, but never worked in it prior to nursing school. Will that still help me?

    I appreciate any advice/comments!
  2. Get our hottest nursing topics delivered to your inbox.

  3. 2,078 Visits
    Find Similar Topics
  4. 11 Comments so far...

  5. 1
    I'm glad you posted this question and look forward to the responses.

    I've been a nurse for 15+ years and just cannot do it any more. Most of my experience is non-clinical in nature.

    I plan on returning to school and taking a couple of classes in Library Science - just want to try something different and see how it goes. The thought of returning to healthcare no longer interests me.

    Good luck to you.
    Marshall1 likes this.
  6. 4
    me too- am thinking of going back for Health Info Tech.
    I am perplexed at how hard it is to get non- clinical nurse jobs too. Even with experience. No one in my area is hiring except NH or acute care jobs. Some of the care manager jobs say must be RHIT or have coding experience already, and have BSN. Well, i wont be getting that experience working on an awful hospital floor, and BSN doesnt teach you how to code. But Ive got to do something soon before i drive off a cliff some night.

    It's too bad. when people aren't jerks, I actually didn't mind the job.

    Im thinking we wont hear too much from others who have left nursing- im sure they are never looking back!
    Genista, Ambitiouz, Marshall1, and 1 other like this.
  7. 8
    I'm pricing out hot dog carts right now.
  8. 3
    I suspect that those former nurses who have left nursing behind completely won't be found lurking much around here.
  9. 0
    I got very frustrated with nursing and went to law school. I did pass the Bar (first try, go me), but I couldn't find a job. The job market for new lawyers is even worse than the market for nurses. I could have opened my own office, but I watched classmates do that and realized that it wasn't for me. I was making more as a nurse than my classmates that went into their own practices. I'm so far out of law school now that I doubt I could ever get a job as a lawyer. I have a job in public health, though, so I'm extremely happy where I'm at in nursing, now, and have no desire to be anywhere else.
  10. 1
    I'm also interested in this thread. Every once in awhile I think of dental hygiene, as a hygenist. Your pt's can't talk...
    andreasmom02 likes this.
  11. 0
    I know someone who left ER nursing and opened one of those beauty nail spas on the East Coast. She is happy as can be.

    Someone else I know did nursing for a year, said it was not what she thought it was, and now owns an import/export business down South.

    Do whatever makes you happy.

    Best of luck!
  12. 4
    Isn't someone supposed to chime in and say, "But, nursing is so diversified and has so many different avenues you can pursue. You just haven't found your niche. Have you tried becoming a CNO or opening your own Nursing School? Don't give up, follow your dream."?
  13. 2
    1. One of my former nursing instructors owned and operated a dialysis equipment business for many years and sold it at a profit.

    2. A long-time member of these forums (GilaRRT) was a nurse who returned to school to become a respiratory therapist (RRT).

    3. Another long-time member who occasionally posts in the Nurse Entrepreneurs forum left bedside nursing and opened his own consulting business.

    4. Sadly, I know of an IEN (internationally educated nurse) who is working at a fast food joint in Tennessee because nursing stresses her out.

    5. I know of a deceased BSN who earned her doctoral degree in a non-nursing major and worked as a professor at a major university.

    6. Some nurses 'marry up' and no longer need to work because their spouses earn more than enough money to sustain comfortable lifestyles.
    andreasmom02 and RNperdiem like this.


Top