Graduate Nurse program with contract

  1. 1
    I took a job last August at a local hospital that offered a residency program and the fee for leaving after the program is 10000. However, If I stay for 2 years they would wave this fee. I have decided to leave after the program and am being faced with having to pay this whole fee up front. They will not take payments. I feel that this contract lures in graduate nurses that are these days hard pressed to find work and then it is used to keep them unhappily in a job that severely overworks them. With no way to escape I have been left with severe anxiety. Is there any thing I can do. I am in a non-union state.
    lindarn likes this.
  2. 32 Comments so far...

  3. 9
    If you signed a contract, you have a legally binding agreement with this organization - contact an attorney to explore your options. FYI, there is no such thing as a "non union state". No state has the power to prohibit organized labor.
    elkpark, laborer, Altra, and 6 others like this.
  4. 0
    Taft-Hartly Federal Law, 1947 ..." The Right To Work "
  5. 3
    I am also in a new grad residency program with a 3 year contract. The reason they charge so much is because they spend so much to put you through the residency and then nurses would just take off. My fellow residents and I were told that our hospital shelled out over $5000 for each new grad just for the training, not to mention preceptor pay and pay for the educators. Can you really blame then for wanting to recoup their losses? You knew what the contract was when you signed it, you can't alter it just because you want to leave now. Just MHO.
    DroogieRN, Altra, and OnlybyHisgraceRN like this.
  6. 3
    We cannot give legal advice here. My suggestion is that you contact a lawyer. You signed a contract that is binding, only a lawyer can negotiate loopholes.

    I'm sorry you are having a hard time. I wish you luck.
    herring_RN, Joanna777, and Meriwhen like this.
  7. 0
    Just so you know, there are hospitals with unions and new grad contracts, too. A union doesn't mean the contracts don't exist.
  8. 2
    Is it the entire hospital, or just your unit? Can you transfer to another unit?

    Keep in mind, the grass is not usually greener....

    Best wishes!
    Last edit by merlee on Apr 17, '12 : Reason: punctuation
    Altra and wooh like this.
  9. 0
    Quote from mamain
    I took a job last August at a local hospital that offered a residency program and the fee for leaving after the program is 10000. However, If I stay for 2 years they would wave this fee. I have decided to leave after the program and am being faced with having to pay this whole fee up front. They will not take payments. I feel that this contract lures in graduate nurses that are these days hard pressed to find work and then it is used to keep them unhappily in a job that severely overworks them. With no way to escape I have been left with severe anxiety. Is there any thing I can do. I am in a non-union state.
    Sorry to hear that you're facing a dilemma. You chose to enter the contract with your employer. Hopefully you understood the conditions of the contract before you "signed on the dotted line". Assuming (dangerous, I know!) that you knew this up front, then you are responsible for your own actions.

    Unhappy/overworked/anxiety/whatever....the conditions of the contract still apply. Your employer may demand payment in full, but if you're unable to pay the full amount in a single payment, then they must decide whether to demand payment in full (not gonna happen, apparently), or accept some sort of payment plan.

    If in doubt, consult an attorney (and be prepared to pay $$$ for the legal advice).

    Good luck!
  10. 0
    I’m not sure which part of the country you are in???? Most of the time if you take a step back, there is always some type of solution. First look into your local office of hours and wages, as well as the ACLU, (The American Civil Liberties Union), one does not have to be an active member to receive legal support. Also look into your state’s legal aid programs.

    It sounds like both parties have slipped up in this contract. The hospital has not explored all options in providing a hassle free environment and you signed a contract.

    Lastly, keep in mind that the first few years of nursing SUCK! The newbie is asking the most repetitive questions, confidence is at anall-time low and some season nurses, have premadonna / control issue, that will make a newbie feel as though they are working in Auschwitz’s.

    The grass may not always be greener, but sometimes a move works out best for all parties, the new grad and the rest of the unit. Have a heart to heart with your manager; be humble but not a doormat. There may be a solution that does not entail quitting.If not… protect yourself and look into your rights. The hospital has its' legal team on speed dial… yet at the same time… a call from the ACLU or bad publicity is not a welcomed guest in the healthcare arena these days.
    Last edit by NRSKarenRN on May 15, '12 : Reason: removed editing marks.
  11. 6
    Quote from irish4077
    first look into your local office of hours and wages, as well as the aclu, (the american civil liberties union), one does not have to be an active member to receive legal support. also look into your state’s legal aid programs.
    it sounds like both parties have slipped up in this contract. the hospital has not explored all options in providing a hassle free environment and you signed a contract. l
    why would the aclu be interested in this? it's not a civil liberties case. and why would you think the "hospital has not explored all options in providing a hassle free environment"?

    this sounds like a case of someone who was happy to take a valuable education (the residency) but not happy to have to pay for it when breaking the contract.

    presumably this contract was entered into without a gun to the head, so i see no reason why the hospital shouldn't prevail.
    elkpark, Epic_RN, PMFB-RN, and 3 others like this.


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