Extremely Overweight Nurses - page 5

I've been seeing a lot of obese nurses lately. In my opinion it's not setting the right example,not is it SAFE. If someone codes or there's a fire a nurses who is huge can't run to get to/from the... Read More

  1. Visit  slc1984 profile page
    8
    Some people can handle being a little overweight and still be quite active and capable. Others can handle being obese and still be quite active and capable. If however you are not at a "healthy" weight and you KNOW it is affecting your job performance (bending down to empty a foley, preforming CPR, discussing healthy lifestyle changes with a pt.) Then you need to do something to change it rather than get upset because someone else noticed it and made a comment. It's shouldn't be considered discrimination if it's true. I also think it should go both ways. I can't even count the number of obese patients I've taken care of that nurses have made comments about them needing to control their weight and eating habits. If a nurse can judge a patient for their choices, then patients can judge us for ours. I went to a doctor once who had to be pushing 400 lbs and it was hard listening to him tell me about a normal amount of weight to gain while pregnant and scold me for eating cheese because of the cholesterol in it. Like it or not, people and patients are judging you for your choices... just like the nurses who are doing assessments while smelling like an ashtray. When I was a PCT I had more than one patient make a comment to me about how bad the nurse smelled and wanted a different one. It was hard for me to go tell the nurse even though she needed to know. As bad as it hurts, sometimes you need to hear the truth.
    catladyRN, aTOMicTom, kungpoopanda, and 5 others like this.
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  3. Visit  GodIs082010 profile page
    0
    Quote from slc1984
    Some people can handle being a little overweight and still be quite active and capable. Others can handle being obese and still be quite active and capable. If however you are not at a "healthy" weight and you KNOW it is affecting your job performance (bending down to empty a foley, preforming CPR, discussing healthy lifestyle changes with a pt.) Then you need to do something to change it rather than get upset because someone else noticed it and made a comment. It's shouldn't be considered discrimination if it's true. I also think it should go both ways. I can't even count the number of obese patients I've taken care of that nurses have made comments about them needing to control their weight and eating habits. If a nurse can judge a patient for their choices, then patients can judge us for ours. I went to a doctor once who had to be pushing 400 lbs and it was hard listening to him tell me about a normal amount of weight to gain while pregnant and scold me for eating cheese because of the cholesterol in it. Like it or not, people and patients are judging you for your choices... just like the nurses who are doing assessments while smelling like an ashtray. When I was a PCT I had more than one patient make a comment to me about how bad the nurse smelled and wanted a different one. It was hard for me to go tell the nurse even though she needed to know. As bad as it hurts, sometimes you need to hear the truth.
    Right on point
  4. Visit  That Guy profile page
    0
    Ah the "image" of a nurse.....
  5. Visit  WannaBNursey profile page
    7
    I wonder if the OP is an aide or has actually seen an obese or "extremely overweight" nurse in action. I am admittedly an "extremely overweight" nursing student and CNA at a hospital and my weight has not affected my performance in my incredibly physical job. Once in awhile my big butt might bump into the computers in the patient rooms but other than that, I would say that I do an excellent job. I also work with a few "extremely overweight" nurses and they work their tails off! Some of the best nurses I know are "extremely overweight". Weight has nothing to do with their nursing skills...however attitude definitely does. Some thin as well as obese nurses have the worst attitudes and it makes them incredibly undesirable to work with.

    OP if you hate fat people so much, I would really keep it to yourself. Just a heads-up for your future career.
  6. Visit  tyvin profile page
    3
    Well it's done...obesity is now a disease.

    https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=web&cd=6&cad=rja&s qi=2&ved=0CEwQFjAF&url=http%3A%2F%2Farticles.washi ngtonpost.com%2F2013-06-28%2Fopinions%2F40253647_1_obese-patients-nutrition-unhealthy-weight&ei=Q6_hUaqiCYXEigLQg4H4AQ&usg=AFQjCNHtMIS-8nPHw5juP8kGzSgXbGSRLw&sig2=FNo6TrJKEZVZdMskHDcG2g

    Y
    ep, now everyone can eat up and claim disability. I am of the school that it's an addiction like drugs (alcohol is a drug). I think this opens up validation for people with eating problems. I'm not talking about mental health issues which is where I think this belongs. I too don't like to see overweight anybody. It sends a wrong message to our kids. If we as adults can't control what goes in our mouths claiming we are healthy and feel fine and comfortable being overweight simply because our cholesterol isn't up...well, I just think this is not the way to go.

    Everyone or mostly everyone has vehemently defended the right to be fat; I don't think people are sincerely taking the big picture into account.

    Modeling is how our children learn and eventually live. Is it a wonder that it's all getting out of control? I worry for our children.
    anneuhbanana, kungpoopanda, and slc1984 like this.
  7. Visit  slc1984 profile page
    1
    Quote from tyvin
    Well it's done...obesity is now a disease.

    https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=web&cd=6&cad=rja&s qi=2&ved=0CEwQFjAF&url=http%3A%2F%2Farticles.washi ngtonpost.com%2F2013-06-28%2Fopinions%2F40253647_1_obese-patients-nutrition-unhealthy-weight&ei=Q6_hUaqiCYXEigLQg4H4AQ&usg=AFQjCNHtMIS-8nPHw5juP8kGzSgXbGSRLw&sig2=FNo6TrJKEZVZdMskHDcG2g

    Y
    ep, now everyone can eat up and claim disability. I am of the school that it's an addiction like drugs (alcohol is a drug). I think this opens up validation for people with eating problems. I'm not talking about mental health issues which is where I think this belongs. I too don't like to see overweight anybody. It sends a wrong message to our kids. If we as adults can't control what goes in our mouths claiming we are healthy and feel fine and comfortable being overweight simply because our cholesterol isn't up...well, I just think this is not the way to go.

    Everyone or mostly everyone has vehemently defended the right to be fat; I don't think people are sincerely taking the big picture into account.

    Modeling is how our children learn and eventually live. Is it a wonder that it's all getting out of control? I worry for our children.
    This actually really surprised me! I expected all the "don't judge" comments, but I didn't expect people to say being fat benefited them in any way... that is the deluded way of thinking that will get us nowhere in terms of bettering the health of this country.
    angikat likes this.
  8. Visit  Future Nurse T profile page
    6
    Weight is a very sensitive topic. Yes, we should eat healthier and maintain a healthy weight but I don't think that people should treat others different, harshly, make fun of them, think they are incapable of doing their job because of their weight. Obesity is a problem but so is bullying and discrimination.
  9. Visit  Alisonisayoshi profile page
    4
    Quote from tyvin
    Well it's done...obesity is now a disease.

    https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=web&cd=6&cad=rja&s qi=2&ved=0CEwQFjAF&url=http%3A%2F%2Farticles.washi ngtonpost.com%2F2013-06-28%2Fopinions%2F40253647_1_obese-patients-nutrition-unhealthy-weight&ei=Q6_hUaqiCYXEigLQg4H4AQ&usg=AFQjCNHtMIS-8nPHw5juP8kGzSgXbGSRLw&sig2=FNo6TrJKEZVZdMskHDcG2g

    Y
    ep, now everyone can eat up and claim disability. I am of the school that it's an addiction like drugs (alcohol is a drug). I think this opens up validation for people with eating problems. I'm not talking about mental health issues which is where I think this belongs. I too don't like to see overweight anybody. It sends a wrong message to our kids. If we as adults can't control what goes in our mouths claiming we are healthy and feel fine and comfortable being overweight simply because our cholesterol isn't up...well, I just think this is not the way to go.

    Everyone or mostly everyone has vehemently defended the right to be fat; I don't think people are sincerely taking the big picture into account.

    Modeling is how our children learn and eventually live. Is it a wonder that it's all getting out of control? I worry for our children.
    I posted a link a page or so back, it's a TedMed talk given by a surgeon on the care and treatment of obesity, it focuses on Type 2 treatment and research, but it also goes into an interesting idea about how and why people become obese. The idea is the blame/shame/addiction treatment model isn't working. It's talking about a whole new outlook on how we treat the overweight (and Type 2 diabetes).

    I would not say that being overweight is healthy, but I am saying that, perhaps our ideas about why people who are overweight get that way in the first place is very, very flawed. Perhaps teaching children from birth to call overweight people lazy is also flawed, as it only perpetuates the blame/shame model of treatment. That model is obviously not working... Or obesity would not be an epidemic.
  10. Visit  krwrnbsn profile page
    1
    Quote from llg
    I see the OP hasn't come back to this thread. I guess she didn't really want to play with us. She just wanted to throw a hand grenade and run. How sad.
    True^^^^
    tayloramaRN2be likes this.
  11. Visit  txredheadnurse profile page
    6
    First point healh care workers are not role models for patients anymore than a mechanic is for a car owner or an electrician for a home owner, etc. If the only basis for selecting a role model is based on appearance that is so superficial as to be meaningless.

    Secondly as an obese person myself I promise you I am aware of how I look, how I do performing certain tasks, etc. My weight issues are more from simply what and how much I eat. I have a few medical conditions that require medications that lead to such things as impaired blood sugar levels and fluid retention. In actuality what impairs my ability to be at bedside anymore is not my overall size but my orthopedic injuries and arthritis resulting from the trauma of nearly 30 years in direct patient care. Even if I was reed slim I wouldn't be able to be bedside anymore because my back, hips, knees can't stand the stress of working on concrete floors and lifting, pushing, pulling and bending constantly. In other words working as a nurse and working night shift for most of my career until the last 10 years damaged me physically. It impaired my bones and messed up my GI tract. So now I do non direct care that doesn't impose so many stressors on my battered body. Dealing with chronic pain has also stimulated my appetite for "comfort foods" when my pain levels become near intolerable.

    Third thing even when a persons body isn't damaged by life or work experiences losing more than 30 pounds is not easy for anyone. Much of the food available either from restaurants or mainstream grocery stores is not as nutritious or healthy as it was in my childhood. It is a challenge to find healthy nutritious food whenever I am on the road for my job since hotels and restaurants in smaller to very small towns don't cater to "the health food crowd". Shoot it can be hard to find healthy food even in the large urban area I live in when I am home. I will confess when I am tired, hungry and thirsty it is much easier to buy a diet soda and a hamburger than drive around trying to find somewhere that has a decent salad that is more than iceburg lettuce and cheese and croutons.

    If you feel what I have written is all excuses, well I can't make you think differently. I would hope you have learned that a persons ability to perform and what they can contribute is compromised of much more than having a height/weight proportionate body. Please remember many of us extremely fat nurses didn't start our careers this way. And I dare say few of us really choose to be "supersized".
  12. Visit  ScoobieSnack profile page
    4
    Talk about killing the messenger! The OP is generally correct with his/her statements.Sure, there are always exceptions. So, please enlighten me with the specifics as to which statement by the OP put a bee in your bonnet.

    1. I’ve been seeing a lot of obese nurses lately. 2. In my opinion it's not setting the right example. 3. If someone codes or there's a fire a nurses who is huge can't run to get to/from the emergency. 4. Another example ... CPR! It's exhausting. 5. If you're not fit to do it...should that patient pay the price? It's so hypocritical. 6. I understand with long shifts and not much sleep... Gaining weight is extremely easy to do. 7. However, choosing healthy food options (not vending machines and Pepsi’s) and staying active even on your days off is important.
    angikat, aTOMicTom, kungpoopanda, and 1 other like this.
  13. Visit  krwrnbsn profile page
    2
    We have a nurse that works in the OR who can't even keep her mask up because she smokes like a freight train! She is more impaired than any obese nurse I've ever seen!
  14. Visit  stephanie. profile page
    5
    Quote from ScoobieSnack
    Talk about killing the messenger! The OP is generally correct with his/her statements.Sure, there are always exceptions. So, please enlighten me with the specifics as to which statement by the OP put a bee in your bonnet.

    1. I’ve been seeing a lot of obese nurses lately. 2. In my opinion it's not setting the right example. 3. If someone codes or there's a fire a nurses who is huge can't run to get to/from the emergency. 4. Another example ... CPR! It's exhausting. 5. If you're not fit to do it...should that patient pay the price? It's so hypocritical. 6. I understand with long shifts and not much sleep... Gaining weight is extremely easy to do. 7. However, choosing healthy food options (not vending machines and Pepsi’s) and staying active even on your days off is important.
    I have to agree.

    I don't think the OP was saying that an overweight nurse isn't capable of being a good nurse-
    But as caregivers we aught to be setting an example for those we are caring for.

    I come from a place of non-judgment. Every single person in my family is overweight with the exception of 4 of us. And we 4 live totally different lifestyles than everyone else- by choice. You don't need to be thin to be healthy and active.

    We are all human. Nurses, Drs, teachers, electricians are all subject to the same lifestyle and health issues. Drugs, alcoholism, obesity... But aren't these issues choices? We aren't born that way are we?

    As someone who has lost about 40 pounds from her peak weight- I had to take responsibility for my lifestyle and stop making excuses. If I didn't I would have ended up like every woman in my family!

    A vast majority of obese persons are in the spot they are in because they have made poor lifestyle choices. Sure there are factors such as depression or other physiological issues that start the snowball effect- but not everyone is subject to HAVING to live life in that manor.

    But why people are obese isn't the issue. It's the whole "Do as I say, not as I do" mentality. Why in the world would i take advice from a medical provider who does t follow his own teaching? Or trust a dentist who has bad teeth? Why choose a lifestyle that inhibits life?

    My first year of college I had an amazing teacher for med term that I absolutely adored. She is an RN. I think about her often. She was at the extreme end of morbidly obese- she was to the point that her skin wouldn't heal itself and she could barely breathe as she walked down the hall. But she came to class everyday with a super sized McDonald's Coke.

    Sure she taught well and was likable. But half
    The time all I could think of was that this woman's knows the consequences of her actions, she sees it at work everyday, yet she is still making those choices. Why? She's one of the lucky ones who KNOWS what poor lifestyle choices can do to you unlike most Americans who are slightly/mostly oblivious. It's hard to respect that. And although her size never limited her knowledge or standard of care given, it limited the way she could perform her tasks. She couldn't bend over or move easily. And I can only imagine that in small patient rooms there would even be issues with coworkers being able to move freely.

    I
    angikat, kungpoopanda, tyvin, and 2 others like this.


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