Does it matter what school you go to? - page 2

by floridanurse2b | 1,507 Views | 12 Comments

Another question, as I ponder whether I'll get into any school, LPN or RN, before I turn old and gray - does it matter where I go to school? Would my pay scale be higher if I graduated from a four-year college or a community... Read More


  1. 0
    Oddly, I am looking at changing my liscnece to a NY liscence and found that for my BSN I can indeed get about a 3,000 dollar increase in pay per year. Now, 3,000 is not that much in the grand scheme of things, but it is something. However, it is the first time in my life the BSN has done me any financial favors....

    As far as schools, I would agree it really does not matter, as long as it is accredited, and has a good pass rate for the boards. If you are really in a bind, getting the LPN is not a bad thing because you might then be able to get a job and have the rest of your education financed by the hospital you work for...but it is a round about way of doing things and you might not enjoy the longer process...
  2. 0
    Quote from floridanurse2b
    What would a school do or not do that would affect the pass rates of their students?
    1. The admissions criteria are more strict at some schools than at others. The average SAT score, ability to pass standardized tests, etc. are all factors in the NCLEX pass rate.

    2. Some schools set higher performance standards than others -- and flunk people out who can't meet those standards. Other schools "pass people along" even though their level of performance is below that required to pass NCLEX (or be a good practicing nurse.)

    3. Some schools "teach to the test" more than other schools. Some school gear all of the classes around passing the NCLEX while other schools focus on providing a good education in a more general sense. That's a common (but not universal) difference between lots of ADN programs and BSN programs.

    So ... when you are considering different schools, you need to look at all of those things and not just any one thing. One school may have a very high NCLEX pass rate -- but it is because they flunked out 50% of their entering students. Only those who proved they could pass the NCLEX on the first try were aloud to graduate. Another school may have a high pass rate because they only accepted students who had exceptionally high standardized test scores (e.g. SAT), showing that they would perform well on standardized tests. Yet another school may have a high pass rate because they offer special programs, tutoring, etc. to help the students pass.

    Another school may have a relatively low pass rate because they don't focus on taking the test as a major feature of their program. They focus on graduating a nurse with well-rounded education -- who might need 2 tries to pass the exam, but who will be a good nurse in the long run and perhaps better prepared to adapt to changing conditions in society over the years.

    It's really a very complicated issue and you should look for the program that fits your needs best. It might (but might not) be the one with the highest pass rate. If you know going in that the pass rate is not great, you can take steps on your own to improve your chances of passing on the first try.

    llg
  3. 0
    Hey, I would be happy to get $3,000 more in pay a year! That's a lot of shoe shopping. I know the LPN degree is a roundabout way to get what I want, but the nursing school situation is very challenging these days, with so many people applying for so few slots. If I could just finish up my prerequisites, apply to an RN school, and get in right away, I would do that. But as it stands, I have to finish my prerequisites before I apply to all of the schools I've talked to (I could apply before I finish them but it will hurt my chances of getting in), and THEN even if I get accepted right away, a lot of local community college programs are saying it will be two or three years before you can start school! So oddly, getting an LPN and then going for a bridge program might be faster. Unless I can get into an accelerated second bachelor's degree program, which is something else I will try.

    Quote from KatieBell
    Oddly, I am looking at changing my liscnece to a NY liscence and found that for my BSN I can indeed get about a 3,000 dollar increase in pay per year. Now, 3,000 is not that much in the grand scheme of things, but it is something. However, it is the first time in my life the BSN has done me any financial favors....

    As far as schools, I would agree it really does not matter, as long as it is accredited, and has a good pass rate for the boards. If you are really in a bind, getting the LPN is not a bad thing because you might then be able to get a job and have the rest of your education financed by the hospital you work for...but it is a round about way of doing things and you might not enjoy the longer process...


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