does anyone have any wise advice for me?

  1. I have a degree BS in biobehavioral health and minor in womens studies. I know I have all basic gen requirements fullfilled and a couple of nursing classes but what is the best most efficient and cheapest way I can become an RN.....I am just learning that you do not have to have a bS degree to become an RN? what is the difference? Shall I just go through that route? What is differnce between Assoc RN BSN, Nursing Dipploma? is it pay scale and/or job function?
    I really need to start somewhere so I am starting on this forum
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  2. 3 Comments

  3. by   essarache
    im just learning about starting on my path as well, but I can give you everything I know. The quickest and cheapest way to becoming an RN is probably through a community college where you will get an Associates degree ( 2 years )in nursing, that grants you the opportunity to take the test to become a RN. But if you are planning on making more money down the line, you will need a Bachelors degree in nursing to start off, and some experience. Then you can apply to different schools for a specific specialty, like for instance to become something like a CRNA. And again, anyone can correct me if im wrong since im still just learning
  4. by   txpixiedust
    This isn't a correction - just a little more detailed answer.

    The quickest route may have more to do with how "easy" it is to get into the various programs in your area. Several members on this site have stated that it was faster for them to get into a ADN (2 year) program, but almost as many have stated it was quicker for them to get into a BSN (4 year) program. And that really depends on how many students each school accepts - and whether they have only Fall entrance, or Fall & Spring entrances for their Nursing program.

    As to a pay difference between ADN and BSN - that depends on the area you live in also. Here in the Dallas-Ft Worth area, the pay is either the same or 50 cents more per hour for BSN's. I've read many posts where nurses say the pay is roughly the same. Many (not all) nurses get their BSN because they want job security (every once in awhile there is talk about requiring a BSN), want to be in management, or they want to eventually get their MSN - either NP or MSN in Education.

    I got my ADN, and I'm currently taking courses towards my BSN. Someday I'd like to have my MSN in Education so that I can teach when I retire from the bedside. And...I think I love going to school now! ha!:spin: It's really up to you - I think both programs can be great, and like people even two ADN or BSN programs aren't just alike. I'd say consider your life - whether you need to work, if you're married, have kids, etc. and go from there.

    Good Luck & God Bless!
    txpixiedust
  5. by   smile123
    Quote from reginaa
    I have a degree BS in biobehavioral health and minor in womens studies. I know I have all basic gen requirements fullfilled and a couple of nursing classes but what is the best most efficient and cheapest way I can become an RN.....I am just learning that you do not have to have a bS degree to become an RN? what is the difference? Shall I just go through that route? What is differnce between Assoc RN BSN, Nursing Dipploma? is it pay scale and/or job function?
    I really need to start somewhere so I am starting on this forum
    Since you already have a BS in another field, I would suggest you go for the accelerated BSN degree. It takes 12 to 14 months, which is less time than a 2 year ADN degree. At some hospitals, BSN trained nurses earn a little more than ADN nurses. There aren't too many places that offer the nursing diplomas any more, so I would go with the ADN or the BSN route. The ADN and BSN's have to take the same nursing boards (NCLEX).

    Generally it is cheaper to get a ADN, but those schools are heavily impacted. You may wait a couple of years before you will be accepted into a community college ADN program. BSN programs are a little more expensive. I would not go the traditional route (4 years); do the accelerated track.

    Once you have a RN, you will do the same job on the nursing floor in a hospital whether you are a ADN or BSN RN; it's only the pay. However, if you want to move into management or public health or teaching, you will need a BSN as a stepping stone.

    I would also suggest you talk to a career counselor at your school. They could also give you some insight. Good luck!

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