aweful as a CNA, what else can I do?

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    I'm a CNA and it is aweful. I quit the last job because of management and uncooperative staff. The home I currently work at is frequently under staffed, to ask the nurses to minorly assist is like asking them to do surgery, yeah it's that impossible. I've hurt my back now and am seeing a work comp doctor and going to pt. They are taking me off of light duty but i haven't been re-evaluated yet. I still hurt but mostly at night and then in the morning. They only had me and 2 aides for almost 70 some residents. I've had it and want to move on.
    Here are my qualifications: high school graduate, 3.8 gpa, college graduate 2004, courses in fundamentals of nursing, medical surgical nursing, cpr, seminar in stroke care, burns, medical terminolgy, able to use a computer, typing, member of phi theta kappa, psychology courses, anatomy and physiology, and pharmacology. Most of my work history involves deli work, hospital clinicals, cleaning, meat dept, cashier, restaurant, and an assistant for blind students.
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  3. 6 Comments so far...

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    Have you thought about working as a patient care tech/CNA in a hospital? I did this back when I was in nursing school, and it was a wonderful experience. The work is much less physically demanding than in the nursing home setting, plus you'll probably get a chance to learn expanded skills such as checking blood sugars, taking out tubes and catheters, doing phlebotomy and other tasks that CNAs in LTC usually don't get to do. You'll also have the pleasure of caring for patients of all ages, with all sorts of conditions.......it's definitely good training if you're going to become a nurse, and it's less likely that you'll get burned out.

    Best of luck to you.
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    You could also look into home health or an assisted living facility. My 23-year-old daughter has been a CNA for 4 years and has worked in all kinds of situations (she usually has two jobs at a time and once had three) and those were the ones she liked best. With home health, you see one client at a time and you usually get paid an amount for mileage. In assisted living, the clients should be ambulatory and somewhat coherent. If you work third shift, you might have some time to study.

    Cheers,
    Miranda F.
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    What about medical transcriptionist? I did that while I was in LPN school and it was very flexible and the pay was much better than the CNA wages at the time.
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    I have applied to hospitals in the past for cna work. The local hospital told me that I didn't have enough experience. The other hospital which is almost 25 miles away said they couldn't work around a nursing school schedule. I have applied to assisted living facilities but wasn't successful. Around here since the economy is bad and alot of people are out of work, you can put in 20 even 30 applications and no one calls. I have done home health but only received 17 hours, drove around 90 some miles a week, for 3 clients. The other home health place told me they would call me and get me started after the interview but never did. I call them and the position had just been filled. The phlebotomy won't coincide with my schedule as it is evenings and weekends. The nursing home I'm at is suppose to be assisted living but where? I do it all for these clients. but maybe that medical transcription is worth looking into. what do you have to know how to do, any courses needed??
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    I did medical transcription in an agency (medical transcriptionist agency) in Las Vegas. I had no special preparation, just my knowledge of medical terminology and A&P. They taught me how to do the technology of it. You might try to locate a local transcription agency.
  9. 0
    Quote from mjlrn97
    have you thought about working as a patient care tech/cna in a hospital? i did this back when i was in nursing school, and it was a wonderful experience. the work is much less physically demanding than in the nursing home setting, plus you'll probably get a chance to learn expanded skills such as checking blood sugars, taking out tubes and catheters, doing phlebotomy and other tasks that cnas in ltc usually don't get to do. you'll also have the pleasure of caring for patients of all ages, with all sorts of conditions.......it's definitely good training if you're going to become a nurse, and it's less likely that you'll get burned out.

    best of luck to you.
    i agree. i've worked in both settings and you'll pick up more skills in acute, but you'll be a nurse taking care of residents in ltc.

    i know alot of pca/cp's that could never survive in a convalescent type setting.


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