Associate of nursing and bachelor of science to bsn

  1. 0 I have an associate nursing degree and a bachelor of science in communication. I would like to have a bsn and think I would need a few more classes to accomplish this. I see all kinds of online and other university advertisement for rn to bsn, but cannot find any information on someone who already had a bachelors and a bs becoming a bsn...anyone know schools that do this or what exactly it may take to complete? Please help!
  2. Visit  adcockrn profile page

    About adcockrn

    Joined Oct '11; Posts: 3.

    10 Comments so far...

  3. Visit  klone profile page
    0
    For most schools that offer RN-BSN programs, the classes required are strictly nursing related, so I don't think having a BS in Communications is going to shorten your schooling in any significant way.
  4. Visit  deltaroxxy2 profile page
    1
    I have a diploma in nursing and a BS in Biochemistry. Currently enrolled ar Ohio University. I think you should research school so see how much of your credits they will accept. OU accepted quite a bit of my credits from my previous BS degree. But my degree was science related.

    Here is a great OU university link:

    http://allnurses.com/distance-learni...rn-534171.html
    adcockrn likes this.
  5. Visit  adcockrn profile page
    0
    Quote from klone
    For most schools that offer RN-BSN programs, the classes required are strictly nursing related, so I don't think having a BS in Communications is going to shorten your schooling in any significant way.
    I know that going from associates to bachelors level requires a lot of the basic classes that I have already had such as all the englishes, chemistry, liberal arts, maths, etc...so I know I will not have to re take those...just wondering what specific nursing classes there r to advance this degree. Thanks for ur reply!
  6. Visit  EDnursetobe profile page
    0
    since you already have your RN and a bachelors don't bother with the BSN. it's not worth it, you're already qualified for BSN jobs since you have both.

    it's much smarter to go RN to MSN route.
  7. Visit  heatheryk profile page
    0
    for management I think they would consider you w/o the BSN. I don't know where you live but in CA you can get your PHN with a BA + a community health class/clinical
  8. Visit  deltaroxxy2 profile page
    0
    Quote from heatheryk
    for management I think they would consider you w/o the BSN. I don't know where you live but in CA you can get your PHN with a BA + a community health class/clinical
    Think it depends on whether or not you work for a magnet facility. A lot of nurses (myself included) have had to go back to school in order to obtain our BSN b/c our hospital was now magnet. No promotions or job transfers w/out it.
  9. Visit  adcockrn profile page
    0
    Appreciate the input thus far! I am considering going the rn/msn route but I have small children and will probably put this big step off for a bit. The hospital I work for does not distinguish in pay an and and a bsn and they do consider my prior bs appropriate for management positions..though I am not intersted in management at this time. What I want to do is pick up an extra day as a clinical instructor and the school here requires a bsn to do this!
  10. Visit  pedicurn profile page
    0
    Quote from deltaroxxy2
    Think it depends on whether or not you work for a magnet facility. A lot of nurses (myself included) have had to go back to school in order to obtain our BSN b/c our hospital was now magnet. No promotions or job transfers w/out it.
    Would the magnet facilities allow an ADN -MSN instead? Or would a post-graduate diploma in nursing suffice?
    It seems a shame to have to earn a bachelors all over again.
  11. Visit  MrChicagoRN profile page
    1
    Quote from pedicurn
    Would the magnet facilities allow an ADN -MSN instead? Or would a post-graduate diploma in nursing suffice?
    It seems a shame to have to earn a bachelors all over again.
    Magnet requires ONE degree in nursing science for management positions; BSN, MSN, ~or~ DNS/PhD
    pedicurn likes this.
  12. Visit  MrChicagoRN profile page
    0
    Quote from adcockrn
    Appreciate the input thus far! I am considering going the rn/msn route but I have small children and will probably put this big step off for a bit. The hospital I work for does not distinguish in pay an and and a bsn and they do consider my prior bs appropriate for management positions..though I am not intersted in management at this time. What I want to do is pick up an extra day as a clinical instructor and the school here requires a bsn to do this!
    A BSN/MSN will give you more employment flexibility. An MSN will open many more doors regarding being an instructor beyond the one school.

    For you, it may be almost the same work to get one degree as the other.


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