Adn Or Bsn

  1. 0
    Hi, I hold a bachelor of science in education.
    I want to pursue nursing and am wondering if I should go to LPN school, then keep on and get my ADN. Someone said I should try to get a BSN. How much longer would it take? Is it to my advantage to go the ADN route?
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  4. 0
    Quote from mollyz
    Hi, I hold a bachelor of science in education.
    I want to pursue nursing and am wondering if I should go to LPN school, then keep on and get my ADN. Someone said I should try to get a BSN. How much longer would it take? Is it to my advantage to go the ADN route?
    Go BSN if you want to be a RN. Unless your goal is to work mostly in long-term care, don't go the LPN/LVN route. Since you will already have alot of your pre-reqs done by having a BS in Education, you will be ahead of the game.

    There are alot of threads on this issue.

    steph
  5. 0
    go for the bsn. it shouldn't take you that much longer, as you already have your humanities and music/art and other electives. unless you do an accelerated program (which sounds completely insane to me), you will still need to do 4 consecutive semesters of nursing classes and clinicals. you'd be on the same schedule for the adn as well (you wont get out any quicker than two years).
  6. 0
    go for the bsn!!!
    i already had a bachelor of business administration degree when i decided to pursue a nursing career over 10 years ago. as a result, i was able transfer a lot of these credits towards the bsn program. all i had to do was take prerequisite courses specific to nursing curriculum (ie medical terminology, pharmacology, etc) prior to acceptance into the actual school of nursing program at my institution (2 years of classes/clinicals).
    best of luck to you!!!
  7. 0
    Quote from alibar
    go for the bsn!!!


    i already had a bachelor of business administration degree when i decided to pursue a nursing career over 10 years ago. as a result, i was able transfer a lot of these credits towards the bsn program. all i had to do was take prerequisite courses specific to nursing curriculum (ie medical terminology, pharmacology, etc) prior to acceptance into the actual school of nursing program at my institution (2 years of classes/clinicals).


    best of luck to you!!!
    thanks for the info, but i have a question...did you get to become an lpn first? i want to be able to work as an lpn for awhile. i can't afford to take endless classes without working at something. thanks!
  8. 0
    It may take only nine more months to a year longer to get your BSN (especially since as Steph said you're ahead of the game) than getting the LPN, so it's might not be as endless as you think.

    The LPN to RN route is one taken by a lot of people, especially those anxious to work. But many people also get tired of school and get in a rut of working and don't persue the RN as quickly as they initially thought they would. Or like me, I want the BSN but have been an ADN RN for 15 years and still haven't finished the BSN.

    But the LPN to RN route is definately a good option.
  9. 0
    Quote from mollyz
    Thanks for the info, but I have a question...did you get to become an LPN first? I want to be able to work as an lpn for awhile. I can't afford to take endless classes without working at something. Thanks!
    I understand your concerns. I decided not to work as an LPN because, at that time, my objective was to obtain BSN ASAP. That worked well for me because of the long class hours and clinicals associated with the BSN program. I did not want to take classes and exam for LPN only to return to school months (or even years) later to obtain RN degree. However, I did work as a part-time Unit Secretary and Med-Surg Technician at local hospital on weekends while attending nursing school. This allowed me to get some experience in medical field as well as provided me with a small scholarship to help finance RN education (as long as I agreed to work for 1 year as RN at that hospital upon completion of BSN program). Hope this helps.
    Best of luck to you!
  10. 0
    Quote from mollyz
    Hi, I hold a bachelor of science in education.
    I want to pursue nursing and am wondering if I should go to LPN school, then keep on and get my ADN. Someone said I should try to get a BSN. How much longer would it take? Is it to my advantage to go the ADN route?
    If you aready have a bachelor's in something you could try for an alternate entry MSN degree. One of my clinical instructors did this. She started in government as a health care lobbyist and then went through the alternate entry program. They pretty much speed up the BSN and tack on the MSN to it. Ultimately, it really just depends on what your final goal in nursing is. If you want to only work floor then an ADN is fine. If you want to charge or work up into administration then you'll need a BSN. If you want to do advanced practice then go for the MSN. This is also subject to your personal wishes, some people want a higher degree just for personal satisfaction as well. Best of luck!


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