USA RN to Melbourne!!! - page 3

Hello fellow nurses!!! I'm a USA RN with 1 yr med/surg experience. I already got Australia RN license and passed ANMAC's skill assessment for immigration!!! I'm planning to move to a big... Read More

  1. Visit  K+MgSO4 profile page
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    Quote from talaxandra
    ETA: our uniform includes pants and skirt, so you can choose I don't know if the guys get the same choice...
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  3. Visit  Mcadamia profile page
    1
    Quote from nursegirl62
    Have I offended you? I only expressed my experiences here, which were asked for by another nurse coming from the USA. I don't ever recall implying or stating the the USA is better than anywhere.
    As for the car , yep happened right at the St. Kilda Police station and no doubt the Victoria Police have much more important things to do than look for stolen cars. But to find out that I'm not entitled to calling on the police for help well that was a news for me and never was listed on my work visa.
    The police issue should NOT have happened! If you EVER get a reply like that again ask for the constable's name and report them!

    But that aside - I gather from your reply that you felt I was maligning the depth of the knowledge of the USA RN - not so! But I truly doubt that any American nurse in America would be expected to be not only the ONLY health care personnel for hundreds of Kilometres but also the ambulance officer, social worker and all around go to person. The nurse in a place like Bedourie HAS to wear multiple hats and basically be whatever is required
    carolmaccas66 likes this.
  4. Visit  SarahRN1987 profile page
    2
    In response to the posts regarding Australians as anti-American, I have found that to not be true. I graduated with my ADN in 2009, worked full-time on a home care case, and moved to Australia in 2010. I had no acute care experience, but wanted to get into the hospital system here, and ended up joining an agency because I couldn't get hired by any hospitals with my lack of experience. The first few months were extremely difficult. I was doing new tasks that I had never done before, getting used to new terminology and medication names, etc. But I found the nurses that I worked with to be very understanding, patient, and helpful. Of course there is always one or two people who are the exceptions and just don't have time for you, but you get that anywhere. I have found though that nurses here seem to be trained much better than nurses in the US - at least the ones from my nursing school anyway! lol So anyway, not discounting anyone else's experiences and definitely not saying that everyone here loves Americans, but I have not encountered anyone who really set me off in these 5 months that I have been nursing here. I've also lived here for over a year now and most people think it's actually really interesting that I have moved here, and I wish I had a dollar for every time someone told me they liked my accent :P haha. So anyway, there's my two cents on the matter!

    -Sarah
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  5. Visit  resilientnurse profile page
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    The issue of racism was brought up on this thread and I would like to some additional insight. I am a Black American nurse considering a job position in Australia. I have already had some negative experiences working as a nurse abroad and am cautioned by the potentiality of this. Any advice? Thank you.
  6. Visit  ceridwyn profile page
    1
    Australia is a multicultural country. Most of the rest of the world except original people from the UK have some sort of skin colour. I live in Melbourne, that has indigenous, sudanese, people from zimbawe? people from india, pakistan, maldives tahiti, south Americain and as a white skinned Australian often is in minority....do you think you will stand out?

    One ward I worked on recently, I was the only citizen born here! of 8 nurses of all skin colours, 1 American and we all worked really well as a team on a busy ward.

    We love American nurses, they say things so well and loud......
    Just watch what you say though,

    If you start comparing the United states to Australia, and telling others how much better it is 'back home and how backward Australia is and say words like, how quaint and how darling...... you will get ventually''have someone will bite back, skin colour will have nothing to do with it.

    Welcome and enjoy yourself! put another shrimp on the barby/ie
    Last edit by ceridwyn on Jul 29, '11
    carolmaccas66 likes this.
  7. Visit  talaxandra profile page
    1
    Hi resilient

    Australians tend to think of ourselves as egalitarian and accepting, and we're certainly a multicultural lot, but the only people who think there's no racism here are white (and that certainly doesn't exempt anyone - as we all know, prejudice can fly in any and every direction).

    For the most part colleagues will be fine and prejudice will not be overt, but there are feral patients and unpleasant people everywhere. Your odds are better in the most multicultural cities (eg Melbourne, Sydney), but there are lovely people everywhere, too.

    The Australian sense of humour can be sarcastic and direct, and a lot of the cultural baggage is different, which can cause offence when none was meant. For the most part what staff will care about is how well you do your job, and how well yiou fit in to the ward culture. Good luck
    carolmaccas66 likes this.
  8. Visit  Aussie-R.N. profile page
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    Up here in QLD we employ 'pre-reg' AINs. They have a little bit of a scope of practice but not much past vital signs & pressure area care. Also in QLD nurses venipuncture is not included in under-graduate education so is a post-reg course.

    I first worked as new grad at Snt Vincents & the Mercy Private hospitals & totally loved it. Melbourne is a great place to live and work. Enjoy & welcome to Oz.
  9. Visit  nursegirl62 profile page
    1
    Quote from talaxandra
    Hi resilient

    The Australian sense of humour can be sarcastic and direct, and a lot of the cultural baggage is different, which can cause offence when none was meant. For the most part what staff will care about is how well you do your job, and how well yiou fit in to the ward culture. Good luck

    Yes, even after several years I struggle at times with the line between humor and racism. Just the other night a work ..one of the Cardiologists shouts out and points of me in front of patients and staff..."YOU AMERICANS ARE RUINING THE WORLD" heads were turning at me in response. I was speechless . He went on to say it because of the failure of senate/house to pass the legislation that if the USA went into default . If default happened his investments would crumble and the new house he was building would be in jeopardy with the bank loan.
    Now this doc and I have a great working relationship, and so based on that I was reasonably sure he wasn't meaning this in a cruel way or directed at me personally. I just kept my mouth shut, and let him and others have their laughs.

    I NEVER make reference to life better in USA (as if! ) or that skills, education or anything is better . NO COMPARISIONS. I've seen nurse's from USA, Holland, UK ...make that mistake. I never say I miss my family or friends or any foods/holidays that might be associated with the USA....heck outside of this forum I never say the words...United States, USA, America, American , ect....I only offer that if asked where I'm from.

    Australia is a great place to live and work and that outweighs everything else for me . I still am amazed at how much safer it is here! Some Americans will flourish here , others will sink and be miserable. Sure that applies to all who have came here . I will openly say this...just because your children have dark skin it will NOT be assumed they are gang bangers, packing a gun , and they won't be exposed to that lifestyle here either. Your children will have the SAME great opportunities here that all children in Australia have. I think Australia really embraces multicultural , quality education, and opportunities here for those who want it and except the Australian way of living. If their young enough ...heck they will acquire the cool Aussie accent too!
    talaxandra likes this.
  10. Visit  talaxandra profile page
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    If we worked together I might ask you what you think the Republicans are trying to achieve, because I assume you've got a greater insight than I into US party politics, but I'd be pretty uncomfortable with "You American's are ruining the world" and I don't think you've personally got any power over the global economy!

    I've just come back from a quick trip to WA and already miss Baby Ruth bars, so feel free to whinge about foods from home to me
  11. Visit  64t0 profile page
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    Quote from Aussie-R.N.
    Up here in QLD we employ 'pre-reg' AINs. They have a little bit of a scope of practice but not much past vital signs & pressure area care. Also in QLD nurses venipuncture is not included in under-graduate education so is a post-reg course.

    I first worked as new grad at Snt Vincents & the Mercy Private hospitals & totally loved it. Melbourne is a great place to live and work. Enjoy & welcome to Oz.
    Hello, do you employ nurses without much work experience? If not, would it be possible?
  12. Visit  AnneI profile page
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    Hi all, so after you obtain an Australia RN license you have to then apply for ANMAC assessment or is it the other way around?
  13. Visit  American in Oz profile page
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    Consider getting the book "Living Abroad in Australia" by James M. Lane. It's not specific toward nurses, but as an American who moved to NSW a few months ago, I found it a handy resource on what to expect -- including some of the stereotypes you might face as an American. It also talks about costs of living, etc. Good luck!
  14. Visit  PMFB-RN profile page
    2
    [quote=nursegirl62;5276555]I have been in Melbourne in one of the ICUs of the large hospitals mentioned here for over 2 years. I won't paint a rosy picture for you of my experience.
    Melbourne it's is VERY expensive to live, one of the most expensive cities in the world. Also, as an American be prepared to hear some very racists comments about others. You will be subjected to many here who consider American nursing schools and the RNs coming from them as inferior. Americans in general are NOT liked here in Australia, if in doubt spend some time reading comments online that are posted in the large Melbourne newspapers. Took me several attempts to secure a flat, and was denied 2 times solely because I was American!
    quote]

    *** I met and married my wife in Austraila. We lived there for over a year in Brisbane Queensland. I did not work as a nurse but I can second the other aspects of being an American in Oz. My experience is that Americans are not well liked at all. Barely tolerated at best and met with open hostility at worst. I experienced this dislike from people I had never interacted with at all so it is not just me. Also agree on the racism. I regularly heard highly racist comments in public and even on TV & radio that where shocking to my American ears. I can't speak to US nurses being considered inferior but I left with impression that Americans, American things, American institutions, and American education were considered decidedly inferior in the eyes of Austrailians. I have to say that I was treated wonderfully by most everybody who I got to know and worked with and made many friends.
    I absolutly loved Austraila. We spent a lot of time in some very rural areas of Queensland. My inlaws own a large (by American standards) station (ranch) near Blackall in central Queensland. I very much appreciate the self sufficient, can-do sprit I encountered among those living and working in the remote and rural areas.
    Last edit by PMFB-RN on Sep 18, '11
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