Are you a nurse with "alternative" spiritual beliefs? - page 2

by GadgetRN71

If so, have you gotten grief from coworkers or patients because of it? Tell your stories here!!I'm pagan, and I'm pretty low key about it. I have nothing against Jesus. If he existed, I think he must have been a pretty cool dude.... Read More


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    Hmmmm... interesting conversation. There hasn't been any "Xtian" input yet so, since I qualify, I'll put in my 2 cents worth.

    I think what some of you have experienced is "being witnessed to." If you view it from the stand point of the witness' beliefs that unsaved people will suffer terribly forever (and this is very real to them) it is (not always, but often) genuine concern for you that they take the time to try to explain their faith and the Bible etc. to you. So, that is the best spin I can put on it. We live in a secular society and the social rules about discussing politics and religion with strangers is probably good policy.

    But there are so many variants and shades of Christianity you just can't generalize. My beliefs arise out of the Genevan Reformation. The major point there is that God is sovereign over his church (duh!) and will gather its members as it pleases Him. Meaning, if God wants to save you, you will be saved. If not. You won't. It's refreshing for me to know that He is in charge of these things and not me. I used to be an "evangelical" like the ones you describe and I remember the heavy pressure that is put on everyone to go out and "witness". It's not that I won't do it... we are to be competent to explain our faith when asked to do so. (And yes, sometimes Christians are asked about these things.)

    The real irony here is that all of this means I'm a Calvinist, and most Evangelicals are more suspicious of us than they are of Pagans.

    Brainkandy... I was a sailor (or at least in the Navy) and I sometimes use very earthy language. But I try very hard to avoid profanity. I might get "earthy" at times, but would feel horrible if found myself useing God's name in vain. I don't know if puts me in the hypocrite pew or not.

    I figured it might help to give you a real target so you wouldn't have to keep working over your straw men.
  2. 0
    Quote from ElizaW
    You must be quite a bit younger than me. In my day Catholics wore crosses and Jews wore stars of David. I still think it's disrespectful to sport the iconography of a specific religion as a non-believer. As a Jew I was very offended when I saw Sarah Palin wearing a huge, conspicuous Star of David.
    I have never worn a star of David, and I do think some jewelry is made to look quite close to an actual religious iconograph. And I mean no disrespect, however in my own personal beliefs I could perhaps take a lesson or 2 from a number of religious organizations......
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    Quote from jmqphd
    Hmmmm... interesting conversation. There hasn't been any "Xtian" input yet so, since I qualify, I'll put in my 2 cents worth.

    I think what some of you have experienced is "being witnessed to." If you view it from the stand point of the witness' beliefs that unsaved people will suffer terribly forever (and this is very real to them) it is (not always, but often) genuine concern for you that they take the time to try to explain their faith and the Bible etc. to you. So, that is the best spin I can put on it. We live in a secular society and the social rules about discussing politics and religion with strangers is probably good policy.

    But there are so many variants and shades of Christianity you just can't generalize. My beliefs arise out of the Genevan Reformation. The major point there is that God is sovereign over his church (duh!) and will gather its members as it pleases Him. Meaning, if God wants to save you, you will be saved. If not. You won't. It's refreshing for me to know that He is in charge of these things and not me. I used to be an "evangelical" like the ones you describe and I remember the heavy pressure that is put on everyone to go out and "witness". It's not that I won't do it... we are to be competent to explain our faith when asked to do so. (And yes, sometimes Christians are asked about these things.)

    The real irony here is that all of this means I'm a Calvinist, and most Evangelicals are more suspicious of us than they are of Pagans.

    Brainkandy... I was a sailor (or at least in the Navy) and I sometimes use very earthy language. But I try very hard to avoid profanity. I might get "earthy" at times, but would feel horrible if found myself useing God's name in vain. I don't know if puts me in the hypocrite pew or not.

    I figured it might help to give you a real target so you wouldn't have to keep working over your straw men.
    And with all due respect jmqphd, this is akin to "lets witness to others, it will please God, and I will get into Heaven" vs. "all these people will pay lots of money to our church to believe they are worthy of ever lasting life, jokes on them, as God picks and chooses".
    People should live their lives with good intent, good hearts, kind words. Kindness goes a long way. As nurses, we need to think about what a patient's belief is, not out own....it is not about us when we are working.
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    Quote from GadgetRN71
    If so, have you gotten grief from coworkers or patients because of it? Tell your stories here!!I'm pagan, and I'm pretty low key about it. I have nothing against Jesus. If he existed, I think he must have been a pretty cool dude. But, I don't consider myself a Christian per se. I've worn jewelry that represents my faith and gotten raised eyebrows and a few comments here and there, but nothing I can't handle. Patients have been pretty ok with it but maybe that's the pre-op drugs doing their job, lol.
    Not one of my patients or nurse I work with know my beliefs( atheist ) because I don't discuss them what ever my patient is, I am. Blessed Be!
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    Since I was brainwashed into the Catholic religion as a child, being forced fed prayers I had to memorize by heart, and walk in a straight line to church....its incredible how my mind just turned all that preprogramed nonsense out of my head. I dont NOT believe what the Catholic religion has instilled into my veins back then, but it gave me a foundation for my life......to give me an idea that a power exists way beyond what the wee people on earth think. It opened doors for my mind.....I do believe in God, I know that there is a POWER that exists that made us all, whether by accident or by design.....IT HAPPENED. No one can tell me that God is non existent. I know and Feel God in every person I meet. I think people on this earth have to be very open hearted nowadays to what the WORD GOD MEANS.....for religion is man made......everything is man made on this planet. Except Nature/Cosmos......
    cannolis, babydog, and kabfighter like this.
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    Think of it this way.....if people KNEW there was a better life after death and there was proof of it for all the world to see....then we would have no people on earth here....everyone would WANT to die......but then, whats wrong with that? Why is there this purgatory/hell that we have to go through here? I would ask my patient.....What do YOU FEEL THE NEXT LIFE WOULD BE LIKE? and let him think about it over and over again. Afterall, that is what heaven is supposed to be like, all the things you loved and cherished in this life and all the happiness along with it. I wouldnt want the person to die alone either.....although this happens often in hospice or LTC. I think they need that solice to have someone with them as they leave this earth to meet their family/friends/pets on the next plane. This is so important. Not to leave this planet alone, I feel. I think most people are worried they wont be saved or meet someone else or feel something when they die......its a feeling of being abandoned, a lonliness, unwanted feeling. I think that is the worst feeling in the world.
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    I always found it strange when my professors in school brought Christianity into lesson plans, never questioning if students had other spiritual preferences (although they were saying to be open to all religions/beliefs). As a nurse, I do not feel that my spirituality/religion is intertwined with my profession. It makes no difference to me what my patients believe in, they get treated the same regardless of beliefs. I keep my opinions on religion and politics to myself at work because everyone has their own convictions. Truthfully, why does anyone care what another person does or does not believe in? We have to live our own lives and abide by our own rules. As long as we are not offended by or offensive to our patients none of it really matters.
    somenurse likes this.
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    Quote from GadgetRN71
    If so, have you gotten grief from coworkers or patients because of it? Tell your stories here!!I'm pagan, and I'm pretty low key about it. I have nothing against Jesus. If he existed, I think he must have been a pretty cool dude. But, I don't consider myself a Christian per se. I've worn jewelry that represents my faith and gotten raised eyebrows and a few comments here and there, but nothing I can't handle. Patients have been pretty ok with it but maybe that's the pre-op drugs doing their job, lol.
    My answer remains the same: It isn't about your spiritual beliefs, it is about the patients'.
    sssT and Piglet08 like this.
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    Quote from MN-Nurse
    My answer remains the same: It isn't about your spiritual beliefs, it is about the patients'.
    EXACTLY. My religion/spirituality is beside the point. I am in the process of converting from paganism to Reform Judaism, and I don't think any of my patients know, unless they caught me surreptitiously reading one of my Jewish books during some down time.
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    I know quite a few nurses who actually became RN's because of their faith. Of course I would only know this since I share the same faith with them, as they wouldnt go around announcing it to co-workers or patients. Nursing is a natural profession for christians to go into by helping and caring for others. My friend feels like she is doing the Lords work with her hospice care, even if she never professes her faith to her patients. I personally would never try to force my beliefs or prayers on a patient unless asked by them to do so. I do find comfort in knowing I am helping a patient when they ask me to pray for them or with them. Christian patients do sometimes find it comforting to know that their nurse shares their belief when they find out. As far as non-believing patients, it is not my job to tell them what to believe, I care for them regardless of what they believe, even if it is nothing! I would never put them down or try to "save" them, I would only love and care for them.

    People like to put all christians into the same catagory and generalize them. Every christian, every person, and every church has their own beliefs, and some of them are not at all the same. The term "Christian" and its beliefs are so broad and varied that one cannot put a single label on it. Granted, their are some christians who give us a bad name with their constant preaching about money and the "better than thou" attitudes, and more. Everyone is guilty of grouping all faiths together as one such as pagens, atheists, Jews, muslims or what ever the faith would be. We need to remember that even those groups have differing beliefs among them. Like politics, religion is something that should not be discussed in the work place. Every one will have a different opinion, and it would only cause conflict and ill feelings. Religion is a very personal thing so I think people of all faiths should respect their co-workers and patients and just keep it to themself if at all possible!
    OlderRNinGA likes this.


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