When Nurses Cry - page 3

by tnbutterfly 70,669 Views | 46 Comments Admin

Although itís been more than 30 years ago, I remember the occasion very clearly. My first death on Peds as the charge nurse. It was horrible. A four-month old with a congenital heart defect was to be discharged that afternoon.... Read More


  1. 1
    Sheila,

    I would love you to be able to take care of my mother if she was ever placed in a LTC facility. I agree it is heartbreaking. Being sensitive is a beautiful thing in this world. Don't worry about what the other nurses say. Believe me, patients can tell when you really care.
    tnbutterfly likes this.
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    As a Sun-Acute nurse and having been a LTC CNA for many years in the past, I find myself sometimes walking a fine thin line when trying to remain unattached to those I care for. The key words being "care for". My patients are my focus and their families become my partners in the care of my patient. In some ways we become family-like. They share their lives with me and their fears. I laugh with them and cry with them. This relationship can last for weeks or years and bonds are formed. I have been blessed in that each experience has made me a stronger nurse and better human being.
    sistasoul likes this.
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    We are just as human as those we care for, and we do cry. Some of us cry a lot, some hide the tears. Dealing with patients that somehow strike a chord in our hearts is just part of the job, an occupational hazard, as it is. There's a terrible stigma with showing sadness in nursing sometimes, yet, we also smile. You just can't have one emotion without the other, even if they're all hidden under a "business" exterior.
    tnbutterfly likes this.
  4. 0
    Thanks for sharing..really needed to read this today!
  5. 0
    Quote from sistasoul
    I have cried quite a few times at work. The worst for me was the 88 year old man who I was discharging to a rehab facility to get stronger from a fall before going home. His wife who had recently had a stroke was at a LTC facility. He would call her every night and visit her every day when he was home. THe rehab facility was not the same one his wife was at and all he wanted to do was to be with her. He sobbed continuously through the D/C process and while he was being wheeled out the door to be transported by EMS. He just kept saying over and over that he would never see his wife again. I cried with him. I will never foget how heart breaking that was or that patient. I was completely drained for hours after that.
    He did eventually need LTC and was able to be placed in the same facility with his wife.

    THe other thing that kills me is when I see sons and daughters crying over their elderly parents. It reminds me of just how special our mothers are and how much they are loved. I usually tear up with them.
    This breaks my heart, this is why I can't work Geri
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    I haven't cried since Mama died in 2008... until I read this. And I remember all the times we coded patients, I remember not the names but the outcomes. And I cried in failure and later on in frustration as to WHY people have to die away from their loved ones most of the time. Thank you Butterfly-as usual you put the words down I would like to have said.
    FranEMTnurse and brian like this.
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    Quote from P_RN
    I haven't cried since Mama died in 2008... until I read this. And I remember all the times we coded patients, I remember not the names but the outcomes. And I cried in failure and later on in frustration as to WHY people have to die away from their loved ones most of the time. Thank you Butterfly-as usual you put the words down I would like to have said.
    Ahhh........P_RN. You've kept all those tears bottled up in you. Crying can be therapeutic.......even long after the fact. A good cry can cleanse your soul.

    I recently read a quote by Lord Byron.

    "The dew of compassion is a tear."
    brian likes this.
  8. 1
    Quote from sheliapntr2012
    My fellow nursing friends tell me I need to toughen up but I dont think I want to toughen up. I am afraid I will get cold hearted if I do. What do you think?
    I have always felt that way too.
    tnbutterfly likes this.
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    My philosophy is that when nurses and health care professionals stop feeling and crying (at least on the inside), it is time that they get out of the profession. For ours is a "caring" profession.
    xoemmylouox and NurseCrys09 like this.
  10. 1
    Quote from LindaBright
    We are just as human as those we care for, and we do cry. Some of us cry a lot, some hide the tears. Dealing with patients that somehow strike a chord in our hearts is just part of the job, an occupational hazard, as it is. There's a terrible stigma with showing sadness in nursing sometimes, yet, we also smile. You just can't have one emotion without the other, even if they're all hidden under a "business" exterior.
    Well said.
    tnbutterfly likes this.


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