The Power Of Prayer in Healthcare - page 2

According to Oxford Dictionaries, prayer is defined as a solemn request for help or expression of thanks addressed to God or another deity. Although people usually associate praying with organized... Read More

  1. Visit  apocatastasis profile page
    2
    In my opinion, any effects that these studies show should be attributed to the calming and self-regulating effect of "prayer" (which was not defined-- is meditation or tai chi or yoga included in this, or do you have to pray to the right god for it to work?). Major depression alone has been shown to have a wide range of deleterious consequences in nearly every condition from recovery from cardiothoracic surgery to chronic renal failure to IBS to wound healing times.

    I think a positive attitude, mindful behavior, and meditation definitely are great things to cultivate. They have been shown to have positive effects on mental and physical health. Prayer, for some people, may be a part of this (though very infrequently, from what I've observed in my own life). As an ex-Catholic, ex-monastic atheist, I am also aware that people use these sorts of findings to infer existence of a supernatural deity: something that is not, can not, and will never be supported by any literature.
    Tragically Hip and tokebi like this.
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  3. Visit  tokebi profile page
    4
    This could've been a very interesting and thought-provoking article but lost its credibility when it's referenced to the likes of ezinearticles.com or huffingtonpost.com. In general, using secondary sources to support your claim is not a good idea because it can appear as a lazy way of writing. If you analyzed the data from primary sources and synthesized your argument systematically, we might be having a nice discussion on interesting studies and interpretations and what it could all mean, instead of devolving into a typical religious vs. atheist mud-flinging.

    I think a topic of this nature would be more convincing and impressive as a reflective essay, rather than trying to present it as evidence-based.
    Not_A_Hat_Person, leslie :-D, Maseca, and 1 other like this.
  4. Visit  LPNBearColumbus profile page
    5
    Quote from VickyRN
    Excellent article, TheCommuter. Anecdotally speaking, I have witnessed the power of prayer times too numerous to count. One of the most recent involved my husband, who had to undergo major surgery as an extremely high risk candidate. A churchfull of people were praying for him, and he went through the surgery without incident and recovered amazingly well without complication.
    No, his successful surgery and uncomplicated recovery were the result of the skill of the doctors and nurses involved.

    There is no empirical evidence that intercessory prayer does ANYTHING other than make those doing the praying feel better.

    Nursing and medicine are science and evidence based professions. Let's keep them that way.
    brownbook, kabfighter, dimpledRN, and 2 others like this.
  5. Visit  country mom profile page
    1
    Quote from interleukin
    At risk of being barraged with hate mail, I offer the following;

    First , if prayer makes you, or someone else, feel better then by all means do it. After all, prayers can't hurt.

    But suggesting that praying for someone's recovery, from a remote location, can actually contribute to that recovery is magical thinking that undermines the integrity of the Western nursing profession.

    I wonder how many doctors maintain such beliefs?

    Prayer is hope, and hope is a good thing...as long as there's a reasonable chance. Otherwise, we end up prolonging suffering "waiting for miracles."

    People pray everyday for recoveries that never happen. Was it, then, just a matter of too few people praying or not praying loud enough?
    If I may, offer one perspective on your question here listed. In the Christian Lord's Prayer, there is this phrase given, "Thy will be done". Thereby, the one praying commits their request to the will of God. The loudness of prayer, or number of prayers said, or the will of the one making intercession is irrelevant. By doing this, the one praying submits themselves to whatever the outcome is. One might say that to pray is not to "gain points" or make some attempt to win favor, but to bring in line one's own will in order to submit to the power of the One to whom they pray. Sometimes, that means accepting what we cannot change (borrowed that line from the AA serenity prayer.)
    TheCommuter likes this.
  6. Visit  GitanoRN profile page
    2
    needless to say,sometimes you hear someone say, "we've done all we can, the only thing we can do now is pray"...just saying ~
  7. Visit  Been there,done that profile page
    2
    I am a reformed agnostic. I have been blessed by a divine intervention. I came across an article that actually documented an increase in a cancer patients blood supply to the affected area by the power of prayer from the congregation. I am so sorry I cannot share that link.
    There are many things we cannot see or document. Nurses are scientific minded.

    We should NOT let that close our minds or hearts to a higher power.
    TiddlDwink and TheCommuter like this.
  8. Visit  Tragically Hip profile page
    3
    Quote from Been there,done that
    I am a reformed agnostic. I have been blessed by a divine intervention. I came across an article that actually documented an increase in a cancer patients blood supply to the affected area by the power of prayer from the congregation. I am so sorry I cannot share that link.
    There are many things we cannot see or document. Nurses are scientific minded.

    We should NOT let that close our minds or hearts to a higher power.
    I would not change my life-stance based on one medical study you can't reference, and which has been refuted by other studies, including the large, comprehensive study I referenced above.

    "increase in a cancer patients blood supply to the affected area by the power of prayer from the congregation"

    Wow. I have a Loch Ness monster I can sell you.

    "We should NOT let that close our minds or hearts to a higher power."

    I'm waiting for first shred of decent empirical evidence for it. Is there an apologia for why it choses to be so elusive?
    dimpledRN, Maseca, and apocatastasis like this.
  9. Visit  agreer2 profile page
    2
    I personally feel like if a patient wants to pray let them. If they ask me too then I will pray for them. I do believe that if you truly ask for healing then God will grant IF it is his will. Who needs evidence based practice when the Bible gave true examples. Just a thought
    TiddlDwink and TheCommuter like this.
  10. Visit  interleukin profile page
    3
    "I am very curious over the amount of spirituality on display on this Web site, and I mean all over. I've never seen anything like it among any group of professionals, much less, among those practicing a science-based, evidence-based profession. Is it a function of the personality types attracted to the profession, or to helping professions involving personal care? Is it a function of gender?"

    With some unease I, too, have wondered about that.
  11. Visit  interleukin profile page
    1
    "I am so sorry I cannot share that link."

    Rather convenient.
    dimpledRN likes this.
  12. Visit  agreer2 profile page
    0
    I think it is a good thing that people display such spirituality in such a field. I think it is God and God alone.
  13. Visit  interleukin profile page
    3
    Quote from agreer2
    I think it is a good thing that people display such spirituality in such a field. I think it is God and God alone.

    I need some Zofran.
    malamud69, kabfighter, and dimpledRN like this.
  14. Visit  agreer2 profile page
    0
    Quote from interleukin

    I need some Zofran.
    I'm sorry you do. Just my opinion.


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