The Nurse's Role in Providing Spiritual Care - Is It OK to Pray? The Nurse's Role in Providing Spiritual Care - Is It OK to Pray? - pg.7 | allnurses

The Nurse's Role in Providing Spiritual Care - Is It OK to Pray? - page 9

This brought up much discussion about whether or not offering prayer falls within the scope of the nurse while providing spiritual care. Is it appropriate for nurses or doctors to pray with... Read More

  1. Visit  alpha omega profile page
    #78 0
    I think it's okay to offer to pray, if it's soft-pedaled, like "Some people find comfort in prayer. I can pray with you if you like." If they refuse, then drop it.
  2. Visit  pam101 profile page
    #79 0
    hi tn!. . . i think it's very important to meet the spiritual needs. i have little experience in the field of nursing because i just graduated. placements are my only experience) but during my studies i am interested in this subject. i wrote a thesis entitled "to believe, do, hope: the view of nursing in relation to the hopelessness".

    after a review of the literature, i realized that there are many interventions that nurses can implement to improve the spiritual well-being and give them positive input to continue to take care of themselves and their projects. between these interventions was the prayer. write a letter to someone, do an "about me collection" (keep a box with significant personal objects: photos, a diary...

    in short, the nurses can do so much! the important thing is not posing limits and point to the quality of the nursing, and the principal result must be the welfare of the person and the achievement of all his needs: the needs of body, mind, and soul!

    sorry for my english, i'm Italian and i have to perfect it yet.
    Last edit by TheCommuter on Nov 25, '15 : Reason: [/COLOR] tags
  3. Visit  tnbutterfly profile page
    #80 0
    Welcome to the site pam101 and thanks for your post. No need to apologize.......your English is fine!!
  4. Visit  khminh profile page
    #81 0
    Quote from bethygean
    I know what's "politically correct", but when you are in the Christian faith there is no such thing. Being a Christian effects everything you do and is appropriate in every situation, even in a work place. If you truly know God then you'll know that He's not something you can just leave out of certain "inconvenient" times in your life. Sure, you can't force a patient to pray with you but it is appropriate to ask, whether or not you think the person will accept. If they don't then all you can do is pray silently and go on, but as a Christian, the least you can do is offer hope to someone who is in desperate need of it.
    Political incorrectness only applies when two parties are equal at certain aspects. When I am sick and you are healthy, you have to be political correct with me.

    My mother is a faithful Buddhist while I believe in a higher power. Neither of us are Christians. Thank you for bringing up this issue. I have never thought about this. Now I know that nurses can be fundamentalists, too. When my mom is in a nursing home some day, I will make sure that no Christian, Muslim, Jewish, Hindu, Sikh's beliefs are imposed on her. I will not cause trouble to a nurse who offers her a non Buddhist prayer, but I won't let my mother stay in that place. This is absolutely unacceptable.
  5. Visit  elkpark profile page
    #82 3
    Quote from bethygean
    Sure, you can't force a patient to pray with you but it is appropriate to ask, whether or not you think the person will accept. If they don't then all you can do is pray silently and go on, but as a Christian, the least you can do is offer hope to someone who is in desperate need of it.
    A lot of people, including a lot of healthcare employers, would disagree with you about that. You're not at work to foist your beliefs on vulnerable, ill people.
  6. Visit  Tenebrae profile page
    #83 3
    Quote from bethygean
    I know what's "politically correct", but when you are in the Christian faith there is no such thing. Being a Christian effects everything you do and is appropriate in every situation, even in a work place. If you truly know God then you'll know that He's not something you can just leave out of certain "inconvenient" times in your life. Sure, you can't force a patient to pray with you but it is appropriate to ask, whether or not you think the person will accept. If they don't then all you can do is pray silently and go on, but as a Christian, the least you can do is offer hope to someone who is in desperate need of it.
    Why can you not pray silently?

    Why does the patient need to know at all that you are praying for them?

    It strikes me that offering to pray for a patient is more about the nurse having their ego stroked, so people can go 'look at them, arent they sooo spiritual" than actually meeting the spiritual needs of the person.

    I have no problems quitely standing with a patient while they pray if it gives them some comfort. Because its not about me, its about my patient and ensuring their needs are met as much as possible.

    I'm somewhat areligous. If the patient wanted more than that I would have to say "hey, I'm probably not the right person to help you with that, let me find out who the chaplains are and call someone for you" or "do you have a priest or a pastor I can call for you
  7. Visit  SunnyPupRN profile page
    #84 1
    As an atheist, it would be dishonest and disingenuous of me to pretend to believe or pray. I'm happy to be of support, listen to a pts beliefs without judgment, provide encouragement or peace where appropriate, but I will not insult either of us by faking something in which I don't believe.
  8. Visit  Melabee profile page
    #85 0
    I feel like there is a BIG difference between praying with someone if they ask you to and OFFERING to pray for/with someone. I don't feel like it's appropriate to offer to pray for someone but I would pray with someone if they asked me to.

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