Religion Needed to be a Good Nurse? - page 17

We just covered a spiritituality/religion lesson in our BSN course and the instructor (religious) came out and said good nurses had spirituality and would be there for whatever spiritual needs the PT... Read More

  1. by   Bipley
    Quote from ZASHAGALKA
    In regards to sep of c/s:

    Once you give the gov't the power to limit religion, you give it the power, at its discretion, to limit all religions to the exclusion of the religion of its choice.

    Today, the gov't's preferred religion is humanism. But what about tomorrow?

    In any case, that is quite Unconstitutional.

    ~faith,
    Timothy.
    I still don't understand your thinking here. If the big 10 are not hanging on the walls of the court, specifically, how does this limit your ability to practice your faith?
  2. by   Bipley
    Quote from asoldierswife05
    I am okay with sep of church and state. It saddens me that they want to remove referrals to God out of our currency, constitution, pledge of allegiance, and such...but mostly because of the historical relevance of it all.
    I love history, I think it is a huge learning opportunity. When we forget history we tend to repeat mistakes vs. learning from the mistakes of those before us.

    With that said, it is my experience that most people don't realize that words were added to money and the pledge in the late 50's. You didn't, right? Lots and lots of people don't realize that. So what is the true value of keeping the status quo for historical reasons when we don't even know history well as a nation? If we don't really know our history, how is it valid to keep things as they are for purposes of what we thought was history?

    I can certainly worship God without seeing the ten commandments hanging in the post office. I wouldn't feel comfortable buying stamps with a statue of Buddha staring at me! haha. (not picking on Buddhists...but it would make me uncomfortable because its not what I believe in)
    Fair enough. But what about a Buddhist having to look at YOUR religion's 10 Commandments hanging on the wall? Is it okay for him to feel the same discomfort you express that you feel when looking at the religious symbols on the same wall?

    I realize you explain that you are okay with c/s stuff, I understand that. But I am really making a point here more than anything. You say you would be comfortable in a public building with your own religious symbols but not that of another. What about all the non-Christians out there?

    What about a hospital setting? Not a Catholic hospital or faith based hospital but say the county hospital. If we did put religious icons on the walls, which ones should we use?

    As long as I have the power to post religious symbols in my yard and outside my church, practice freely within my church, and pray in public, then I see no infringment upon my rights.
    Fantastic statement. Wish others could see the value in this.
  3. by   Marie_LPN, RN
    As long as I have the power to post religious symbols in my yard and outside my church, practice freely within my church, and pray in public, then I see no infringment upon my rights.
    I agree. And this is not infringing on someone else's, when i'm not throwing it in their faces.
  4. by   nurse4theplanet
    Quote from Bipley

    Fair enough. But what about a Buddhist having to look at YOUR religion's 10 Commandments hanging on the wall? Is it okay for him to feel the same discomfort you express that you feel when looking at the religious symbols on the same wall?

    I realize you explain that you are okay with c/s stuff, I understand that. But I am really making a point here more than anything. You say you would be comfortable in a public building with your own religious symbols but not that of another. What about all the non-Christians out there?

    What about a hospital setting? Not a Catholic hospital or faith based hospital but say the county hospital. If we did put religious icons on the walls, which ones should we use?
    When you break up my post like that to analyze each paragraph you miss the overall message entirely.

    I support sep of c/s because I SYMPATHIZE with those who feel uncomfortable with my 'Big 10' hanging in government buildings just like I would feel uncomfortable by the presence of a statue of Buddha, Ra the sun god, or what have you.

    Not having Christian religious symbols hanging in government buildings does not inhibit my right to practice my religion and those who fight to have it stay are merely paranoid that the government will interfere with their other religious freedom...however, I believe THAT is unlikely and will be prepared to fight tooth and nail should it happen, but only when the time is necessary...
  5. by   Bipley
    Quote from asoldierswife05
    When you break up my post like that to analyze each paragraph you miss the overall message entirely.

    I support sep of c/s because I SYMPATHIZE with those who feel uncomfortable with my 'Big 10' hanging in government buildings just like I would feel uncomfortable by the presence of a statue of Buddha, Ra the sun god, or what have you.

    Not having Christian religious symbols hanging in government buildings does not inhibit my right to practice my religion and those who fight to have it stay are merely paranoid that the government will interfere with their other religious freedom...however, I believe THAT is unlikely and will be prepared to fight tooth and nail should it happen, but only when the time is necessary...
    No, I didn't miss the overall message and I happen to agree with you. As I explained, I know you are all for keeping c/s apart and I agree with that too. I was merely making a point. There are LOTS of people out there that want their religious icons on walls of public buildings. I was making a point, that's all. I just wish more folks felt like you.
  6. by   nurse4theplanet
    this is why they make private Religious schools...

    I am Catholic and I intend to send my children to a private Catholic School, not force those who are not Catholic or even Christian to be subjected to my idealogy.

    However, I think public school should require a diversity curriculum as part of their core curriculum which would include such classes as World Religions, Cultural Differences, and Ethics...these should be mandantory IMO to strengthen tolerance of others who are different and produce accepting US citizens... Our children and their values/beliefs are the future of this country, so lets do a better job
  7. by   Bipley
    Quote from asoldierswife05
    this is why they make private Religious schools...

    I am Catholic and I intend to send my children to a private Catholic School, not force those who are not Catholic or even Christian to be subjected to my idealogy.

    However, I think public school should require a diversity curriculum as part of their core curriculum which would include such classes as World Religions, Cultural Differences, and Ethics...these should be mandantory IMO to strengthen tolerance of others who are different and produce accepting US citizens... Our children and their values/beliefs are the future of this country, so lets do a better job
    I agree. I was raised Roman Catholic and I was never really exposed to other religions. My parents would let me go to church with my friends just to experience other churches but a kid doesn't really get a grasp of what the religion is all about going to church once.

    Many people hate out of ignorance, they don't know anything about what they hate but many folks fear the unknown. It's sad because it is so easy to deal with via education.
  8. by   VivaLasViejas
    Quote from Marie_LPN
    I agree. And this is not infringing on someone else's, when i'm not throwing it in their faces.
    Marie, out of all the posts in this thread, yours make the most sense, IMHO.:hatparty:

    In only a few well-chosen words, you have stated exactly how millions of red-blooded, God-fearing Americans (including myself) feel about this issue.

    As I personally have said before, other peoples' freedom to swing their fists ends where my nose begins. Sure, it's simplistic, but metaphorically speaking, it means that keeping matters of faith out of public affairs is the only fair solution. Religion, like one's sex life or preference in reading materials, is a private matter and should never be imposed on those who hold a different world view.

    No one is proposing to deny us the right to worship in our own churches and homes, pray wherever and whenever we choose, celebrate our holidays and feast days, or live our lives the way we feel is right.

    No one is saying that we can't put up a Nativity scene on our front lawn at Christmastime, wear a Star of David, or join a coven. We can even form a whole new religion of our own if we want to. What we CAN'T do is force the government to endorse it, and run roughshod over our fellow citizens who choose to believe in something else, or nothing else.

    Now, getting back to the thread's original precept: I think you can be a good nurse without being religious, or even spiritual. But you cannot be a good nurse without bringing to your work what makes you the unique human being you are. You can't leave your soul at home in bed while your brain prioritizes tasks and your hands work to get the job done; you need to use your intuition, your sense of humor, your intelligence, and yes, your heart in order to give the kind of care patients deserve.

    And that is all I have to say about THAT.
  9. by   Thunderwolf
    Another good day of intelligent, respectful discussion. Thank you, all.
  10. by   nurse4theplanet
    Quote from Thunderwolf
    Another good day of intelligent, respectful discussion. Thank you, all.
    did you expect anything less?
  11. by   ZASHAGALKA
    Quote from asoldierswife05
    did you expect anything less?
    Yes, I'm sure this is currently the most watched thread by the moderators. . .

    ~faith,
    Timothy.
  12. by   ZASHAGALKA
    Going back to the original question, Religion needed to be a Good Nurse:

    Part of the problem is our continued characterization as 'angels'. And part of that problem is a problem of history: modern nursing and hospitals are a direct decendant of charitable, religious endeavors.

    But in a big way, I also think this is an image problem. I think it holds nursing back. Or, to quote one of my previous HR manager: "I just don't undertand nurses that are in it for the money. . ." (but you have to tilt your head just so and tsk tsk while you say that).

    Modern nursing is a high tech job that requires lots of education and even more experience to become adept. As has been discussed here, everybody has unique experiences that they can bring to the table in order to be caring. But not everybody is a professional nurse. And being a nurse is more than just caring. Alot more.

    Can you be a nurse without caring? NO. Do you need religion to care? NO. But the more important distinction we SHOULD be making is this: Does it take more than caring to be a professional nurse, a "good'' nurse? Absolutely it does.

    And we should be selling that point at least as much as we promote the better angels of our nature.

    ~faith,
    Timothy.
    Last edit by ZASHAGALKA on Nov 13, '05
  13. by   talaxandra
    Quote from ZASHAGALKA
    Can you be a nurse without caring? NO.
    I know that this is OT, but I disagree. I work with a few nurses who don't care (in the nursing-theory sense of capital-C care), and they're still excellent. I'm think of one guy in particular, who is kind but dispassionate, efficient and a real asset; he cares about his family, his salary, and doing a good job, but he's not at all invested emotionally in his patients. There are days I wish I could be more like him.

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